Putere School

We maintain a regular review programme to evaluate and report on the education and care of young people in schools.

We are in the process of shifting from event-based external reviews to supporting each school in a process of continuous improvement.

There may be delays between reviews for some schools and kura due to Covid-19 and while we transition to our new way of reviewing.

Read more about our new processes and why we changed the way we review schools and kura.

Find out which schools have upcoming reviews.

Education institution number:
2657
School type:
Full Primary
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
13
Telephone:
Address:

2254 Putere Road, Putere, Wairoa

View on map

Summary

Putere School is a small rural primary, for children in Years 1 to 8, located approximately 59 kilometres southwest of Wairoa. The current roll is five students from three families in the district. Strong support from families and the community continues to be a feature of the school.

Staffing has remained stable. There have been some changes to board membership.

The school is part of the Wairoa West cluster. It also engages with other local rural schools. This participation supports staff professional learning and development and provides sporting and cultural interaction for students. Putere School has joined the recently formed Wairoa Kāhui Ako | Community of Learning.

The school is a health promoting school.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school has sound systems and processes to support equitable outcomes for children. Most students are achieving well in reading, writing and mathematics. The school is responsive to those children whose learning and achievement needs acceleration. The school has strategies to raise the achievement of all learners.

The school environment has a positive tone. Relationships are warm and respectful. Students experience a broad curriculum and have opportunities to learn in authentic contexts. There is a collective responsibility for, and a strong focus on, student learning and wellbeing.

To further improve outcomes for students the board and principal should:

  • further develop internal evaluation to determine effectiveness of practice

  • continue to develop a culturally responsive curriculum

  • continue to develop robust policies and procedures related to health and safety and appointments.

The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity and excellence in educational outcomes for students.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school responds well to those children whose learning and achievement needs acceleration. Teachers know the children well and plan appropriately to meet their needs.

The school reports that most children achieved at or above in relation to the National Standard in reading, writing and mathematics. Reported analysis of schoolwide data showed an overall strength in reading. Teachers have identified that mathematics, particularly around number knowledge and strategies, is a focus for 2017.

Processes used by the school for assessment support dependable decisions that inform judgements in relation to National Standards. Teachers work well with others in their cluster to ensure the dependability of their judgements across the curriculum.

Children who require additional learning support are well identified. The school works collaboratively with parents and whānau and external agencies to support participation and engagement in learning.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school has robust systems and processes to support equitable outcomes for children.

Children experience a broad curriculum that is responsive to their strengths and interests. It effectively promotes the school’s priorities and supports targets for equity and excellence.

The school environment has a positive tone where relationships between children and adults are warm and respectful. The close partnership with parents and whānau contributes to valued learning-centred relationships. Children work collaboratively and engagement in learning is high.

Learners have opportunities to work in authentic and relevant contexts. Over time they have actively participated in developing the school’s physical environment. The school gardens are integral to their learning.

A range of appropriate and effective strategies is used to engage with parents, whānau and the wider community to support children’s learning. Parents and whānau are well informed about their children’s progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Their views are sought and valued and these contribute to decision making.

The board and principal are appropriately focused on improving outcomes for students. Trustees are well informed about student achievement. They use this information to effectively allocate resources to support school improvements. 

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

To better promote equity and excellence and sustain good practice the board and principal should:

  • continue to develop robust policies and procedures related to health and safety and appointments, to ensure that the board is meeting its legislative obligations

  • further strengthen the curriculum to be culturally responsive by weaving te reo me ngā tikanga Māori throughout daily practices.

The June 2014 ERO report identified internal evaluation as a next step. This remains an area for development.

The school should develop internal evaluation to move the focus from what is being done, to the effectiveness of practice and the impact on student learning, progress and achievement.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014. 

ERO identified non-compliance in relation to health and safety policies and procedures, surrender and retention of property and searches of students.

