Newlands College

Education institution number:
268
School type:
Secondary (Year 9-15)
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
1160
Telephone:
Address:

68 Bracken Road, Newlands, Wellington

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Newlands College

Te Ara Huarau | School Profile Report

Background

This Profile Report was written within two years of the Education Review Office and Newlands College working in Te Ara Huarau, an improvement evaluation approach used in most English Medium State and State Integrated Schools. For more information about Te Ara Huarau see ERO’s website www.ero.govt.nz

Context

Newlands College is a state Yr 9 to 13 co-educational secondary school located in the northern suburbs of Wellington.  The school has an ethnically diverse roll and a learning support centre for students that are on the ongoing resourcing scheme (ORS). The school’s vision is for all students to be actively involved in making decisions about their learning, confident in their decisions and able to take risks; able to think laterally and to view learning as a lifelong journey. As a community the school values whanaungatanga (positive relationships), mātauranga (gaining knowledge), akoranga (learning together) and manaakitanga (caring for each other).

Newlands College’s strategic priorities for improving outcomes for learners are:

  • supporting all students’ progress and achievement through quality teaching and learning, safe environments and positive relationships

  • promoting a sense of cultural identity and belonging that provides students with the opportunity to fulfil their potential – with a particular focus on Māori and Pacific students

  • supporting learning support students to achieve to the best of their ability

  • engaging the wider school community – including board, staff, whānau, iwi and local community - in supporting students’ learning and growth.

You can find a copy of the school’s strategic and annual plan on Newlands College’s website.

ERO and the school are working together to evaluate how well the college’s culturally responsive curriculum and teaching practices are supporting Māori students to enjoy educational success as Māori and to fulfil their personal and educational potential.

The rationale for selecting this evaluation is:

  • the board and school community are committed to honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi

  • the college wants to sustain and improve wellbeing and learning outcomes for Māori students

  • to respond to recent curriculum and regulatory changes (ie National Education and Learning Priorities, Education and Training Act 2020 and introduction of the New Zealand History curriculum

  • the board wants to know about the effectiveness of existing strategies, approaches and resourcing on supporting the cultural identity, sense of belonging and achievement of Māori students.

The school expects to see:

  • Māori students and their whānau experience an environment and teaching and learning that nurtures their sense of cultural identity and belonging and provides opportunities to fulfil their potential

  • strengthened confidence and competence of board members, leaders and staff to foster and deliver culturally responsive teaching and learning and wellbeing support

  • the College curriculum effectively reflecting New Zealand’s unique bicultural heritage and mātauranga Māori

  • the development of culturally appropriate approaches to assessment, reporting and internal evaluation.

Strengths

The school can draw from the following strengths to support its goal to sustain and improve wellbeing and learning outcomes for Māori students:

  • An inclusive school culture that values diversity.

  • A curriculum that provides Māori students, and all students, with increasing opportunities to learn about mātauranga Māori and to participate in te ao Māori.

  • Growing bilingual and bicultural capabilities across staff as a result of targeted goals and professional learning.

  • Structures, roles and resourcing support leadership and delivery of culturally responsive curriculum and teaching.

  • Robust internal evaluation practices, which draws on the perspectives of students, whānau and staff, informs ongoing school improvement.

Where to next?

Moving forward, the school will prioritise:

  • implementation of culturally responsive curriculum and teaching practice across all learning areas - with a particular focus on new Year 11 programmes

  • collaborative planning and ongoing professional learning to build teachers’ bilingual and bicultural capability

  • engagement and partnership with local marae, Māori whānau, students and staff to improve governance, leadership and teaching and learning

  • timely monitoring and evaluation of progress toward goals and outcomes for students to inform decision-making and improvement.

ERO’s role will be to support the school in its evaluation for improvement cycle to improve outcomes for all learners. ERO will support the school in reporting their progress to the community. The next public report on ERO’s website will be a Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report and is due within three years.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

10 May 2023

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement.  educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Newlands College

Board Assurance with Regulatory and Legislative Requirements Report 2022 to 2025

As of May 2022, the Newlands College Board has attested to the following regulatory and legislative requirements:

Board Administration

Yes

Curriculum

Yes

Management of Health, Safety and Welfare

Yes

Personnel Management

Yes

Finance

Yes

Assets

Yes

Further Information

For further information please contact Newlands College, School Board.

