Peterhead School

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Summary

Peterhead School caters for approximately 500 children from the Flaxmere community in Hastings. The majority of children are Māori and there are high numbers of Pacific learners, mainly of Samoan or Cook Island heritage.

There has been significant staff change since June 2014 ERO review, including several changes to leadership. The long serving principal and deputy principal provide stable senior leadership. Staffing includes a number of beginning teachers.

The values of maramatanga, manaakitanga and whanaungatanga are strongly represented in the three kete ‘I think, I care, I belong’, that continue to underpin all aspects of the school culture. Sustained participation in the Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L) project supports consistent schoolwide practices. Teachers have engaged in ongoing professional learning and development in writing.

The school is a member of the Flaxmere Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school is aligning actions, systems and practices to develop collective responsibility for accelerating learning of children at risk of poor educational outcomes.

A well-constructed, localised curriculum provides a cohesive framework for teaching and learning. The cultural identities of children and their families are celebrated and promoted.

There has been an appropriate focus on maintaining systems that promote improvement and sound school operation. Leaders clearly focus on promoting excellence and improvement and providing equitable conditions for learning.

At the time of this ERO review, many children are achieving well, and there has been a substantial increase in writing achievement. However, there are significant numbers of children, who are not achieving in relation to the National Standards. Next steps for achieving equity and excellence should include:

  • continuing to raise achievement for those learners not achieving at standard

  • deeper inquiry into data to enable more specific target-setting and evaluation of actions to address disparity, especially for Pacific learners and boys

  • further building understanding of inquiry and internal evaluation for improvement and for determining the effectiveness of actions. 

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

The school has requested that ERO provide them with an internal evaluation workshop.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is aligning actions, systems and practices to develop collective responsibility for accelerating learning of children at risk of poor educational outcomes.

National Standard data over time shows a steady improvement for achievement in writing and reading. Māori are generally the group with the highest proportion of children achieving at and above the standards in reading, writing and mathematics. However, many children achieve below in all three learning areas. Significant disparity for boys in literacy continues. Nearly half of Pacific children need accelerated progress to achieve in relation to National Standards. Mathematics is an area for further improvement.

Teachers identify all children who require additional support. They plan actions to promote their learning and progress. Children and whānau are well informed and supported to participate in promoting their child’s learning progress.

Following a schoolwide focus in 2016, there has been significant acceleration for all groups of children in writing. Sustained, comprehensive review and development of the writing programme occurred. This resulted in clear expectations and processes for collaborative, integrated and consistent teaching practice, with a deliberate focus on learners requiring targeted support. Teachers regularly discuss these children’s achievement and progress.

An important next step in promoting equity is to more deeply analyse and inquire into achievement data. This should help identify specific groups for targeting and assist evaluation of the effectiveness of actions taken for accelerating learning.

Appropriate guidelines and school-developed matrices promote consistent teacher judgments for assessment in relation to National Standards. Senior leaders monitor and guide teachers’ achievement judgments, especially for targeted children. Regular moderation with other schools, along with continued, extended use of the Progress and Consistency Tool (PaCT), should further support dependability of teacher judgments about achievement. 

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The three kete are strongly promoted and well understood by children and the school community. Teachers have high expectations for children’s success and participation. They are well supported to develop leadership through a wide range of opportunities and practices. They show confidence, respect and a sense of responsibility for themselves and others.

A well-constructed, localised curriculum provides a cohesive framework for teaching and learning. It enables children to work towards achieving the school community’s well-developed holistic vision for learning. The principles of the New Zealand Curriculum are highly evident.Further developing children’s understanding and ownership of their learning is a focus for teachers.

School practices, learning opportunities and the environment give value to, celebrate and promote the cultural identities of children and their families. This supports children’s strong sense of belonging and pride in the school and their cultural heritage. Teachers continue to build their competence to be culturally responsive in their teaching practice.

Leaders are clearly focused on promoting excellence and improvement and providing equitable conditions for learning. There is an appropriate focus on ensuring systems and practices are well used and sustainable. Senior leaders work effectively to grow the capability of teachers and new leaders. They have a strategic, collaborative approach to development and promote a positive, affirming school culture based on relational trust.

