Lucknow School

Education institution number:
2590
School type:
Contributing
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
304
Telephone:
Address:

42 Elliott Crescent, Havelock North

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Lucknow School - 11/07/2017

Summary

Lucknow School in Havelock North caters for students in Years 1 to 6. The current roll is 272 with approximately 33% of children identifying as Māori.

The board of trustees is made up of experienced and new trustees who demonstrate a commitment to raising student achievement. The principal has been in the role for several years and there is a reasonably long standing senior leadership team.

Since the 2014 ERO review the school has identified priorities for development. Leaders and teachers have participated in a range of professional learning opportunities aimed at improving student achievement, particularly for Māori students. Literacy and mathematics have been major focus areas along with developing strategies for Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L).

Achievement information over time indicates variable outcomes and disparities for groups of children.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school is working positively to improve its response to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. However, 2016 data indicates that a significant number of children do not achieve at expectations.

Teachers and leaders have participated in a number of initiatives and professional development opportunities to strengthen leadership and improve student learning outcomes. A clear focus on supporting positive behaviour promotes a safe learning environment.

Although the school has many sound processes for targeting and monitoring student progress, trustees and leaders recognise the need to sharpen their focus on accelerating achievement. Strengthening the alignment of school processes to targeted student outcomes is a next step. This will support trustees and leaders to evaluate the effectiveness of actions on learners’ outcomes.

The school has the capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for Māori children remains a priority.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO. 

ERO will provide an internal evaluation workshop to support the school to develop effective planning and monitoring processes to support equity and excellence for all children.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is working positively to improve its response to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

The achievement of Māori learners remains a priority. Significant disparity continues to exist for Māori learners in reading, writing and mathematics and for boys in reading and writing. Achievement across the school has not shifted significantly since 2014 and needs to be improved. As a result of the Accelerating Learning in Mathematics (ALiM) intervention in 2016 many of the 24 targeted students made accelerated progress.

Teachers use an appropriate range of assessment tools. They value the conversations with colleagues around student learning to ensure there is consistency in the way teachers make judgements about students’ achievement. Schoolwide moderation has occurred in writing. Teachers are trialling the Progress and Consistency Tool (PaCT) for reading assessment in 2017. This has the potential to strengthen the dependability and reliability of reported student achievement information.

Students requiring additional learning support are well identified and their needs are known. Individual learning plans are developed in collaboration with parents, whānau and external agencies in response to the individual needs of each student. A range of appropriate interventions and programmes support students’ learning. The senior leadership team regularly measures the impact of intervention programmes on student achievement.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Suitable frameworks support collaborative inquiry into teaching and learning, and evidence-based decision making. The school continues to develop its internal evaluation capacity to promote improvement.

The board of trustees has a strategic focus on raising Māori student achievement. Reports to the board are evaluative and support decisions about long term planning and resourcing.

Highly committed trustees bring a range of experience to support the school. Trustees have sought external support to guide their ongoing work. Roles and responsibilities are well defined. The board recently developed a new policy framework and work plan to guide its decision making. The board should consider how these will remain up to date and continue to reflect current expectations.

Involvement in Accelerating Learning in Literacy (ALL) and ALiM has contributed to building teacher capability and improved student learning outcomes. Growing a shared understanding of effective teaching practices has been a key priority in mathematics and literacy. Literacy remains a priority for 2017.

The school curriculum and achievement plans (CAAP) are supporting teachers’ understanding of what a year’s progress looks like in mathematics. Teachers continue to work on the literacy plan. The curriculum prioritises literacy and mathematics. The inquiry and discovery focus allows children to follow their interests.

Leadership ensures a supportive environment that is conducive to student learning and wellbeing. Students and whānau have input into decision making, particularly in relation to student wellbeing. The school’s involvement in PB4L is promoting a positive culture to support student learning. Warm, respectful relationships are evident. Teachers know children well and value their contributions. Children demonstrate confidence to talk about their learning.

Supportive relationships with the intermediate school and local early learning services support children’s transitions into and out of the school.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

The school has many processes in place to guide the development of equity and excellence. Continuing to focus these more deliberately on reducing disparity for Māori learners is a next step.

School leaders, trustees and teachers need to consolidate and strengthen internal evaluation to focus on how well current processes, systems and practices improve outcomes for students.

Through the school’s developing understanding of evaluation, the board of trustees and leadership have identified the need to:

  • further develop teaching as inquiry
  • strengthen data analysis and tracking and monitoring of those students most at risk of not achieving
  • enhance educationally powerful partnerships with whānau.

ERO’s evaluation affirms these developments. In addition, leaders and teachers should:

  • review the school’s curriculum documentation to ensure it reflects recent school developments and promotes culturally responsive practices
  • share more regularly with the board, data that clearly identifies the progress and achievement of learners at risk of not achieving.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management. 

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014. 

Appraisal audit

School appraisal systems are compliant. To strengthen practice, all aspects should be implemented consistently. The appraisal process, including teachers’ goals are focused on strategic priorities.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and/or other children remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated

and now need to:

  • develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each child

  • improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of children’s learning and achievement.

