Playway

Education institution number:
25391
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
33
Address:

127-129 Gray Avenue, Papatoetoe, Auckland

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1 Evaluation of The Childrens Corner Papatoetoe

How well placed is The Childrens Corner Papatoetoe to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

The Childrens Corner Papatoetoe is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

The Childrens Corner Papatoetoe is a full-day education and care service. It operates from two converted houses, one of which is for infants and toddlers, and the other for children up to six years of age. Each house has a spacious outdoor area. Most of the children attending are of Māori, Pacific or Indian descent.

The owner delegates daily management of the service to a centre manager, who is a registered teacher. There are four registered teachers and two unqualified staff members.

The service's philosophy is to support the best interests of children. This includes teachers developing trusting relationships with parents and whānau, and a respect for families' diverse cultural backgrounds. The centre is part of the Papatoetoe West Kāhui Ako | Community of Learning.

ERO's 2016 report noted that curriculum provision and teaching practices had improved. It recommended the review of governance systems and professional development for teachers to further improve teaching practices. Progress has been made in both areas.

The Review Findings

Children have a strong sense of belonging. They are independent, confident learners who work well with each other. Children confidently make decisions about their learning and make good use of the equipment and resources provided. Infants and toddlers experience a supportive, nurturing environment. They have good opportunities to play outdoors.

Teachers are welcoming and inclusive. They form positive and caring relationships with children, families and each other. Teachers are responsive to the preferences of infants and toddlers and support these younger children's oral language development well. The teaching team has worked deliberately to include children's diverse cultures and languages in the environment and learning experiences. They recognise the need to increase the integration of te reo and tikanga Māori and strengthen support for Māori children to experience educational success.

Parents/whānau who spoke with ERO commented on the positive relationships between teachers, children and families. They appreciate the regular family events and invitations to be involved in community excursions. Teachers talk frequently with families about each child's progress. Encouraging more families to share their wishes for their children's learning is an ongoing priority for teachers.

Children's assessment records show teachers have a good understanding of Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum. They plan the programme together and are responsive to children's interests. The teaching team now needs to evaluate the curriculum provided for individuals and groups of children. This includes how their actions as teachers contribute to and extend the complexity of children's learning. A next step is continuing to build teachers' shared understanding of how to document assessment, planning and evaluation processes well and more consistently.

The manager skilfully leads a cohesive and collaborative teaching team. There is a focus on growing teachers' leadership capacity. All teachers are motivated to make changes that benefit children's wellbeing and learning. A significant investment in team-wide professional development and a robust teacher appraisal process, supported by external mentors, is helping teachers to reflect more critically on their practice.

The service provider and manager ensure that management policies and practices are regularly reviewed. Long-term and annual plans prioritise relevant improvement goals. Managers and teachers could now strengthen internal evaluation, including curriculum review, by developing measurable improvement indicators. Evaluating their progress against these indicators could help the service provider and teachers to identify and document how well all aspects of centre operations are progressing.

Key Next Steps

Key next steps include:

  • teachers improving assessment and planning records to show how they engage all children in complex play that extends their learning over time

  • teachers consistently implementing their learning from professional development in their teaching practices

  • managers and teachers developing their understanding and use of internal evaluation, to explicitly show how improvements to teaching practices, curriculum provision and operational systems benefit children.

Since ERO's onsite evaluation, the service provider has provided evidence to show that non-compliances relating to health and safety have been satisfactorily addressed. The owner must ensure health and safety systems are consistently monitored including the police vetting of unqualified staff.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of The Childrens Corner Papatoetoe completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Steve Tanner

Director Review and Improvement Services Northern

Northern Region

9 October 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Papatoetoe, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

25391

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

50 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Service roll

40

Gender composition

Girls 24 Boys 16

Ethnic composition

Māori
Samoan
Fijian
Indian
Cook Island Māori
other ethnic groups

6
9
7
6
4
8

Percentage of qualified teachers

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:7

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

June 2019

Date of this report

9 October 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

February 2016

Education Review

July 2013

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of The Childrens Corner Papatoetoe

How well placed is The Childrens Corner Papatoetoe to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

The Childrens Corner is located in Papatoetoe. The centre occupies two converted houses, one of which is for children under two years of age and the other for children from two to six years of age. It offers all day care and education for 50 children, including up to 15 children under two years of age.

The centre philosophy was recently reviewed by all teaching staff. The philosophy recognises the importance of a child-centred and play-based approach to learning and development, and partnerships with parents and whānau. It also continues to acknowledge the importance of Te Tiriti o Waitangi as well as the diverse cultural backgrounds of many of the children who attend. Most of the children are of Māori, Pacific or Indian descent.