Appraisal supports teacher reflection and development. A clear process, appropriately aligned to school priorities and Education Council requirements, is well implemented. A teacher inquiry process supports their professional learning and reflective practice. Further development of this process is required to enable teachers to more closely examine the effectiveness of specific teacher practice in relation to student outcomes.

A good platform has been built for effective internal evaluation. The importance of evidence for decision-making is understood. Development-focused review is well considered, comprehensive and consultative. A next step is to further build understanding of inquiry and internal evaluation. Developing a clear process, which supports in-depth inquiry and investigation aligned to clear indicators and evidence, should ensure rigour and useful findings for improvement.

Trustees are strongly representative of and committed to working effectively with the community. Some are long-serving members. There is evidence of good communication and meaningful consultation for decision-making. Trustees’ understanding of their stewardship role and a strategic approach are developing. 

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

There has been an appropriate focus on maintaining systems for promoting improvement and sound school operation. A respectful, supportive and development-focused approach is evident. Next steps for achieving equity and excellence should include:

  • continuing to raise achievement for those children not achieving in relation to National Standards

  • deeper inquiry into data to enable more specific target-setting and evaluation of actions to address disparity

  • further building understanding of inquiry and internal evaluation for improvement and for determining the effectiveness of actions.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of children (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of children
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of children
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014. 

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and/or other children remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated
  • need to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of children’s learning and achievement.
  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate children’s learning and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children
  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress
  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

The school has requested that ERO provide them with an internal evaluation workshop.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Alan Wynyard

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

18 July 2017

About the school 

Location

Hastings

Ministry of Education profile number

2644

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

517

Gender composition

Female 54%, Male 46%

Ethnic composition

Māori 68%
Samoan 13%
Cook Island 10%
Pākehā 7%
Other ethnic groups 2%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

May 2017

Date of this report

18 July 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, June 2014
Education Review, March 2011
Education Review, February 2008

 

Findings

How effectively is this school’s curriculum promoting student learning - engagement, progress and achievement?

Peterhead School is welcoming and inclusive. Parent and whānau involvement is valued. Students participate confidently in meaningful learning. Pride in cultural identity is effectively promoted for Māori and Pacific learners. The school recognises that rates of progress need to increase for some students. Trustees and staff focus on improvement and have high expectations for student success.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Peterhead School caters for Years 1 to 8 students in Flaxmere, Hastings. Of the 510 students on the roll, 67% identify as Māori and 26% are Pacific. Approximately one third of students have attended other schools. An enrolment zone is in place.

The school continues to promote a welcoming, inclusive environment. Parent and whānau involvement is significant and their contributions to school life are valued and supported.

School curriculum and values are underpinned by the Three Kete – ‘Maramatanga - I think, Manaakitanga - I care, Whānaungatanga - I belong'. Involvement in the Positive Behaviour for Learning project (PB4L) has led major review and development of school practices, in consultation with families.

The school continues its good reporting history with ERO.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Student assessment information is purposefully used to identify and respond to the emerging needs of students. There is a strong commitment to promoting student progress and achievement across the school.

A range of relevant assessment tools and good processes supports teachers to make robust judgements in relation to National Standards. Schoolwide 2013 data showed overall progress in student achievement in all three priority areas of mathematics, reading and writing. The school recognises that increased rates of progress are needed for significant groups of students. Reported data shows students make good progress in the first year of school.

School leaders use assessment data to make decisions about professional development for teachers, review and modification of curriculum. A major review of the mathematics curriculum and teacher practice is in progress, and positive results are evident. Writing has been appropriately identified as a next area for improvement and plans to review and strengthen this curriculum area are in place.

Schoolwide targets for improving achievement are set and monitored for groups of students. Regular reporting of progress toward targets should help to evaluate the impact of actions taken. Leaders work to improve their analysis of trends and patterns in data. New timeframes for regular reporting about curriculum areas and student achievement are in place. This supports trustees to make appropriate resourcing decisions to promote priority areas.

