Kotemaori School

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Education institution number:
2587
School type:
Full Primary
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
15
Telephone:
Address:

4778 State Highway 2, Kotemaori

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School Context

Kotemaori School is a small, rural primary between Napier and Wairoa. Most of children enrolled are Māori.

The school’s vision focuses on sustainable learning. Key values for students are: ‘learners today - mana tangata; have a heart - whai whakaaro; strive for success - kia kaha; shaping my world - whakaauau; and, human nature – paakiki’.

The school’s strategic aims are for each child to achieve success in literacy and mathematics. Supporting targets are for students to make sufficient progress to achieve at or above curriculum expectations.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in reading, writing and mathematics.

Many children at the school whakapapa to local iwi, Ngāti Pāhauwera. The iwi education trust is continuing to develop its links with the school and curriculum opportunities for students, through a memorandum of understanding.

The principal and board chair are experienced. A part-time classroom teacher works with the principal. The school is a member of a local cluster of rural schools that provides events to bring students together each term.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is achieving good outcomes for students, with most achieving at their expected curriculum levels in reading, writing and mathematics. Achievement within the school is largely equitable.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

There is clear evidence of some students making accelerated progress as a result of targeted teaching.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Students learn in a settled and purposeful environment. There are high expectations for selfmanagement of learning and tuakana teina is increasingly fostered. Children enjoy a range of outdoor experiences and opportunities for physical activity.

Students’ engagement with learning is increased through strategies to better target teaching and provide responsive curriculum opportunities. These include using relevant learning contexts. Students’ views and interests are woven into literacy and mathematics approaches. Each student’s interests and next steps for learning are carefully monitored and tracked. Students with additional learning needs are well supported through inclusive practices. External support, including that of the Resource Teachers of Literacy (RTLit), is well used by teachers for reading and writing. More purposeful and targeted use of digital technologies for learning is emerging.

There is a sustained focus on each student achieving well and on developing strategies to lift rates of progress. High expectations support each student to make progress and consolidate their learning. Targeted teaching contributes to some students experiencing accelerated progress. The progress of individual students is well known by teachers. The majority of Māori students benefit from the focus on accelerating their progress and achievement.

Culturally responsive teaching and learning strategies continue to develop well. The school’s relationship with Ngāti Pāhauwera enables students and their whānau to participate each term in rich experiences that celebrate their unique place, language and local history. A recent noho marae for students provided additional opportunities for them to experience success as Māori learners.

Community involvement in the school supports ongoing improvement in students’ learning. This is fostered by the principal and board as part of a sustained focus on building productive learning partnerships between students, whānau and trustees. Opportunities are provided each term for whānau to meet and discuss how well the school is providing for their children.

The board’s governance practices centre on improving student outcomes and broadening the range of learning experiences for students. There is a clear focus on making considered resourcing decisions to support achievement. In annual planning, alignment has increased between improvement targets for literacy and mathematics achievement and supporting targeted actions.

Development of teaching practice is aligned to the strengthened school focus on lifting achievement. Appraisal goals, inquiries into teaching practices and professional development are linked to the annual improvement targets. Teachers continue to explore and implement strategies that support students to experience success. External expertise contributes to induction and mentoring for the provisionally certificated teacher and to the principal’s appraisal.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

The planned review of the school’s curriculum is timely to reflect recent improvements in the teaching of literacy and mathematics. This review should include particular focus on:

  • the key role of the learners in assessment practices and how they can own and lead their learning

  • documenting provisions for the health and sexuality education curriculum, career education and te reo Māori programme

  • providing the board with clear, regular information about progress and achievement in mathematics.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Actions for compliance

ERO identified non-compliance in relation to the adoption of the health curriculum every two years.

In order to address this, the board of trustees must:

  1. ensure that the outcomes of the biannual community consultation about the health curriculum are recorded and reflected in the school’s curriculum.
    [Section 60B Education Act 1989]

Areas for improved compliance practice

The board’s review of policies and procedures requires strengthening. Implementing a regular cycle of review should help to improve current practice by ensuring policies and procedures are kept up to date with recent changes in legislative requirements or guidelines.

This work should include attention to:

  • the appraisal of the principal and the provisionally certificated teacher that outlines the purpose of improvement goals, teaching and inquiry, observational evidence, feedback and next steps

  • the provisionally certificated teacher’s induction and mentoring programme

  • police vetting and safety checks of non-teaching staff

  • the administration of medicine procedure and analysis and reporting of accidents to the board

  • students who require support with their behaviour, including the use of restraint

  • the education outside the classroom policy to reflect the latest Ministry of Education guidelines.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • community involvement and partnerships that are student centred and actively support improved success for learners

  • a deliberate focus on strengthening teaching practices and strategies to improve students’ opportunities to learn, engagement, progress and achievement

  • governance by the board that is focused on making planning and resourcing decisions that support improved learning experiences and achievement.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • the school curriculum, through the planned review by teachers, whānau and trustees, to reflect current practices and the school’s strategic goals

  • strengthening review of school policies and procedures to keep them up to date with requirements.