This is the second ERO review of this privately owned centre. One of the owners continues to work in the centre weekly to manage financial, property and broader governance responsibilities. A new centre manager has been appointed in the last five months. In October 2015, a new teacher joined the teaching team in the under three area.

The centre manager's role is the day-to-day management of the centre, leadership of the teaching team, and programme development. The centre has two fully registered and three provisionally registered teachers.

The 2013 ERO report identified three areas of non-compliance. These related to the quality of the educational programme, self review and teaching practice. In June 2015, staff worked with an external facilitator to develop an action plan to address the non-compliance matters and areas for development identified in the 2013 ERO report. Good progress has been made to improve the quality of the educational programme and teaching practices. Self review is in the early stages of development.

The Review Findings

Children are happy and settled in the centre. They are supported to be independent learners. Children have many opportunities for uninterrupted play. They work well in groups and are often able to sustain play for prolonged periods. They have a lot of fun and enjoy the opportunities for exploration and creativity. Children's voice is valued and they have a strong sense of belonging. Children with special learning needs are well supported.

Teachers provide a welcoming and inclusive environment for children and their families. They have positive and caring relationships with children, families and each other. Interactions are frequent and teachers support children well. Some teachers use te reo Māori incidentally in their interactions with children. Adults’ respectful conversations acknowledge children's competence and empower them to make their own decisions. Infants and toddlers are provided with a safe and secure environment, and teachers' main focus is on encouraging children's communication and exploration.

Teachers plan collaboratively and are responsive to children's interests. Recent refinements to planning have strengthened teachers' focus on noticing, recognising and responding to children's individual interests and strengths. The principles and goals of Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum underpin and guide the curriculum. Teachers plan deliberately to integrate early literacy and mathematics concepts into the context of children's play. This is a deliberate focus to support the four year olds to transition more successfully to school.

Teachers integrate biculturalism and aspects of tikanga Māori into the programme and would like to continue to strengthen this in the centre. Portfolios show the development of each child's knowledge, skills and dispositions over time. The centre manager would like to continue to build consistency in the documentation and analysis of children's learning.

Parent involvement and participation in children's learning is encouraged and valued. Teachers provide a range of opportunities for parents to participate in the programme, share their aspirations and be aware of their child’s progress. Parents are pleased with the positive changes to the indoor and outdoor learning environments. The centre manager has identified the need to continue to increase parent contributions to children's learning and the curriculum.

The centre manager's decision making and improvements are all focused on improving outcomes for children. She is effectively building a cohesive and collaborative team. Teachers' leadership skills and areas of expertise are valued. Teachers spoke enthusiastically about the leader's positivity, passion for the work, and care. They are also proud of the changes and improvements to programme planning and the physical learning environment.

The centre owners have established a sound policy framework. Policies are visible in practice and are regularly reviewed. Self review is in the beginning stages and the centre owners and manager should continue to strengthen this in the centre. Strategic planning is in the beginning stages. The next steps are to develop a strategic plan that is more long term, and then each year develop an annual plan to implement chosen aspects of the strategic plan. The owner and centre manager would like to work collaboratively to continue to strengthen strategic planning and self-review.

Following a recent personnel management issue the centre owners appropriately plan to conduct a review of all governance and management systems in order to improve them and to ensure that they effectively promote the wellbeing of children and adults in the centre.

Key Next Steps

ERO recommends and centre leaders agree that key next steps should include:

  • increased celebration and integration of cultures in the curriculum
  • more use of teaching strategies that extend children's learning and engage them in more complex play
  • ensuring that teachers are provided with relevant professional learning and development to grow their professional practice
  • reviewing all governance and management systems, including personnel policies and procedures, including the appraisal system, to ensure that these are effective and meet legislative requirements.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of The Childrens Corner Papatoetoe completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

During the review, ERO identified areas of non-compliance. The service provider must

  • implement suitable personnel management policies and practices
  • regularly review all aspects of centre operation
  • ensure that all reasonable steps are taken to promote the wellbeing of children and adults in the service.

Licensing Criteria for Early Childhood Education and Care Centres 2008, GMA4, 6, 7.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of The Childrens Corner Papatoetoe will be in three years.

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

24 February 2016

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Papatoetoe, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

25391

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

50 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Service roll

48

Gender composition

Boys 31 Girls 17

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Indian

Samoan

Tongan

other

14

2

15

5

4

8

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

November 2015

Date of this report

24 February 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

July 2013

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.