The next School Board assurance that it is meeting regulatory and legislative requirements will be reported, along with the Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report, within three years.

Information on ERO’s role and process in this review can be found on the Education Review Office website.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

10 May 2023

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Newlands College

Provision for International Students Report

Background

The Education Review Office reviews schools that are signatories to the Education (Pastoral Care of Tertiary and International Learners) Code of Practice 2021 established under section 534 of the Education and Training Act 2020.

Findings

Newlands College is a signatory to the Education (Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016 established under section 534 of the Education and Training Act 2020. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code and has completed an annual self-review of its implementation of the Code.

At the time of this review there were 30 international students attending the school.

Newlands College has very effective systems and processes for self review and provision of pastoral care for international students. The board is well informed on the effectiveness of the school’s provision for international students and is making strategic decisions for the programme’s future.

Good quality programmes and practices are in place to enable students to develop a sense of belonging, make progress in their academic studies and achieve their learning goals. International students are very well supported to participate in leadership, sport and cultural activities outside the classroom and in the wider community.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

10 May 2023

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Newlands College - 16/11/2016

Findings

Newlands College is welcoming and inclusive, with positive respectful relationships underpinning all aspects of school life. The curriculum is effective in promoting learning: engagement, progress and achievement. Many students achieve success in national qualifications. The well-resourced learning centre supports the learning and wellbeing of high needs students. Teachers and leaders decisions focus on improving outcomes for all students.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Newlands College is a Years 9 to 13 secondary school in the Wellington suburb of Newlands. Most students are drawn from local primary and intermediate schools. At the time of this review, there are 910 on the roll including 59 international students. The student population continues to be increasingly diverse, with around 12% identifying as Māori, 9% as Pacific and 25% as Asian.

The college is welcoming and inclusive. Positive, respectful relationships characterise school life. Promotion of wellbeing for learning is a high priority. The learning support centre caters for 35 students with high needs.

An external consultant evaluator has worked within the school to facilitate the community survey, curriculum review and developments in teaching and learning.

The Newlands cluster of schools are considering working together in a Community of Learning.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The college uses student achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement.

Many students achieve success in national qualifications. Overall results for the National Certificates of Educational Achievement (NCEAs) have been generally at or above the national figures over several years. However, this pattern of achievement is not consistently so for all groups of students within the college, and particularly at NCEA Level 3. Nearly all students achieve the literacy and numeracy requirements for NCEA Level 1.

The college retains most students to the end of Year 13 to complete their studies. Most students, including Māori and Pacific students, have gained NCEA Level 2 or higher when they leave.

School leaders use student assessment data appropriately to identify priorities for raising the achievement of specific groups. They recognise that the overall achievement of boys, NCEA merit and excellence endorsements, and the number of Māori leavers attaining NCEA Level 3 are areas for improvement.

Improved school systems have increased teachers' access to a wider range of data and assessment tools. There is an expectation they will use achievement information to respond to individual and group needs. Year 9 entry data is used to identify learning needs and group students according to their prior achievement.

School leaders and trustees prioritised the improvement of writing achievement in Years 9 and 10 to support students’ preparation for NCEA. This aligns with the college's strategic goals. Reported data for 2016 shows good progress towards the student achievement targets.

Leaders and teachers collaboratively review data to identify how best to meet the needs of students. There is comprehensive monitoring of overall student achievement and individual progress. This enables leaders to consider the impact of their practices on improving outcomes, and inform future changes.

Students at risk of underachievement are prioritised for additional support and individual mentoring. Year group deans successfully track and monitor progress and respond to students' needs.

Parents are well informed about their child’s attainment and engagement. The digital parent portal enables parents to access regularly updated information about progress and achievement.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The college's curriculum promotes successful outcomes for many students. It is broad and reflects The New Zealand Curriculum. Traditional pathways for students are complimented by an increasing range of subject options.

The outcomes of the recent review of the college's curriculum intentions are articulated in the ‘Vision for learning’ introduced in 2016. This clearly expresses the values and desired outcomes for all learners. Leaders are now focused on its integration into teaching and learning.

A well-considered process supports students’ successful transition into the college. Good relationships with parents and dialogue between teachers are evident in the college's approach.

