Pukehamoamoa School

We maintain a regular review programme to evaluate and report on the education and care of young people in schools.

We are in the process of shifting from event-based external reviews to supporting each school in a process of continuous improvement.

There may be delays between reviews for some schools and kura due to Covid-19 and while we transition to our new way of reviewing.

Read more about our new processes and why we changed the way we review schools and kura.

Find out which schools have upcoming reviews.

School Context

Pukehamoamoa School, located in a rural district west of Hastings, caters for 104 students in Years 1 to 8. Of the learners enrolled, 39 identify as Māori.

The school’s mission statement ‘ Strength through knowledge – Kaha mā te mātauranga’  is supported by the shared values of ‘knowledge and understanding of others, knowledge of thinking, knowledge of learning, knowledge of ourselves, knowledge of our past and knowledge of communication’. The vision is to provide the highest standard of education for students through providing enriching experiences, that will create connected, confident, life-long learners striving for their personal best.

The school has established annual learning targets for 2018 focusing on increasing the number of students achieving at their expected level in writing and mathematics.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • progress and achievement in reading, writing and mathematics
  • progress and achievement in relation to school targets for writing and mathematics
  • engagement and wellbeing
  • attendance.

A new principal was appointed to the school in Term 4 2016. The roll has remained stable. The staff have attended Incredible Years professional learning and development (PLD).

Pukehamoamoa School is part of the Mataruahou Napier City Kāhui Ako. 

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

Student assessment procedures, implemented in 2017, support the collection of reliable achievement data. This indicates that the majority of students, including Māori, achieve at or above the school’s expectations in reading, writing and mathematics. The identified disparity between girls and boys in writing is being addressed in 2018, with the school’s mid-year data showing improvement for boys.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school is accelerating learning for some students who need this. Leaders and teachers report on acceleration for individual students. The school is yet to analyse schoolwide rates of acceleration over time.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

The new leadership team has established a collaborative environment based on relational trust. They ensure that policies and practices promote students’ wellbeing and engagement in learning. There is a strategic focus to develop and pursue the school’s vision for equity and excellence.

Leaders work effectively with staff to build consistent assessment and teaching practices to ensure that achievement information is dependable. Clear expectations for collecting student data and strong moderation practices have been implemented. A robust appraisal system supports teachers to build their capability.

Leaders and teachers establish positive relationships with students and families. Parents, whānau and the community are welcomed and involved in a range of school activities. Recent school initiatives, actively involving parents, are supporting the development of more reciprocal learning-centred partnerships.

Students are supported to participate in and engage with their learning. Relationships between children and teachers are positive and respectful. Tuakana teina interactions promote learning. The school has strengthened its response to children at risk of not achieving through the implementation of Raising Achievement Plans. This framework enables teachers to determine students’ specific learning needs and plan targeted teaching strategies and interventions to promote their accelerated progress.

Students with additional learning needs are identified and well supported with a range of resources appropriate to their individual needs.

The board actively represents and serves the school and community in its stewardship role. Trustees bring a range of skills to the board. They demonstrate a strong commitment to the ongoing promotion of the school and the long term success of learners. 

2.2  What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Since the September 2015 ERO report, the school has undergone a significant period of change. Continuing to consolidate and embed new systems, processes and practices is a key priority for the school.

Leaders identify that continuing to develop aspects of the curriculum is a key next step. The school has set priorities in the areas of student agency, digital technologies and the development and implementation of a Māori education strategy. An ongoing focus on continuing to grow teachers’ capability to support a culturally responsive curriculum for Māori learners is important.

Trustees, leaders and staff are reflective, and self review is an established process. Leaders gather a range of information to inform decisions for improvement. Further developing a shared understanding and use of internal evaluation is a key next step. This should better support trustees, leaders and teachers to know what has the most significant impact on raising achievement and what is needed to sustain ongoing improvement of equity and excellence.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Area for improved compliance practice

To improve current practice, the board of trustees should:

  • ensure in-committee minutes are used for discussing and recording matters of a sensitive or confidential nature. 

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • the response to students requiring acceleration in their learning that is personalised
  • the school leadership team that is focused and capably building consistent teaching and learning practices to promote positive outcomes for students
  • community involvement that supports students’ learning and wellbeing
  • trustees who represent the community and skilfully serve the school in their stewardship role.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • continued curriculum development to realise the school’s learning priorities and ensure a culturally responsive curriculum for Māori learners
  • continuing to develop a deeper shared understanding and use of internal evaluation to know what has the most significant impact on raising achievement.

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in three years.

Alan Wynyard
Director Review and Improvement Services

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

12 October 2018

About the school 

Location

Hastings

Ministry of Education profile number

2651

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

104

Gender composition

Male 53%, Female 47%

Ethnic composition

Māori                               38%
Pākehā                             61%
Other ethnic groups          1%

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

No

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

August 2018

Date of this report

12 October 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review            November 2015
Education Review            September 2012
Education Review            September 2009

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Pukehamoamoa School is located in a rural district, west of Hastings. It caters for students in Years 1 to 8. The roll of 100 includes 39 students who identify as Māori. The school provides an inclusive and caring environment that supports students’ wellbeing.

Since the September 2012 ERO report, a new principal, deputy principal and two teachers have been appointed.

Students develop leadership through school, community and cultural roles. A family-focused atmosphere enables positive relationships to develop amongst students, teachers, families and whānau.