  • build teacher capability to accelerate children’s learning and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

The school has requested that ERO provides them with an internal evaluation workshop.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Alan Wynyard

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

11 July 2017

About the school

Location

Havelock North

Ministry of Education profile number

2590

School type

Contributing (Years 1-6)

School roll

272

Gender composition

Male 52%, Female 48%

Ethnic composition

Māori 33%

Pākehā 60%

Asian 3%

Pacific 2%

Other ethnic groups 2%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

June 2017

Date of this report

11 July 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review June 2014

Education Review May 2011

Education Review May 2008

 

Lucknow School - 16/06/2014

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Lucknow School is a Years 1 to 6 primary school in Havelock North. At the time of this ERO review the roll was 282, with 38% of students identifying as Māori, an increase since the May 2011 ERO report.

The school’s core values are recognised and understood throughout the school as the guiding framework for learning and behaviour. Respect for others is highly evident and contributes to an inclusive community of learners.

Trustees, senior leaders and teachers have addressed the areas identified for review and development in the previous ERO report.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The principal and teachers make good use of student achievement information that leads to positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement. They use data to track and monitor the progress of individuals and groups. This information enables teachers to make decisions about the support and extension that may be required.

Students with special learning needs are appropriately identified. The school has implemented a range of interventions to support students' progress and achievement, and their pastoral needs.

The school has adopted a teaching initiative, focused on raising the achievement of small groups of learners in literacy. This has resulted in progress for most students involved. This initiative has increased teacher reflection and sharing of good practice, and changes in practice to better support student learning.

Trustees receive regular reports on school-wide student progress and achievement. These are used to set targets and for strategic planning and resourcing decisions.

The school acknowledges that many students are underachieving in relation to National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics.

Plans are in place to continue to increase student progress and achievement particularly in reading and writing. ERO agrees with the senior leaders focus on accelerating the progress of all students.

Parents get useful information about their children's progress and achievement in relation to reading, writing and mathematics National Standards. Teachers' feedback supports students' next learning steps and strategies for parents and whānau to extend learning at home. Senior leaders are continuing to review student reports to parents.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Students experience a curriculum that effectively promotes and supports their learning. It provides a wide range of opportunities for students’ participation.

A strong focus on values and key competencies contributes to the promotion of students' wellbeing. Teaching and learning programmes are well aligned with The New Zealand Curriculum.

Positive, affirming relationships amongst students, staff, whānau and the community contribute to a sense of belonging and ownership. Teachers draw on community expertise and skills. This guides the development of authentic teaching and learning programmes. Students’ experiences in the classroom link to the local community. Learners are supported to be independent, to self manage and become leaders.

Teachers have developed some useful strategies to support students’ learning and to set goals. The principal has identified the need to further support students to have increased clarity about their learning and identifying their next steps.

Students' transition to school is well supported. Partnerships have been developed between the new entrant team and local early childhood teachers. This enhances students' confidence and sense of security.

ERO has identified, and the school agrees, that it is timely to review the effectiveness of learning programmes, in particular the writing programme.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

There is a significant and strategically planned focus on Māori success as Māori. School initiatives are focused on strengthening whānau engagement, increasing te ao Māori context within the curriculum and building staff capability in the use of te reo Māori in classrooms. This has resulted in:

  • an increased sense of connection for staff with students and their whānau
  • learning partnerships developed with whānau
  • strengthened tuakana teina relationships
  • more opportunities for Māori students to show leadership in cultural activities
  • a greater use of te reo Māori in the classroom.

The school has developed a strategic plan with an appropriate vision and focus for Māori success. Partnerships established with Ngāti Kahungunu, and supporting documents are guiding and directing developments.

A next step for the school is to develop an action plan that supports this strategic direction. This plan should include specific progress and achievement targets and indicators of success to improve outcomes for all Māori students.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

Lucknow school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance. Trustees, senior leaders and teachers are very focused on improvement.

Members of the board of trustees carry out their governance roles and responsibilities well. They continue to build their understanding of strategic planning. Trustees are well informed and use information from school community consultation and student achievement data to make decisions focused on improving student outcomes.

Senior leaders support staff and provide opportunities for teachers to take on leadership initiatives within the school. The school-wide direction is clear and focuses on meeting the diverse needs of students.

Teachers work collaboratively to share ideas and reflect on their practice to provide the best outcomes for students. Good strategies and practices are focused on promoting and responding to student wellbeing.

The principal, trustees and teachers have a clear understanding of the importance of forming partnerships with parents, whānau and the wider community. They make positive connections, share successes and seek ideas and opinions to ensure that their decision-making is in the best interests of students.

ERO’s evaluation identifies, and the school agrees, that there is a need to align strategic goals, teaching and learning, appraisal and regular reporting of student progress and achievement. Such an alignment should contribute to improved outcomes for students.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services Central Region

16 June 2014

About the School

Location

Havelock North

Ministry of Education profile number

2590

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

282

Gender composition

Female 50%, Male 50%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Asian

Pacific

36%

59%

3%

2%

Review team on site

April 2014

Date of this report

16 June 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

May 2011

May 2008

June 2005