Teachers are well supported to work together to make sense of student achievement data. They identify priority learner groups and students who require additional support from specialist learning programmes. A newly developed teaching as inquiry process should assist teachers to focus and respond to targeted students and monitor their progress. It should also help teachers identify strategies that work well to increase rates of progress.

English language learners from Pacific families and students with special or complex needs are well supported. A range of well-considered programmes is effectively coordinated and monitored. A useful referral process and comprehensive transition practices are in place. Programmes are well resourced and teachers have appropriate professional learning, as required.

Parents and whānau are partners in their children’s learning. Written reports include clear information about students’ progress and achievement. Specific next steps for learning and how they can be supported at home are shared.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The curriculum supports students to confidently participate in meaningful learning. The Three Kete provide a framework for students’ academic, social and emotional development. The Peterhead Kawa document shares the vision for successful teaching and learning and recognises Peterhead students’ strengths and needs. Useful, clear expectations and guidelines support successful teaching and learning.

Literacy and numeracy are appropriate priorities. Meaningful experiences, connected to students’ worlds and prior experiences are a feature. Students learn in well-resourced environments. Integrated use of digital technologies supports learning and promotes engagement.

Positive, affirming relationships are evident. Children work well together in their learning. Teachers respond to students’ ideas and questions and help them develop confidence. Children and their whānau experience a strong sense of belonging.

Changes to the make-up of junior classes support new entrants on entry to school. These classes provide a broad, relevant curriculum that responds to their interests and diverse needs. This gives a good foundation for students to be successful and develop useful skills and attitudes.

School leaders have very good processes and practices in place to support effective teaching. They carefully choose professional learning and development for teachers to match priority areas, individual development needs and trends identified across the school. These opportunities help develop teachers’ reflective and collaborative practice.

A sustained focus on positive behaviour for learning and restorative practices has resulted in increased attendance and engagement for some students. This has also enriched partnerships with whānau and aiga and provided clear, consistent expectations for students.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

A range of rich learning opportunities promote success for Māori students, as Māori. Purposeful inclusion of language and culture supports Māori to be confident, competent and have pride in their identity. Te ao Māori is integrated throughout the curriculum.

Teachers are well supported through external and internal expertise and the community to strengthen their knowledge and understanding of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori. Exploration of Tātaiako: Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners and further partnership with Ngāti Kahungunu should continue to strengthen cultural responsiveness.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Pacific, as Pacific?

The school intentionally is welcoming and responsive to Pacific students and their families. Use of students’ first language is encouraged and supported. A range of strategies is in place to help students to develop their confidence and identity as Pacific learners.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain effective practice and promote improved outcomes for students.

Senior leaders work well together to lead change in a thoughtful and carefully planned way. They have high expectations for staff and students. Staff are open to learning. They share and develop their practice to improve outcomes for students.

Self review drives improvement. It is well considered and responsive, focused on student outcomes, and informed by research. School leaders and trustees recognise that increasing the evaluative focus of review, and bringing together initiatives under a clear process should help them to make robust judgements about what is working well.

Trustees represent their community well and show good understanding of their governance role. They are clearly focused on student achievement and improvement. The board provides good opportunities for parents to share their ideas. Trustees are actively involved in school life.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Peterhead School is welcoming and inclusive. Parent and whānau involvement is valued. Students participate confidently in meaningful learning. Pride in cultural identity is effectively promoted for Māori and Pacific learners. The school recognises that rates of progress need to increase for some students. Trustees and staff focus on improvement and have high expectations for student success.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.Image removed.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services

Central Region

19 June 2014

About the School

Location

Flaxmere, Hastings

Ministry of Education profile number

2644

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

510

Gender composition

Female 54%

Male 46%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Samoan

Cook Islands Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Other Pacific

Other ethnic groups

67%

15%

9%

6%

2%

1%

Review team on site

May 2014

Date of this report

19 June 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

March 2011

February 2008

February 2005