8's Enuff

Education institution number:
25195
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
19
Telephone:
Address:

4 Sarah Place, Pakuranga, Auckland

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1 Evaluation of 8's Enuff

How well placed is 8's Enuff to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

8’s Enuff is a small privately owned centre in a well-established residential area in Farm Cove,
East Auckland. It provides a sessional and full day service for up to 15 children at a time, aged between two and five years of age. The centre is staffed by two qualified teachers and the centre owner. The team has remained the same since the 2015 ERO review. Teachers have a shared philosophical belief in children learning through play, with a strong focus on literacy and numeracy.

The 2015 ERO report commented positively on relationships between staff, children and families. Teachers have addressed ERO's recommendations for improvements to the programme and management practices. External professional development to strengthen curriculum planning has motivated teachers and improved practice. Children's wellbeing continues to be promoted.

The Review Findings

Children learn in a home-like, attractive and well-resourced environment. The centre is organised in response to children's interests and to encourage them to try new activities. Children have many opportunities to include literacy, mathematics and science as part of their play and discussions. They are encouraged to be creative and expressive though art, music, dance and dramatic play. Regular excursions into the community support children's physical development and maintain local connections.

Children are confident communicators, who play cooperatively for long periods. They have fun, are imaginative and investigative, and experience challenge and success. Children have a strong sense of belonging, are developing friendships and show concern for others. They are eager to learn and benefit from doing so at an individualised pace in a calm environment.

Teachers’ sensitive and supportive interactions underpin children’s high levels of engagement in the programme. Teachers affirm and build on children’s strengths. They listen carefully to children, support sustained conversations and encourage children to problem solve. Child-led learning is valued and purposefully extended.

Respectful and responsive relationships, and a good knowledge of Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum, underpin programmes. With external support, teachers have developed sound group planning processes to guide programme implementation. Vibrant displays show how children are involved in learning. Children's assessment portfolios document children’s individual progress and learning well.

Teachers’ capabilities and leadership are fostered through ongoing professional development. The centre owner and teachers have a genuine commitment to the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Biculturalism is fostered through meaningful opportunities for children to become familiar with te reo and tikanga Māori and to learn about te ao Māori through play. These practices are well documented through learning stories and other programme records.

Families are well informed about their children’s progress and provide positive feedback about the education and care their children receive. Teachers are very responsive to parental aspirations and encourage a sense of partnership. They value this as an integral part of early childhood education. Teachers have good links with the local schools and other facilities. Children’s transitions into the centre and to school are responsive to individual children and whānau needs.

Engagement with advisory support has had a positive impact on centre management practices, including the documentation of strategic and annual plans. There are effective systems to monitor health and safety.

Key Next Steps

The centre owner and teachers agree that next steps should include:

  • restating their vision and strategic goals to guide centre direction and inform action plans and a cycle of review
  • strengthening internal evaluation to include greater depth in research and evidence, and alignment to strategic direction
  • refining the teacher appraisal process to meet the requirements of the Education Council of NZ
  • deepening teachers' evaluation of the effectiveness of their teaching practice and programmes for children
  • evaluating how well teaching strategies and practices respond to children's cultural identities and home languages.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of 8's Enuff completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of 8's Enuff will be in three years. 

Steffan Brough
Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

22 May 2017 

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning. 

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service 

Location

Pakuranga, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

25195

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

15 children, over 2 years of age

Service roll

26

Gender composition

Girls       13
Boys      13

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Asian
other

  3
15
  4
  4

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49%       50-79%       80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:5

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

March 2017

Date of this report

22 May 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

 

Education Review

January 2015

Education Review

June 2012

Education Review

February 2009

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau. 

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service. 

1 Evaluation of 8's Enuff

How well placed is 8's Enuff to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

8’s Enuff is an early childhood service that is currently in a period of change and development. External support is needed to improve its curriculum, self review and bicultural practices.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

8’s Enuff, located at Farm Cove, Pakuranga, provides sessional and full day care for children over two years of age. The centre is licensed to cater for up to 15 children and offers a home-like learning environment.

The centre is well supported by the local community. It is staffed by two qualified teachers. The outdoor area is presently under review with a view to providing increased opportunities for children's learning and extending children’s interests.

The Review Findings

The centre’s long-standing positive features have been sustained. Teachers successfully promote children’s sense of wellbeing. Children are warmly welcomed on arrival and most settle quickly to selfselected activities. They work and play happily alongside and with each other, enjoying activities provided by teachers.

Teachers encourage children’s independence and respond positively to their requests for resources and support. They promote children’s language development, particularly those children with English as an additional language.

Parents express appreciation for the programme provided for children. They are beginning to contribute to children’s portfolios. Parents respond positively to surveys and requests for information about their children.

Teachers work well together. The high ratio of teachers to children enables teachers to connect well with children and support children's engagement in activities. A useful next step would be for teachers to reflect more deeply about the quality and content of programmes provided for children.

Some teachers use open-ended questioning well to support children’s thinking or to reinforce children’s knowledge. Teachers should now improve the quality and content of their questioning in ways that encourage children to lead their own learning.

Teachers use some te reo Māori with children. Children respond to instructions and are beginning to understand words and phrases. Teachers could now reflect their commitment to providing bicultural learning for all children and increase their focus on this aspect of the programme. Learning more about the history of the local area, and strengthening tikanga practices would make their commitment more visible.

Self-review is not yet leading to programmes that provide sufficient challenge and complexity for children’s learning. Assessment processes should positively celebrate children’s achievements and identify their individual interests more clearly. This would allow teachers to plan programmes that support children’s interests, ideas and thinking skills.

Management processes need improvement. Most documentation is not yet providing a picture of the owner’s intentions for the effective operation of the centre. The strategic plan is not closely linked to the annual plan, and further work is needed to develop cohesive systems and processes for managing the centre.

Appraisal processes do not include the Registered Teachers Criteria. Teachers are not currently engaged with induction and mentoring programmes that enable them to gain full teacher registration. Engagement in these programmes should help teachers to further develop their teaching practice in line with current theories of quality teaching. Professional development should be linked to teachers’ appraisal goals and the centre's professional learning needs.

Key Next Steps

The centre owner and teachers agree that next key steps include:

  • seeking external support for improving and updating learning programmes, assessment and planning systems, self review and management procedures and documentation.

As part of this work, they should:

  • link curriculum practices more clearly to Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum
  • use quality indicators to strengthen self-review processes
  • include a commitment to bicultural practice in centre documentation and programmes.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of 8's Enuff completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

Actions for compliance

ERO identified areas of non-compliance relating to curriculum programmes and bicultural practice. To meet requirements the owner must:

  • plan, implement and evaluate programmes based on Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum
  • provide programmes that identify Māori as tangata whenua and provide information for children about the dual cultural heritages of New Zealand .

Licensing Criteria for Early Childhood Education and Care Centres 2008, Education (ECS) Regulations 2008, 43(1a)

The centre is now aware of the need to ensure all staff are regularly police vetted.

Development Plan Recommendation

ERO recommends that the service consult with the Ministry of Education and plan to address the key next steps and actions outlined in this report.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of 8's Enuff will be within two years.

Dale Bailey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

23 January 2015

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Pakuranga, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

25195

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

15 children, including up to 0 aged under 2

Service roll

36

Gender composition

Boys 21

Girls 15

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Chinese

1

29

6

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80% Based on funding rates

50-79%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:5

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

November 2014

Date of this report

23 January 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

June 2012

 

Education Review

February 2009

 

Education Review

June 2006

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.