A collaborative, wraparound system supports student wellbeing and learning. Pastoral teams share responsibility for mentoring and supporting students at risk of underachievement. Requirements for improvement are well understood and articulated. Individual student profiles include goals and planned actions that are responsive to identified needs. Parents are fully involved and contribute to the development of these profiles. Teachers share information to ensure a collective and appropriate response.

A range of programmes support students to make informed choices about options, pathways and careers that relate to their strengths and interests. Useful links to tertiary institutions and work places promote transition from the school to further study or employment. STAR and gateway courses cater well for those who opt for work-place experience. Students can sample career possibilities through a wide range of choices.

Creativity and innovation in curriculum design are encouraged. Leaders and teachers are trialling initiatives for raising achievement. These include:

  • flexible groupings to cater for students' differing learning needs
  • new programmes and practices to respond to students’ strengths, cultures and changing needs
  • assessments to allow students to demonstrate learning in creative ways.

Planned evaluation of these initiatives should determine what practices are most effective in supporting improved student outcomes.

A priority is building positive relationships through mentoring that promotes students' sense of belonging and high expectations for their achievement and success. Students have opportunities to be involved in a range of co-curricular, academic, cultural and sporting groups. Their ideas are valued and responded to.

The well-resourced learning support centre provides an inclusive environment to support the learning and wellbeing of students with high needs. These students learn within the centre and across the college. A wide range of external activities broadens students' horizons. Well-considered processes support students and their families to transition into and from the college.

Leaders have a clear understanding of the strengths and development areas for teachers. In the classrooms ERO observed, it was evident that:

  • students were well engaged in their learning
  • teachers selected suitable strategies to meet learning needs
  • classroom environments were positive and inclusive
  • relationships between students and teachers were a strength.

Leaders and teachers focus on strengthening student agency. ‘Active learning’, a whole-school initiative in 2016, is seeking to increase students' understanding of their learning. It encourages them to follow their interests in authentic contexts.

The introduction of digital devices and elearning has provided extended opportunities for students to be involved in decisions about their learning and take responsibility for their achievement. Further developing teacher knowledge and practice to achieve this aim, and reflect the college's learning vision, is a well-considered next step.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The college is continuing to promote educational success for Māori students, as Māori. Māori students can access a wide range of cultural experiences and leadership opportunities. Student voice is valued through the Komiti Māori that provides a forum for communication and collaboration. The whānau advisory group has continued to strengthen its contribution to the college’s strategic direction.

Developments in active learning encourage students to inquire into their cultural heritage and demonstrate their strengths and knowledge. Students can now achieve NCEA credits through cultural performances and activities. Continuing to building staff capability to meet the needs of Māori students should support sustainable development and improvement. A newly appointed leader of Māori is a valuable source of support for teachers who are seeking to increase their knowledge and culturally-responsive practice.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The college is well placed to promote and sustain continued improvement.

Teachers and leaders make well-considered decisions focused on improving outcomes for all students. Initiatives and curriculum modifications are introduced in a measured manner, reflective of the college's vison for learning. Students are increasingly at the centre of curriculum decisions.

Faculty reviews and reports are well aligned to the college's achievement priorities. Collaborative processes provide information about learning, activities, and student progress and achievement over the year. The college is seeking to engage faculty leaders in working to improve the current framework for annual reporting.

Strengthening the evaluative capability of all leaders should support knowledge and understanding of the impact of curriculum changes on student engagement, achievement and progress, and inform decision making about next steps.

A strengthened appraisal process was introduced in 2016. It provides clear expectations and focuses on improvement. Teachers are encouraged to reflect on their practice in relation to performance criteria and Tātaiako – Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners. Fully implementing and embedding all aspects of the appraisal process is a next step.

Teachers inquire into the impact of their teaching in order to strengthen responses to students’ differing needs. Further developing their understanding of inquiry should support them to use data more effectively to determine what strategies make the biggest difference to students' learning. Whole-staff professional development is well planned and implemented, and aligned to college priorities.

The stable and experienced senior leadership team sustains a positive school environment to promote learning and support wellbeing. It manages change well. Leadership is collaborative and develops a culture of trust and collegiality that supports development of professional practice. A distributive approach is promoting leadership opportunities across the college.

The college has strengthened relationships with its community. Leaders sustain good relationships that engage parents and whānau in supporting their children. The digital parent portal enables tracking and monitoring of students’ achievement and attendance. Regular communication and reporting promotes learning-centred partnerships.