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in three years.

Patricia Davey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

13 June 2018

About the school

Location

Wairoa

Ministry of Education profile number

2587

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

13

Gender composition

Male 7, Female 6

Ethnic composition

Māori 12
Pākehā 1

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

No

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

May 2018

Date of this report

13 June 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review May 2015
Education Review May 2012
Education Review April 2011

Findings

Kotemaori is a small, rural school that caters for students in Years 1 to 8 in one classroom. The principal was appointed in 2015. School-reported information shows that most students achieve at the expected levels in reading, writing and mathematics. Evaluating how effectively programmes and teaching are promoting learning and achievement is the next step in sustaining and improving school performance.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Kotemaori is a small, rural school in the Wairoa district. At the time of this ERO review the roll was 11, with six students identifying as Māori. All students were organised for teaching and learning in one classroom.

Since the May 2012 ERO report, there have been three changes of principal. The current principal began at the start of term 1, 2015.

There is a respectful partnership with local iwi and learning in the local environment is an important part of the school curriculum.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school uses achievement data well to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement.

Appropriate annual achievement targets are set in reading, writing and mathematics. Assessment information is used to monitor students’ progress and achievement and is reported to the board twice a year. Data is gathered over time.

School-reported information shows that most students achieve well in relation to the National Standards in literacy and mathematics. In response to the analysed 2014 achievement data, a 2015 focus is to support the accelerated achievement of boys and Māori students through targeted teaching.

Students have a settled classroom environment and teachers set high expectations for their achievement. A variety of assessments is used to identify needs and set learning goals in reading, writing and mathematics for each student. These are visible in the classroom and are regularly referred to as part of teaching.

Recently introduced three-way conferences are opportunities for parents to have input into development of the learning goals. Students are beginning to talk about how they are progressing in their learning. Students need more formalised opportunities to reflect and discuss their achievement and next learning steps.

Parents receive clear written information about how their child achieves in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Teacher comments about students’ progress should be clearly linked to their individual learning goals.

Teachers need to think critically about how teaching is improving students’ outcomes overall and in particular those boys and Māori students identified as not making expected progress. Targeted teaching strategies should now be linked to students’ individual goals.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The Kotemaori School curriculum effectively fosters student learning.

School values have been developed and these are actively promoted by the principal. Visual representations of these are displayed in the classroom and thoughtfully linked to students’ learning.

The Kotemaori curriculum document guides teachers’ practice in planning relevant programmes for students. Indicators for achievement and progress at each level are clearly stated and provide a useful tool for monitoring student outcomes.

Learning experiences in environmental sustainability are an important part of the curriculum. These take advantage of resources in the local community.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school is well placed to promote educational success for Māori, as Māori.

The board of trustees has developed a formal partnership with the local iwi, the Pahauwera Trust, and the board is respectful of this relationship. The views of the community are sought and responded to. The memorandum of understanding with the Trust explicitly states that students will have opportunities to connect with their language, culture, customs and values, as Māori.

The school’s Treaty of Waitangi policy provides a useful framework for the board to review how well the memorandum of understanding is enacted through the curriculum. It is timely for this review to be carried out and to develop a plan of action to guide learning and teaching.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain its performance. Trustees provide sound governance through their designated roles. The principal and the board have a good working relationship.

The board is appropriately focused on improving student progress and achievement. The principal regularly reports achievement data to the board. Reports should include evaluation of the effectiveness of teaching in improving student outcomes. This should give the board clarity about how well education at the school meets students’ learning needs and the extent to which annual targets have been achieved.

Teachers are appraised against the professional standards. Teachers should link professional goals to what they have learned about the effectiveness of targeted teaching for improved student progress and achievement.

The board has approved the establishment of a weekly playgroup on the school site. This is recognised as an opportunity to enhance new entrants' transition to school and strengthen community involvement.

To support the growing number of students in the junior levels, the board is investigating the appointment of a teacher aide. Careful consideration should be given to how effectively this resource is used to support student learning and achievement.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

During the course of this review ERO found that police-vetting of non-teaching staff had not been renewed every three years.

The board of trustees should establish a systematic renewal process for police vetting for staff appointed to non-teaching positions. [Section 77A State Sector Act; Good Practice; MOE Guidelines]

Conclusion

Kotemaori is a small, rural school that caters for students in Years 1 to 8 in one classroom. The principal was appointed in 2015. School-reported information shows that most students achieve at the expected levels in reading, writing and mathematics. Evaluating how effectively programmes and teaching are promoting learning and achievement is the next step in sustaining and improving school performance.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.Image removed.

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

26 May 2015

About the School

Location

Kotemaori

Ministry of Education profile number

2587

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

11

Gender composition

Male 7

Female 4

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

5

6

Review team on site

March 2015

Date of this report

26 May 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

May 2012

April 2011

December 2007