Tamatea School

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School Context

Tamatea School, in Napier caters for students in Years 1 to 6. Of the roll of 164, 62% identify as Māori, 5% Pacific and others come from a diverse range of ethnic groups. The roll has remained consistent since the 2015 ERO evaluation.

Since the previous ERO evaluation a new principal has been appointed as have several staff. The board of trustees has a range of new and experienced members.

The school vision focuses on empowering students with a sense of identity and cultural awareness and is underpinned by the school MANA values of Mahi Tahi, Ako, Ngākau Pono and Āwhina.

Leaders and teachers have engaged in professional learning and development focused on positive behaviour for learning and literacy.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • reading, writing and mathematics.

The school is a member of the Ahuriri Kāhui Ako.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is not yet achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students.

The majority of students are achieving at curriculum expectation in reading and mathematics. Māori outperform Pākehā in both curriculum areas. Boys significantly outperform girls in mathematics. In writing, approximately half of students are achieving at curriculum expectation. Māori achieve at similar levels to their Pākehā peers. Girls significantly outperform boys.

It was not possible to identify trends and patterns over time due to unreliable analysis of data in 2017 and 2018.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school is accelerating the learning of some students who need this. In 2019 school achievement information shows effective acceleration in writing for targeted students. Both Māori and boys’ achievement is accelerating at faster rates than Pākehā and girls. In reading and mathematics, the school can show acceleration for a small group of students.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Leaders prioritise systems and practices that promote a positive, settled and supportive environment conducive to wellbeing and learning. Building a schoolwide culture centred on improving students access to the curriculum is a key focus. Leadership identifies expertise and accesses relevant external support to ensure student needs are met. Professional learning is aligned to school priorities.

Leaders and the board of trustees work together to seek a range of voices and perspectives to inform vision, values, goals and targets. A shared approach to building partnerships with students, parents, whānau and community is contributing to relationships that support positive outcomes for students.

Learning environments are managed in ways that encourage student participation and engagement. Deliberate planning linked to learning progressions in literacy promote consistent practice and agency in learning schoolwide. A range of engaging teaching and support strategies are in place Student progress is tracked and monitored using a variety of assessment tools. Teacher aides work in partnership with teachers to assist learning and behaviour. Students with additional needs are well supported and included..

A supportive and inclusive curriculum is underpinned by the school values of MANA. Culturally responsive practices continue to be a focus and foster children’s sense of identity and belonging. Behaviour for learning strategies are visible and promote positive relationships. Responsive interventions are sought for children with additional needs. A wide range of equitable opportunities engage students in a broad learning programme.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Leaders should continue to build professional relational trust and collaboration within the school and community, to improve outcomes for students.

This should support the school to prioritise developing a shared and aligned focus on accelerating the learning of those children who need it by:

  • continuing to build capability in moderation

  • building on current writing practices to extend into reading and mathematics

  • developing a shared understanding of effective teaching practice informed by achievement information.

There is also a need to continue the progress made in building governance processes. This should include specific target setting focused on accelerating outcomes for students.

3 Board Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Children’s Act 2014.

4 ERO’s Overall Judgement

On the basis of the findings of this review, ERO’s overall evaluation judgement of Tamatea School’s performance in achieving valued outcomes for its students is: Developing.

ERO’s Framework: Overall Findings and Judgement Tool derived from School Evaluation Indicators: Effective Practice for Improvement and Learner Success is available on ERO’s website.

5 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • recent changes to systems and processes to support improving equity and excellence
  • teaching that promotes the engagement and wellbeing of students
  • a curriculum that promotes positive behaviour for learning.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • improving outcomes for students to achieve equity for all groups in the school and raise levels of achievement overall

  • strengthening consistency of teaching practice to address variability across the school and improve use of data to make decisions about students’ learning

  • effective governance practices that are highly focused on achieving equity and excellence for all students.

Darcy Te Hau

Acting Director Review and Improvement Services (Central)

Central Region - Te Tai Pūtahi Nui

18 June 2020

About the school

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement.

Findings

Parent and community involvement in the school to support learning is a strength. Teachers are highly reflective. Many students are achieving well in reading and mathematics. Writing is an area for improvement. The development of a cohesive and responsive curriculum which reflects the school community is a key next step.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Tamatea School, in Napier, caters for students in Years 1 to 6. Of the roll of 160, 58% identify as Māori and 5% have Pacific heritage.

Students participate in and enjoy a wide range of sporting activities in the school and the community that provide leadership opportunities. The school makes good use of the public domain for sports activities and the nearby hall for special events and assemblies.