Effective community collaboration occurs through the work at the Pacific fono and whānau advisory groups. Māori and Pacific trustees assist community input into the college's strategic direction. Development of a new college vision and charter has included wide community consultation.

Trustees are well informed about student achievement and progress. The principal provides analysed data as a basis for their discussion and decision making. The board receives information that shows progress towards annual goals and in relation to its strategic direction. Trustees scrutinise the effectiveness of the college in achieving valued outcomes for students. Including more detail in annual targets for priority groups of students should assist decision making about what supporting actions are needed.

Provision for international students

The college is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The college has attested that it complies with and meets all aspects of the Code. At the time of this ERO review there are 59 international students from Asia, Europe and South America. The college makes positive changes for students in response to its internal evaluation findings.

Students' pastoral care includes learning and accommodation support. Their orientation to the college is well considered. Systems for identifying and responding to individual needs and interests are effective. English language learners receive appropriate tuition. Care is taken to provide courses, including for NCEA, that reflect the interests, needs and aspirations of students and their families. Students participate in cultural and sporting activities in the college and community. They are able to share their cultures with others and show leadership.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Newlands College is welcoming and inclusive, with positive respectful relationships underpinning all aspects of school life. The curriculum is effective in promoting learning: engagement, progress and achievement. Many students achieve success in national qualifications. The well-resourced learning centre supports the learning and wellbeing of high needs students. Teachers and leaders decisions focus on improving outcomes for all students.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

16 November 2016

About the School

Location

Newlands, Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

268

School type

Secondary (Years 9 to 13)

School roll

910

Number of international students

59

Gender composition

Boys 52%, Girls 48%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pacific

Pākehā

Asian

Indian

Other ethnic groups

12%

9%

42%

20%

8%

9%

Special features

Learning Support Centre Van Asch Deaf Education Unit

Review team on site

August 2016

Date of this report

16 November 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

November 2013

September 2010

November 2006


 

Newlands College - 12/11/2013

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Newlands College provides coeducational secondary education for students in Years 9 to 15 in the Wellington suburb of Newlands. A multicultural student population, with significant numbers identifying as Asian, Indian, Māori and Pacific, is a feature of the college. The learning support centre caters for 45 students.

The areas of strength identified in ERO’s September 2010 report are sustained. The board and staff are committed to, and promote student wellbeing, engagement and learning. Respectful relationships between students and adults contribute to a positive and inclusive environment. A strong focus on supporting Year 8 students in their transition to secondary education is evident. Students participate in different forums to express their views and perform leadership roles. This includes separate committees for Māori and Pacific learners.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Teachers are using student achievement information to provide better targeted teaching for Year 9 and 10 learners. Assessment Tools for Teaching and Learning (asTTle) in writing is in its second year of use across curriculum areas. Teachers set goals to support student progress in writing and are improving their use of assessment for learning tools. Reading data shows that students make progress over time.

The school’s strategic goal of increasing the proportion of merits and excellences in National Certificates of Educational Achievement (NCEAs) has resulted in notable improvement at Level 1 and Level 2. Female learners, including Māori, experience high levels of success. NCEA Level 3 results have improved as have university entrance results with some fluctuations consistent with national trends.

Trustees receive useful NCEA information that benchmarks schoolwide results in relation to similar coeducational schools and other national statistics. The board is focused on improving educational outcomes, particularly for identified priority learners.

Students are encouraged to set goals and formally reflect on their progress. They appreciate opportunities to better manage their learning and the extra help many receive from mentor teachers.

ERO’s external evaluation affirms the school identified next steps to:

  • further review and develop specific strategies to improve learning outcomes with a particular focus on priority learners
  • set differentiated annual targets to improve Year 9 and 10 literacy and numeracy results.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Newlands College offers students a traditional curriculum, with a strong emphasis on academic achievement, cultural and sporting opportunities. A consistent understanding of the role of key competencies supports learners. In-depth community consultation recently reconfirmed the framework of programmes for teaching and learning. Some additional pathways for senior students are provided. These include sports science, hospitality, trades academy and Gateway work place learning experiences as from Year 12.

Good models of teacher practice are evident. Students are enthusiastic and confident learners. Teachers are focused on building positive relationships with students. Regular professional learning opportunities have contributed to teachers' awareness of students’ cultural identity and heritage. Specific strategies to support Māori learners and Tātaiako, the cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners, are part of staff professional learning and development (PLD). The Pacific Education Plan has heightened teachers’ knowledge of strategies that support Pacific learners. Linking teachers’ performance appraisal to cultural knowledge and the implementation of PLD outcomes are next steps.