Parents are actively involved in school activities and valued as partners in their children’s learning.

The school has responded to all areas for further development identified in the previous ERO report.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Leaders and teachers use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement. Each student’s individual progress in relation to reading, writing and mathematics is closely tracked and often discussed by teachers.

Teachers regularly share data and teaching strategies as students move across year levels. They use this information to plan programmes that cater for students’ different strengths and needs. Individual Education Plans, put in place for students not achieving expected learning outcomes, include targeted strategies.

Students set individual learning goals. Teachers use feedback and identify next steps with students to build their understanding of how well they are learning and what is needed to progress. Leaders and teachers have identified, and ERO agrees, increasing students’ voice in learning and assessment is an area to further develop.

Data shows that in 2014 most students achieved at or above National Standards in reading and mathematics. Fewer students were at or above in writing. Māori and Pacific students’ achievement are at similar levels to their peers.

To address lower levels of achievement in writing, teachers have worked with an external provider to develop school writing models and build a shared understanding of making robust judgements about students’ achievement levels. Leaders are making links with other schools to discuss these decisions. Continuing to build these relationships is a useful next step.

Students requiring extension or extra support are provided with suitably targeted programmes based on their needs. Individual programmes are planned with families and whānau and monitored through goals and student outcomes.

Parents receive useful information about their children’s progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Including suggestions for how parents can help at home in written reports should further support students’ learning at school. Teachers make sure there are regular opportunities for whānau and families to participate in activities to build conversations that link learning at school and home.

The Pacific students at the school are of Samoan heritage. Their culture is valued and shared in classroom programmes.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The Pukehamoamoa School curriculum promotes successful learners. It has a clear focus on literacy and numeracy. The school is currently reviewing its curriculum. The local curriculum should include:

  • better alignment with all aspects of The New Zealand Curriculum
  • expectations for effective teaching, including culturally responsive strategies
  • programmes that promote New Zealand’s dual heritage and Māori students’ success
  • learning experiences located in the community
  • a clearly documented Years 7 and 8 careers education programme.

This should enable better alignment with current classroom programmes and guidance for consistency of classroom practice.

Teachers consistently think about how well teaching practices are improving students’ achievement. They work collaboratively, discussing student information and identifying specific strategies to accelerate their progress.

Teachers use a good range of assessments and approaches to identify and effectively respond to oral language concerns for particular students.

Students keenly engage in learning. They confidently question and offer their ideas. The use of quality feedback and students’ involvement in assessing their learning are areas for further development.

Positive relationships are developed with students and families during responsive transitions to school. The new entrant teacher has a good relationship with the local playgroup. Students’ early learning experiences are recognised and built on.

A strategic approach is being developed to provide students with access to computer-enhanced learning. This initiative is focused on strategies to engage students in learning using digital technologies.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

A school-wide plan focused on Māori student learning and teaching has been developed and shared with the local runanga. It promotes learning and identifies a graduate profile for Year 8 Māori students, based on cultural aspects. Seeking further input into the plan from the runanga is an important next step to develop more shared ownership of the plan.

Leaders and teachers are increasing their engagement with whānau through a range of cultural events. There are plans to share Māori students’ achievement data with families on a local marae. Teachers work closely with whānau to support students’ wellbeing. Students’ cultural experiences are valued. Students demonstrate pride in their language, culture and identity as Māori.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

School leaders, teachers and trustees are reviewing and implementing systems and processes that are likely to help the school continue to improve and sustain its performance. Clear identification of expected outcomes in the annual plan is a next step. This should enable trustees, leaders and teachers to evaluate what impacts well on student achievement and wellbeing, and inform their future direction.

The board is provided with regular information about students’ progress and expected levels of achievement. ERO and the principal agree that to further improve information shared with the board, the following aspects should be included:

  • identification of specific groups of students in achievement targets
  • regular reporting on the progress of the target students
  • an evaluation of the impact of extra support and extension programmes on student achievement.

This should ensure the board is better informed of ongoing progress against goals and targets and should contribute further data for trustees resourcing decisions.

Trustees bring a diverse range of experience and expertise to their governance roles. They are involved in ongoing training. The board is community-focused and seeks a range of opinions about school operational matters.

The appraisal process is focused on teacher development and includes targeted professional learning, conversations about teaching and good feedback through observations. Teachers gather and reflect on evidence of their practices linked to the Practising Teacher Criteria. Trustees need to ensure the principal is also appraised against the Practising Teacher Criteria.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

During the course of the review ERO identified an area of non-compliance. In order to address this, the board of trustees must:

  1. ensure that systems are in place to ensure all personnel who are required to be, are police vetted. [Education Act 1989, S78c)

Conclusion

Teachers at Pukehamoamoa School regularly discuss and use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement and achievement. Students’ learning is supported through individualised and extension programmes. Staff promote positive student wellbeing. The school is implementing systems and processes that should continue to improve and sustain its performance.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

16 November 2015

About the School

Location

Hastings

Ministry of Education profile number

2651

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

100

Gender composition

Female 54,

Male 46

Ethnic composition

Māori 39

Pākehā 55

Samoan 2

Other ethnic groups 4

Review team on site

September 2015

Date of this report

16 November 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review September 2012

Education Review September 2009

Education Review June 2006