Weymouth Playcentre

Education institution number:
25237
Service type:
Playcentre
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
16
Telephone:
Address:

516 Weymouth Road, Weymouth, Auckland

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1 Evaluation of Weymouth Playcentre

How well placed is Weymouth Playcentre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Weymouth Playcentre is a parent-led cooperative that is licensed for 25 children, including 20 children up to two years of age. It offers three sessions each week. The centre operates in a well-resourced building near Weymouth Primary School. The families enrolled come from surrounding areas. The centre has a strategic goal to increase member numbers.

All centre families are new since the 2015 ERO review. The centre has developed clear roles and responsibilities to guide centre members' practices. The leadership role is shared by two centre coordinators. Centre members work with the centre support worker (CSW) and a centre administrator (CA) to manage day-to-day operations, administration and the curriculum.

The centre's philosophy reflects Playcentre aspirations of whānau and children learning together. The programme is guided by Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum.

The 2015 ERO report noted that children are confident learners. The programme and adults' collaborative responses supported children to learn through inclusive mixed-age play. These good quality practices continue to be evident. Areas for improvement included self review, assessment, programme planning and evaluation, and the meaningful use of the centre's strategic plan. Centre members have continued to work on their practices in these areas, and have made positive progress.

Playcentre Aotearoa is in the process of restructuring, moving from 32 Associations to six regional offices. The Auckland region includes 45 centres from the former Auckland, Tamaki and Counties Playcentre Associations. A regional manager oversees governance, management and administration and has a team of staff to support individual centres. Centre whānau and regional staff are in a period of transition. Regional staff are helping whānau as they adapt to new systems and responsibilities.

This review was part of a cluster of six Playcentre reviews in the Auckland region.

The Review Findings

Centre families welcome, encourage and support new members as whānau and kaiako. Children are valued and respected as individuals and with their families, actively contribute to the programme. Children are keen explorers who test and develop their skills and confidence as they play and learn. They are able to move freely into the large outdoor area throughout sessions.

As a result of mixed-age groups, children have a strong sense of belonging and happily engage in activities for sustained periods. They converse enthusiastically with adults, who encourage their language development.

Good practices for infants and toddlers are well established, and well supported by quality resources that are easily accessed. Children are confident and independent, and trust that their whānau/kaiako are available to support them. They settle easily into the centre routines, and actively participate in them. Tuakana/teina relationships are a natural part of this centre.

Whānau/kaiako build relationships and cultural connections that support everyone to feel that they have a place. These whānau relationships help children to engage with learning and become confident and connected learners. Te reo and tikanga Māori are valued and woven through the programme. Whanaungatanga and manaakitanga are strongly evident in the programme and interactions.

Children have opportunities to choose, lead their own learning, and make decisions about their play. They regularly interact with the variety of activities that promote literacy, mathematics, technology, and science. Whānau/kaiako have developed systems that capture and record children's learning and development. They use this information to further plan for children. They are now aware of the importance of having a variety of perspectives about each child's learning in their portfolio.

Centre members are developing their confidence in the use of internal evaluation. They recognise that this helps to improve learning opportunities and outcomes for tamariki.

Collaborative leadership provides opportunities for all centre members to extend and share their knowledge and skills. Newly appointed regional personnel are making progress building on existing systems and establishing regional management structures for supporting centres. Centre support workers are guided by regional centre support coordinators. Systems are being developed for monitoring the quality of programmes for children, adult education levels, and health and safety requirements.

The regional management team takes responsibility for specific tasks relating to the effective operation of individual centres. The team is aware of the unique strengths and needs of each centre and provides professional leadership to sustain improvement, growth and the focus on fostering positive learning outcomes for children.

Key Next Steps

Centre members agree that their next steps are to continue to:

  • improve the visibility and promotion of their commitment to te ao Māori

  • include children's and other adults' contributions in learning stories

  • promoting more independence and self-management skills for children

  • continuing to strengthen internal evaluation in all areas of operations.

In order to improve and strengthen practice the regional leaders should continue to:

  • revisit the commitment to Te Tiriti partnership, and to increase bicultural understandings and the integration of te reo me ōna tikanga Māori in centre practices

  • clarify and upskill centre support roles

  • build regional office capability to embed new adult education programmes and qualifications

  • improve the understanding and use of internal evaluation as a tool to guide practices

  • develop, evaluate and report against regional long-term and annual action plans that align with goals for improvement at national and regional levels

  • embed the new Playcentre structure and systems and evaluate how effectively they support all children, including Pacific children and children with additional needs.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Weymouth Playcentre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Weymouth Playcentre will be in three years.

Julie Foley

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

Te Tai Raki - Northern Region

29 August 2018

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Weymouth, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

25237

Licence type

Playcentre

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

25 children, including up to 20 aged under 2

Service roll

9

Gender composition

Boys 5 Girls 4

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā

8
1

Percentage of qualified teachers

Parent Led

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

June 2018

Date of this report

29 August 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

February 2015

Education Review

February 2011

Education Review

August 2007

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Weymouth Playcentre

How well placed is Weymouth Playcentre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Weymouth Playcentre is one of 16 centres in the Tamaki Playcentres Association. The centre is governed by the Association which provides a management and policy framework to guide centre operations. Liaison officers and other Association staff provide support for centres, including adult education programmes to encourage children’s learning.

