Raureka School

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Education institution number:
2662
School type:
Contributing
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
330
Telephone:
Address:

910 Gordon Road, Raureka, Hastings

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School Context

Raureka School, located in Hastings, has children in Years 1 to 6. Of the 322 children enrolled, 36% identify as Māori and 11% as of Pacific heritage.

The four key values of respect, responsibility, resilience and relationships are prominently displayed around the school and are integrated into class programmes. The school’s vision is to develop: confident, connected, curious children who strive for personal excellence.

Current charter goals include improving outcomes for identified groups of students and increasing the numbers of learners achieving at and above curriculum expectations in literacy and mathematics.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in reading, writing and mathematicsthat includes the progress of groups of learners.

Professional learning and development (PLD) for teachers in 2018, includes a Kāhui Ako wide focus on culturally responsive relationships through Poutama Pounamu. PLD is continuing in leadership, wellbeing, health and physical education.

The school is a member of the Ngā Hau e Whā Kāhui Ako|Community of Learning.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

School achievement information shows that the majority of students, including Māori, achieve at or above curriculum expectations for literacy and mathematics. The majority of Pacific students are new to the country and qualify for additional language learning support. The school has a focus on reducing disparity for these learners.

The school’s analysis of student achievement information shows improved outcomes for students who continue in the school for more than two years.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school is continuing to develop its effectiveness in responding to students whose learning needs acceleration. There is evidence to show that some students have made accelerated progress in mathematics and reading.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Since the June 2015 ERO report, teachers have increased their focus on identifying and responding to students’ specific learning needs and closely monitoring their progress. Instructional organisation, task design, modelling and grouping practices promote active learning. Processes around monitoring and tracking of target students are well developed. There is a clear focus on identifying priority learners, knowing their strengths and their needs and staff identifying specific teaching strategies to support progress. Teachers work cooperatively to plan for needs.Regular review of students’ progress and achievement is well monitored and aligned to the appraisal process.

Staff, community and students have refreshed the school’s vision and values. These are well known and embedded across the school. Students and staff have a shared understanding of the values that underpin teaching and learning. Deliberate teaching strategies are strengthening understanding of the key competencies that link to the values.

Inclusive systems are responsive to students with additional needs. Collaborative relationships with parents, whānau and external agencies, along with individual planning and appropriate use of resourcing, promote students’ engagement in learning. They learn alongside their peers.

Trustees attend PLD to better understand their stewardship role. The board places importance on partnerships with the wider community. Together with another school, they are working with local agencies to develop a hub that provides multiple services to support wellbeing.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Understanding of evaluation is developing through teachers’ inquiry of the effectiveness of their teaching. It is now timely for leaders, teachers and trustees to develop a shared understanding of internal evaluation to know the impact of school processes and practices on outcomes for students.

School systems for analysing data need refinement to clearly show where disparity exists and to enable specific targets to be set.

There are useful curriculum statements and guidelines for literacy and mathematics. Further work is needed to align the Raureka School Curriculum with The New Zealand Curriculum and to extend guiding information across all the essential learning areas.

The strategic focus on cultural responsiveness and Māori learners through schoolwide PLD should further impact positively on student outcomes. Teachers’ professional learning opportunities challenge their beliefs and provide opportunities to learn and apply new knowledge and process it with others.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • values that underpin all aspects of school operation
  • systems and processes that identify and respond to the needs of priority learners
  • an inclusive school culture that supports students’ learning and wellbeing.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • refreshing the curriculum to reflect the richness and breadth of The New Zealand Curriculum and to reflect local priorities
  • increasing shared understanding of internal evaluation processes and practices at all levels of the school to know what is working and what is not to inform future decision making. [ERO will provide an internal evaluation workshop for trustees and senior leaders]

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in three years.

Patricia Davey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

27 June 2018

About the school

Location

Hastings

Ministry of Education profile number

2662

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

322

Gender composition

Female 52%, Male 48%

Ethnic composition

Māori 36%

Pākehā 42%

Pacific 11%

Indian 5% O

ther ethnic groups 6%

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

Yes

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

June 2018

Date of this report

27 June 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review June 2015
Education review August 2010
Education Review June 2007

Findings

Students' participation in learning is well supported by positive relationships. New entrants experience a smooth transition into school. Some good teaching practice is evident. Increasing the focus on accelerating progress in learning and reviewing the effectiveness of interventions and actions should promote improved student outcomes. The school is strengthening partnerships with its parent community.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Raureka School caters for nearly 300 students from Years 1 to 6 in Hastings. The roll includes a growing number of Māori students, who currently make up 47% of the roll. A satellite class of Kowhai Special School is based within the grounds.

Two new deputy principals have recently been appointed. Staff comprise several teachers with long association with the school, and some new appointments in response to an increasing roll. Property developments have occurred to improve learning spaces.

Teachers have been involved in a range of professional learning opportunities in literacy and mathematics. The school has recently begun to participate in the Ministry of Education Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L) project. A number of initiatives have been introduced to support parents’ contribution to learning and participation in school activities.

The school has a positive ERO reporting history.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Staff regularly gather and collate a wide range of data about student achievement in reading, writing and mathematics. Teachers use this information to identify areas for focused teaching of individuals and groups.

The recently introduced use of databoards supports teachers’ discussion about student achievement and progress. It provides teachers and leaders with opportunities to build a shared understanding of achievement and progress and to strengthen their understanding of assessment tools and National Standards.

Further development of these practices should assist leaders and teachers to explore trends and patterns in data and assist in monitoring the rates of progress for learners and groups of learners identified through targets. There are some good examples of ongoing monitoring of students’ progress and learning.