In order to address this, the board must:

  • ensure that it has polices, practice and procedures on surrender and retention of property and searches of students.
    [Sections 139AAA - 139AAF Education Act 1989; Education (Surrender, Retention, and Search) Rules 2013]

To improve current practice, the board of trustees should:

  • further develop procedures for health and safety to support children’s wellbeing.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

Agreed next steps are to:

  • further develop internal evaluation to determine effectiveness of practice

  • continue to develop a culturally responsive curriculum

  • continue to develop sound policies and procedures related to health and safety and appointments.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Alan Wynyard

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

23 June 2017

About the school

Location

Raupunga

Ministry of Education profile number

2657

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

5

Gender composition

Boys 3, Girls 2

Ethnic composition

Māori 1
Pākehā 4

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

May 2017

Date of this report

23 June 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review June 2014
Education Review April 2011
Education Review September 2007

 

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Putere is a small rural, full primary school located approximately 59 kilometres southwest of Wairoa with a roll of nine. A well maintained outdoor environment allows students to engage in a range of physical activities.

The school is well supported by the community, parents and trustees, all with a common vision of providing students with high quality education in the best environment possible. Strong community involvement is a feature of the school environment. Highly effective partnerships are established.

Stability in governance, management and teaching staff since the April 2011 report contributes to sustained and ongoing improvement. Good practices identified in the previous report have been sustained. Progress in self review is evident.

Putere School is part of two rural school cluster groups. This participation supports staff professional learning and development and provides sporting and cultural interactions for students.

The school has a strong focus on fostering students’ appreciation and importance of sustainable land use and conservation. This is evident in the gardens developed by the students.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Students are highly engaged and active learners. They achieve well with most placed at or above in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Māori students achieve as well as their peers. Additional support is provided to students, as and when needed.

A suitable range of assessment tools including observations are used to continually monitor progress and identify patterns of achievement. Data is analysed in depth and used to put strategies in place to promote learning. There continues to be a focus on improving students’ writing achievement across all levels. As part of this, the principal is inquiring into the effectiveness of practice used in accelerating student progress and achievement in writing. Ongoing participation in professional development with the Wairoa West rural schools provides a further avenue of support.

Individual learning goals promote students’ progress and achievement in relation to National Standards. Students know what they are learning and what they need to do to improve, helped through regular discussion and conferencing.

Effective partnerships between home and school support students' learning. Reports to parents are clear and detailed. Parents have ongoing opportunities to share and celebrate students’ learning and progress.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Students experience a broad curriculum which promotes literacy, mathematics, health and physical education. Learning programmes are linked to the rural context of the school. Parent aspirations are acknowledged. The principal builds on these by using an inquiry approach to make learning relevant and interesting.

The curriculum should be strengthened by developing an overarching Putere School curriculum statement. This should include reference to how the principles of The New Zealand Curriculum are enacted and include for careers education and second language options for Year 7 and Year 8 students.

Interactions between adults and students are friendly and respectful. The principal uses a range of effective strategies to promote learning and engage students. Learning is relevant, purposeful and fun. Information and communication technologies are well used by students as a tool for learning.

Student views are sought, valued and acted on. Senior students support those who are younger.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Māori students experience a learning environment in which their language, culture and identify are recognised and valued. Participation in the Wairoa South rural schools cluster provides opportunities for students to take part in cultural activities.

Exploring the local environment incorporates te ao Māori aspects of conservation and use of natural resources. The principal’s awareness of Ngāti Kahungunu cultural standards is beginning to be reflected in the learning programme.

The principal acknowledges and ERO affirms the need to continue to develop his knowledge and understanding of te ao Māori.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance. Systems for governance and management are sound. The families of all students are represented on the board.

The principal manages his role of teacher and principal well. He actively seeks professional and collegial support through Wairoa rural school cluster groups. The board is kept up to date about student progress, achievement and school operations. The appraisal process effectively supports professional development and growth. Staff development should be further strengthened by considering Tātaiako: Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners.

The principal and board are highly reflective and clearly improvement focused. Self review is well established and embedded. The focus of self review should now shift from looking at what the school is doing to how well they are doing. This represents a shift from self review for accountability, to self review for quality improvement.

A strong commitment to promoting student wellbeing is evident in the school’s values and actions. An inclusive school culture fosters supportive relationships among students.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.Image removed.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services

Central Region (Acting)

4 June 2014

About the School

Location

Raupunga

Ministry of Education profile number

2657

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

9

Gender composition

Female 5

Male 4

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

1

8

Review team on site

April 2014

Date of this report

4 June 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

April 2011

September 2007

May 2004