Weymouth Playcentre operates as a parent cooperative under the guidance and support of the Tamaki Playcentre Association. A key feature of Playcentre is that children and parents learn alongside one another and promote the philosophy of the parents as first teachers of their children. The playcentre is licensed to cater for up to 25 children, including up to 20 infants and toddlers. The centre is open for three morning sessions each week. Centre practices reflect the aspirations stated in the playcentre’s philosophy.

The centre is part of a multi-cultural community. Many families attending identify as Māori. Bicultural practices are a strength of the centre. An inclusive culture and good links with the local community foster positive outcomes for children and families.

The Playcentre Association is currently undergoing a structural review to streamline its systems, policies and practices and promote the long-term sustainability of the organisation. A key priority is to encourage and support Playcentre members to take an active role in the governance of the organisation at the Association level.

Since the 2011 ERO review the premises have undergone substantial interior renovations. Centre leaders have been well supported by the Association to maintain the good practices identified at that time and to respond to the recommendations noted in the ERO report. The qualification levels of members have increased.

This review was part of a cluster of eight playcentre reviews in the Tamaki Playcentre Association.

The Review Findings

Children are settled, engaged in their play and demonstrate a good sense of belonging in the centre. They develop strong friendships with each other. There are strong tuakana-teina interactions among the mixed age groups. Children confidently initiate play and have opportunities for choice and decision making.

Parents/whānau are positive and encouraging in their interactions with children. They value children’s play and conversations and are responsive to their strengths and interests. Adults support the development of literacy, mathematics and science through play. Good systems are in place to develop and extend children’s individual and group interests. Parents/whānau are continuing to develop strategies to further enhance their assessment and planning practices.

Programmes are underpinned by the Playcentre philosophy and Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum. The 'notice, recognise and respond' approach is evident in documentation and in practice. Association support personnel and centre members are continuing to develop planning approaches to strengthen the role of adults in supporting and extending children's ongoing learning.

Bicultural practices and perspectives are very evident in the programme and learning environment. Centre members have made good use of professional development opportunities and the skills and knowledge of more experienced members to increase their capability and confidence in this area. They use te reo Māori naturally and in ways that recognise it as a living language.

The centre is well resourced. The environment offers challenge and invites exploration and choices. Members are flexible in their use of the environment and resources to provide developmentally appropriate learning experiences for children of all ages. Members are planning to further develop the spacious outdoor area to enhance their use of natural materials, environmental programmes, and outdoor physical challenges.

Infants and toddlers are confident in the environment. Appropriate spaces are provided for their play and care. Older children are well provided for, including equipment and space for physical challenge. Centre leaders liaise with the neighbouring school and with other local early childhood education centres, and are continuing to develop a range of ways in which they can effectively support children’s transition to school.

Parents/whānau take collective responsibility for the children. They learn together in ako relationships and have a collaborative approach to managing the centre. Centre members are encouraged to continue their participation in higher levels of training. They have accessed support from the Association and other professional development providers to strengthen teaching and learning practices. Leaders promote the Playcentre vision and philosophy, and work collaboratively and strategically to build the capability of newer members. They are considering ways to ensure the sustainability of these good practices.

The Association’s three year strategic plan outlines goals relevant to all centres. An annual centre management plan guides current decision making and development. In recent years the liaison officer has helped leaders in this centre to develop a framework for a centre-based strategic plan, to more comprehensively reflect their long-term thinking. Centre leaders should now further develop and implement this strategic plan to support and sustain progress towards longer term centre goals.

Informal self review is ongoing in the centre. Some outcomes are documented through planning and evaluation processes and through regular audits. Centre leaders recognise that they are still at the early stages of self review and want to now develop more robust and useful processes. Planned professional development should provide timely support for the centre to achieve their improvement goals in this area.

Association management policies are well established. Heightening awareness of Playcentre within the community is an on-going focus of the Association. Centre members report that the Association is very responsive to requests for support and guidance to manage the centre. The Association could now consider ways to further support centres to provide quality programmes for children and to promote improvement in effective centres.

Key Next Steps

Centre members agree that key steps to support ongoing centre improvement and enhance sustainability are:

  • continuing to develop consistency in the quality of learning interactions and using self review to evaluate the effectiveness of practices
  • improving the documentation for planning and evaluation processes to more clearly show children’s learning over time and to enable a shared understanding so that all members can participate fully
  • further developing and documenting self review as a purposeful tool to build centre members’ capacity for ongoing improvement
  • reviewing the framework for the centre strategic plan, and using it as an ongoing working document.

The cluster review has identified areas of governance and management for the Association to address. These include:

  • strengthening strategic planning and self review practices
  • re-establishing performance management systems for all employed staff
  • ensuring liaison officers and licensing support workers contribute more effectively to improving the quality of programmes in centres.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Weymouth Playcentre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Weymouth Playcentre will be in three years.

Dale Bailey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

11 February 2015

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Weymouth, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

25237

Licence type

Playcentre

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

25 children, including up to 20 aged under 2

Service roll

24

Gender composition

Girls 13 Boys 11

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Samoan

Indian

Indonesian

17

1

3

2

1

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

September 2014

Date of this report

11 February 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

February 2011

 

Education Review

August 2007

 

Education Review

June 2004

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.