Parents, family, whānau and the community are welcomed and involved in many school activities as respected and valued partners in learning.

Many of the positives identified in the December 2010 ERO report have been sustained. A focus on accelerating the progress of learners at risk of under achieving continues to be a priority.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school is strengthening its use of achievement information to improve student learning. Senior leaders and teachers collect a range of achievement information in reading, writing and mathematics. They analyse this well and use it to inform decisions about teaching and learning. This includes setting school targets, identifying staff professional development needs and resources.

Teachers appropriately identify those students who need additional support and their progress is well monitored. Moderation of writing assessments has resulted in greater consistency in teachers’ judgements about students' performance. Initial moderation in mathematics has occurred.

The school reports that many students achieve at, in relation to the National Standard, in reading and mathematics with a gradual improvement identified over time. A substantial number are below the expected levels of achievement in writing. This has been identified as an area for development. Māori students and boys are not achieving as well as other groups.

Parents receive written reports twice a year that provide some useful information about their child’s learning. There are many informal opportunities for parents to discuss their child’s learning during the year. The school should review student reports to more clearly show progress and achievement in relation to the National Standard in reading, writing and mathematics.

Students with additional needs are appropriately identified and a range of programmes and initiatives are in place to support their learning. Evaluating and reporting the impact of these provisions for students to the board should better support decision making.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum effectively promotes success for many students.

The curriculum prioritises literacy and mathematics. The school values underpin teaching and learning. Students are provided with a range of learning experiences in and outside the school. This includes regular involvement in sporting and cultural events and visits from a range of positive role models.

Teachers model strategies that support students to develop the skills required to take ownership of their learning. Students are responding well to this. They cooperate with each other and are self managing.

Recent professional learning in mathematics and reading has strengthened teaching and learning practices. This has contributed to the development of a framework for them to reflect on and inquire into the effectiveness of their practice to improve student achievement.

Pacific students are achieving well. The school is beginning to respond to the Pacific Education Plan to better support the culture, language and identity of Pacific learners.

Teachers are evaluating the use of information and communication technologies to extend students’ learning.

It is now timely to undertake an in-depth review of the Tamatea School curriculum in consultation with parents, family and whānau. The development of a cohesive and responsive curriculum which reflects the school and local community and promotes improved learning should:

  • clearly align with The New Zealand Curriculum, vision, values, principles and key competencies
  • show expectations for effective teaching and learning in all curriculum areas and the integration and coverage of all essential learning areas
  • reflect Māori language, culture and identity across the curriculum
  • show how teachers will support students at risk of underachieving.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

There is a commitment to engaging Māori parents and whānau and listening to their ideas and aspirations. As a result of consultation with whānau in 2014, the school developed a Māori Education plan with a list of goals. To better support the achievement of these goals and educational success for Māori, as Māori, an action plan should be developed and implemented.

There are a range of appropriate opportunities for students to experience aspects of Māori culture. Students participate in the local kapa haka festival, school powhiri, and visits to Pukemokimoki Marae.

The school draws on expertise and support from a kaumatua and resource teacher of Māori. Senior leaders have considered Ka Hikitia: Accelerating Success 2013 - 2017, when planning for 2015.

Staff should continue to strengthen their knowledge and understanding of Māori success as Māori. Including Tātaiako: Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners in the appraisal process should support this.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

Board members are dedicated to their role as trustees and bring a range of experience and expertise. A useful governance manual supports the understanding of their role.

The board is well informed by the principal about school developments. They receive some useful information about student progress and achievement. However, during 2014 the board received limited National Standards achievement information to adequately support their decision making. Trustees should receive sufficient information to ensure improvement targets are lifting student achievement.

Staff are collegial, collaborative and highly reflective. They participate in focused professional learning. The appraisal process has been strengthened and successfully supports teachers’ growth and development.

The school has an ongoing cycle of self review that identifies priorities for improvement and monitors progress. It is timely to develop a more evaluative self-review process. This should enable staff and trustees to better measure the impact of programmes and initiatives on learning, to inform the school's strategic direction.

Community involvement in the school is a strength.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Parent and community involvement in the school to support learning is a strength. Teachers are highly reflective. Many students are achieving well in reading and mathematics. Writing is an area for improvement. The development of a cohesive and responsive curriculum which reflects the school community is a key next step.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.Image removed.

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

19 May 2015

About the School

Location

Napier

Ministry of Education profile number

2686

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

160

Gender composition

Male 51%

Female 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Pacific

Other ethnic groups

56%

34%

5%

5%

Review team on site

March 2015

Date of this report

19 May 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

December 2010

June 2008

June 2005