Students enrolled in the learning support centre are well supported by staff to achieve their individual education plan goals. They experience a broad range of learning opportunities across the school and in the local community.

The 2010 review of the guidance and pastoral network resulted in the introduction of additional mentoring groups for Māori, Pacific and learners who require extra support. The school reports that mentoring is having a positive impact on student achievement. The scheme will be evaluated by senior leaders as part of its review cycle.

ERO’s external evaluation affirms school identified next steps to continue to

  • review the effectiveness of the school’s curriculum in relation to The New Zealand Curriculum’s principles and values, culturally responsive practice, the role of information and communication technologies and senior students’ pathways
  • strengthen annual curriculum reports and formalise inquiry into the impact of teaching strategies on the achievement and progress of priority learners.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Trustees, teachers and whānau have a vision for Māori as a positive and integral part of the college. "Komiti Māori" continues to provide students with a forum to support each other and to guide school kawa. Students' sense of belonging and opportunities for leadership are promoted through their participation in kapa haka and entering the regional competition with a neighbouring school.

The status and role of He Roopu Manaakitanga, the whānau advisory group, has been strengthened by increased support from families and a deputy principal who provides a link to school operations. Two members of this group are members of the board of trustees. This further strengthens strategic decision making.

A recent survey of successful senior Māori students conducted by the whānau advisory group identifies factors that have contributed to positive outcomes. The information is being used to provide a stronger focus on improving Māori students’ progress and achievement. Whānau and the school community are focused on ensuring education success and achievement for Māori as Māori, and are aspirational for Māori students' futures.

How effectively does the school promote education success for Pacific, as Pacific?

The school has made progress in collecting and reporting schoolwide student achievement information for Pacific learners. A target supports improved NCEA qualification levels. The introduction of "Pasifika Komiti" enables learners to meet and discuss issues. A teacher was recently appointed to have oversight of Pacific learners. Students are members of mentoring groups and report that they value the extra help they receive from teachers.

The Pacific family group regularly meet and are beginning to develop a strategy to have their views considered by trustees. The planned consultation about the strategic plan provides an opportunity to further strengthen provisions for Pacific learners.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

The senior leadership team (SLT) continue to provide cohesive student-centred professional guidance. The team undertake a key role in quality assurance of curriculum activities, appraisal and leading PLD.

The board provides stable and robust governance, underpinned by appropriate policies and procedures. Trustees are committed to their role and work in sub-committees to consider areas for action, supported by the SLT when appropriate. They receive useful information and are open to further strengthening their role in monitoring the strategic plan’s implementation. Community consultation and involvement in learning are highly valued by trustees. Recent strategies to support stronger learning partnerships include a parent portal on the school website to monitor students’ progress.

The planned redevelopment of the college’s strategic plan provides a valuable opportunity to further improve its performance, particularly for learners requiring additional support. Trustees are well placed to improve their representation of whānau, Pacific and family views.

ERO’s external evaluation affirms school identified next steps to:

  • redevelop the strategic plan incorporating views from across the community, including Māori and Pacific
  • further strengthen connections between school improvement targets, departmental goals, teacher appraisal and student outcomes
  • refine the links between assessment and professional practice.

These steps should assist in consolidating and extending existing self-review practice.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. At the time of this review there were 42 international students attending Newlands College. They come from a wide range of countries, including Chile, China, Germany, Hong Kong, Japan and Thailand.

The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

ERO’s investigations confirmed that the school’s self-review processes for international students are thorough. There are clear expectations for the international programme, including induction and careful monitoring of students’ wellbeing and learning. There is a strong focus on matching individual courses of study to their future aspirations.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.Image removed.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services

Central Region (Acting)

12 November 2013

About the School

Location

Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

268

School type

Secondary (Years 9 to 15)

School roll

969

Number of international students

42

Gender composition

Male 54%

Female 46%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Asian

Māori

Pacific

Indian

Other ethnic groups

46%

16%

12%

9%

8%

9%

Special Features

Learning Support Centre

Van Asch Deaf Education Unit

Review team on site

September 2013

Date of this report

12 November 2013

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

September 2010

November 2006

February 2004