Lollipops Educare Millennium

Education institution number:
25357
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
67
Telephone:
Address:

600 Great South Road, Ellerslie, Auckland

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1 Evaluation of Lollipops Educare Millennium

How well placed is Lollipops Educare Millennium to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Lollipops Educare Millennium, in Ellerslie, is licensed to provide education and care for 85 children, including up to 25 children aged under two years. Infants and toddlers each have their own play space. The two preschool rooms share their outdoor play area. Parents have the option of enrolling their children for sessional hours or full days.

The service operates in an office complex. Some children enrolled live in the residential community but most have parents who work in the complex or neighbouring businesses. The multicultural nature of the community is reflected in the teaching team.

The Evolve Education Group took ownership of the service in December 2014. The change of ownership did not negatively impact the teaching team, which has remained stable. The current centre director was appointed to a full time position in August of this year. She is supported by a team of four head teachers, and five other qualified teachers.

The philosophy of the service focuses on inclusion and respect for diversity. Respectful relationships with children and their whānau are recognised as the foundation on which to build an environment that supports children's learning. The layout and resourcing of the physical environment provide children with space to explore at their own pace and lead their own learning.

The 2013 ERO report identified busy, articulate, confident, and socially competent children, who were well supported by their teachers to become creative thinkers and independent learners. The environment and the development of early literacy skills were acknowledged as strengths, and children's interests were well used in programme planning. These positive aspects have been maintained. ERO suggested strengthening self review, policies and processes for transitioning children, the alignment of strategic planning with the philosophy, and the inclusion of parent contributions in the programme. There has been good progress in these areas. 

The Review Findings

The service's philosophy is very evident in the programme. Children freely explore the environment, investigating ideas and resources. Older children share their developing knowledge of the world with each other and teachers. Children are confident, articulate and have fun.

Teachers know and respect children's preferences and personalities. They support them to be self-managing, independent and to make decisions. Home languages are used with children and their whānau, supporting a sense of belonging at the centre and affirming children's identity, language and culture.

Teachers support children to be socially competent, respectful of the environment and of each other. The programme for infants and toddlers moves at a gentle pace in peaceful environments. Children's decisions about their individual routines and their daily programme are invited and respected.

Teachers genuinely listen to children, and use what they have learnt to build positive, sensitive and respectful relationships. They respond to children's interests in a variety of ways and encourage complexity in their learning through skilful questioning. Teamwork is evident throughout the centre.

Parents who spoke with ERO expressed their appreciation of the teachers and the individualised programme provided for their children. They particularly enjoyed how teachers communicated with them, sharing the learning and development of each child.

An effective process of recording and responding to children's interests and strengths is highly visible and drives the programme. Evaluation of the programme shows teacher reflection and growth. Te Whariki, the early childhood curriculum, is well embedded. Literacy and numeracy concepts are woven throughout centre programmes in meaningful ways.

Te reo and tikanga Māori are visible in the centre and teaching practice. Teachers use te reo in conversation with children, and use karakia and waiata appropriately and respectfully. The teaching team are now considering ways to extend and develop their knowledge of te ao Māori perspectives and how these can be more evident in their programmes.

The recent appointment of the centre director has been successful in lifting teaching practice and building a cohesive team. Strong leadership is driving a clear vision and inspiring team leaders. The current leadership structure is building capable leaders in internal evaluation and effective mentoring. An effective process of internal evaluation is in place and well supported by research. Relevant topics are chosen and the perspectives of children, whānau and teachers are invited and included.

Evolve provides up to date policies and procedures that guide practice. They also provide support personnel in the areas of business and curriculum. Individual centres are expected to develop strategic and annual plans to support the achievement of strategic goals. There are good links between this centre's strategic plan, internal evaluation and teacher appraisal. 

Key Next Steps

Centre leaders agree that key next steps for development include:

  • the establishment of quality indicators around strategic goals and a system to monitor progress towards the achievement of these goals

  • continuing to develop ways to help children to understand the diverse cultures of Aotearoa and to experience success in their own language, culture and identity.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Lollipops Educare Millennium completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Lollipops Educare Millennium will be in three years.