Some good systems are in place to identify students, including English language learners, who require additional learning support. They are provided with a range of programmes and interventions to enhance their learning. Evaluation of interventions in relation to clear goals and for accelerating learning is a next step.

Student achievement data in reading, writing and mathematics shows that many students achieve at the National Standards, and some achieve above. The school recognises that there are significant numbers of students who achieve below the Standards. Targets for improved achievement are set in response to data. To better support increased rates of progress for these learners, senior leaders should:

  • provide deeper analysis of trends and patterns in schoolwide achievement data
  • improve schoolwide systems and practices for tracking the progress of groups of learners
  • regularly monitor, analyse and report on the progress of targeted learners.

These actions should assist in setting more meaningful targets for improvement, clearly identifying areas of strength and areas for improvement, and help to build on students’ successes as they progress through the school.

Teachers are working to strengthen their understanding and consistency of overall teacher judgments about students' achievement in relation to National Standards for writing. This occurs through in-school moderation, discussion and professional development. Changes to practices for reporting achievement and progress to align with National Standards have strengthened the validity of data in the junior school. Developing a schoolwide, systematic approach to the use of assessment and moderation should continue to build consistency and robustness of judgements.

Reporting to parents provides useful information about students’ achievement and progress and has been strengthened through inclusion of next learning steps. Teachers are promoting students’ involvement in assessment through a range of strategies.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum reflects an appropriate focus on literacy and numeracy. In response to professional development, teachers are working to develop shared expectations for consistent practice in literacy and mathematics. Engagement in PB4L is providing the school with an opportunity to review school values and expectations for students’ positive engagement in school life.

Further development of a cohesive curriculum, in consultation with the school community, should include:

  • establishing a clear, shared vision for successful learners, including for success as Māori
  • ensuring the principles and key competencies of The New Zealand Curriculum are well integrated
  • a locally-based perspective which also responds to learners’ cultural backgrounds, strengths and interests, particularly for Pacific students
  • provision for ongoing review of effectiveness.

Students' access to digital learning has been improved through increased resources and ongoing professional development. Teachers are exploring ways to further integrate e-learning into classroom programmes. Guidelines for safe and effective use, and profiles of an effective digital learner have been developed. The next step is to develop a strategic action plan to enact shared understandings of good practice in relation to 21st Century teaching and learning.

Students benefit from positive, respectful interactions with teachers. They are well supported to contribute and collaborate in classrooms that are suitably organised for learning. Teachers share the learning purpose for lessons and use modelling and questioning to engage and develop students’ ideas and understandings.

Teachers have strengthened connections for students and their families as they transition from early childhood education into school. They actively seek information about new entrants. The recently developed junior programme provides a good bridge to the school curriculum from pre-school experiences and the early childhood curriculum. It is responsive to their strengths, needs and interests and helps to build positive learning relationships amongst families, students and teachers.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school has worked to strengthen its provision for Māori learners. Students learn about aspects of te ao Māori through schoolwide events and activities such as kapa haka, marae visits and planned teaching of te reo Maori. There is an increased expectation for teachers to demonstrate culturally responsive practice.

Whānau hui and parent surveys provide a forum for exploring the aspirations held for children and for consultation about school cultural events. Shared views provide useful directions for guiding school development.

Developing a clear, shared vision for success as Māori in Raureka School and a plan of action for improvement are next steps. These developments should provide useful frameworks to guide teaching and learning practices, and support development and review of the school’s effectiveness in promoting the language, culture and identity of Māori learners.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to continue to provide positive outcomes for learners. Further strengthening of processes and practices should support the school to promote increased student progress and achievement.

Staff work collaboratively and benefit from opportunities to reflect on and share their practice. There is improved support for teachers’ professional development through appraisal, which includes goal-setting, observations and discussion.

A process to assist teachers to inquire into the impact of their teaching in priority areas has been introduced. This helps teachers to focus on the learning needs of students and to reflect on their actions for promoting learning. Further development and analysis of findings from teacher inquiries, specifically linked to targets, should enable leaders and teachers to identify and embed strategies and practices that are effective for these learners.

A new leadership team is working to develop a shared understanding of effective practice and ways to promote schoolwide consistency. Establishing clear expectations and processes for building leadership capacity across the school should support these endeavours. Expectations should be clearly focused on the leaders' role in promoting accelerated progress of identified learners.

Trustees, many of whom are new to the role, continue to develop their understanding of governance. A handbook has been developed to support them to undertake their responsibilities. There is a planned cycle for policy review. The board is well informed of school developments and operations in relation to the strategic plan. Improving the analysis and reporting of trends and patterns in student achievement, particularly for groups of learners, should support decision making.

The school is focusing on strengthening learning partnerships with parents and families and responding to their views and ideas for improvement.

A next step is for the school to develop a clear process for reviewing the effectiveness of interventions and actions in promoting school priorities. Ensuring there is a clear alignment between the curriculum, strategic planning, implemented actions and self review should support improvement.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Students' participation in learning is well supported by positive relationships. New entrants experience a smooth transition into school. Some good teaching practice is evident. Increasing the focus on accelerating progress in learning and reviewing the effectiveness of interventions and actions should promote improved student outcomes. The school is strengthening partnerships with its parent community.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

19 June 2015

About the School

Location

Hastings

Ministry of Education profile number

2662

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

296

Gender composition

Female 51%,

Male 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Pacific

Other European

Indian

Other ethnic groups

47%

36%

7%

3%

3%

4%

Special Features

Attached Unit, a satellite class of Kowhai Special school

Review team on site

May 2015

Date of this report

19 June 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

August 2010

June 2007

May 2004