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

23 January 2017

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning. 

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service 

Location

Ellerslie, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

25357

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

85 children, including up to 25 aged under 2

Service roll

82

Gender composition

Girls 49 Boys 33

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Indian

Chinese

African

Filipino

Samoan

other

2

32

20

12

3

3

3

7

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

November 2016

Date of this report

23 January 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

 

Education Review

August 2013

Education Review

February 2010

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Lollipops Educare Millennium 2

How well placed is Lollipops Educare Millennium 2 to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Lollipops Educare Millennium 2 centre is situated on the ground floor of a commercial business complex in Ellerslie. The centre provides education and care for children over two years of age and most parents live or work locally. An adjacent centre within the same building caters for children up to two years of age. Lollipops Educare Millennium 2 is working to merge these two centres so that one licence covers both. They are reviewing policies and procedures to meet the 2008 Licensing Criteria.

In March 2013, Lollipops Educare Ltd took over full ownership of the centre and employed a centre director to oversee its operational aspects. A centre manager is responsible for its day-to-day functioning and administration. The stability of teaching staff is a feature of the centre, facilitating strong and ongoing relationships with the centre community.

The 2010 ERO report identified many positive features of the centre. These features included strong leadership, good literacy and numeracy learning opportunities for children, and a commitment to promoting biculturalism in the programme. These good features continue to be evident.

Te Whariki, New Zealand’s early childhood curriculum, guides the programme provided for children. Teaching programmes are based on children’s individual and group interests.

The Review Findings

Children are busy in the programme making choices about their play. They interact with activities provided and are able to access resources freely in accordance with their play preferences. Children are confident, articulate and can engage in uninterrupted play for prolonged periods of time. They form good friendships and show the capacity to play well on their own and with others in small groups.

Children’s oral language is well supported. They are good at initiating conversations and engage in interesting and imaginative dialogues. They participate well during mat times and are encouraged to revisit previous learning and share thoughts during these sessions.

Teachers act as facilitators of children's learning, helping them to become creative thinkers, and independent, active learners. They introduce a variety of activities to cater for the specific interests and cultural diversity of children and to promote an awareness and appreciation of te reo Māori and waiata.

Teachers have a good understanding of individual children's interests, abilities and needs. They plan programmes based on this information and make regular informal observations of children during session times. Children's emerging interests are recorded in portfolios information. This information, together with material provided by teachers about the value of play, contributes to parents’ understanding of their child’s learning and development.

The environment is resourced to foster children’s creativity and early science learning. Teachers promote children’s use of natural materials and science equipment to encourage exploration of the physical and natural world. Children enjoy opportunities to investigate new ideas. Areas of play are well defined and support children’s independent learning. Children know that adults will respond to their requests and support their interests.

Teachers conscientiously work to develop children’s early literacy learning. They provide a language-rich environment and many resources for children to practise early reading and writing skills. Teachers interact well with children and challenge them to think, solve problems and negotiate with each other. Parents feel supported and can see progress in their child’s learning and development.

Key Next Steps

ERO and centre managers agree that useful next steps for the centre are for managers and teachers to further develop and strengthen:

  • self-review processes and documentation of reviews undertaken
  • teachers’ planning for and assessment of individual children, particularly aspects showing parents/whānau contributions
  • the centre’s strategic and annual plan by aligning these to the centre’s philosophy and to the strategic vision of the wider Lollipops organisation
  • policy and procedures for transitioning children
  • understandings about and implementation of inclusive practices.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the management of Lollipops Educare Millennium 2 completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • administration
  • health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial and property management.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Lollipops Educare Millennium 2 will be in three years.

Graham Randell

National Manager Review Services Northern Region (Acting)

9 August 2013

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Ellerslie, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

25357

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Centres) Regulations 1998

Number licensed for

50 children, including up to 0 aged under 2

Service roll

46

Gender composition

Boys 25 Girls 21

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Indian

Chinese

Samoan

2

30

5

8

1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

Not applicable

 
 

Over 2

1:8

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

May 2013

Date of this report

9 August 2013

Most recent ERO report(s)

 

Education Review

February 2010

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.