Clevedon Kidz Early Childhood Centre

Education institution number:
25057
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
57
Telephone:
Address:

Main Road, Clevedon

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ERO’s Akanuku | Assurance Review reports provide information about whether a service meets and maintains regulatory standards. Further information about Akanuku | Assurance Reviews is included at the end of this report.

ERO’s Judgement

Regulatory standards

ERO’s judgement

Curriculum

Meeting

Premises and facilities

Meeting

Health and safety

Not meeting

Governance, management and administration

Not meeting

At the time of the review, ERO identified areas of non-compliance with regulatory standards that are an unacceptable risk to children.

Background

Clevedon Kidz Early Childhood Centre is a semi-rural, community-based service governed by the Clevedon Presbyterian Church. The philosophy is based on Christian values. A centre manager leads a team of six qualified and five unqualified teachers. There are three rooms for different age groups of children. Twenty percent of children enrolled are Māori.

Summary of Review Findings

Adults engage in meaningful, positive interactions to enhance children’s learning and nurture reciprocal relationships. The service curriculum respects and supports the right of each child to be confident in their own culture and encourages children to understand and respect other cultures. Children have a range of experiences and opportunities to enhance and extend their learning and development individually and in groups.

The service’s premises do not meet regulatory standards and an increased level of monitoring of health and safety practices is required. Governance and management systems, and ongoing self review that supports improvement, have not yet been established.

Actions for Compliance

ERO found areas of non-compliance in the service relating to:

  • maintaining evidence of daily checking of equipment, premises and facilities for hazards to children
  • ensuring all children’s workers who have access to children are safety checked in accordance with the Children’s Act 2014.

Licensing Criteria for Early Childhood Education and Care Centres 2008, HS12, GMA7A.

Since the onsite visit the service has provided ERO with evidence that shows it has addressed the following non-compliances:

  • having sufficient spaces for equipment and material to be stored safely (PF8)
  • having a safe and effective means of maintaining a room temperature of no lower than 16oC at 500mm above the floor while children are attending (PF12)
  • providing nappy changing facilities for children under two years of age that can be kept hygienically clean (PF25)
  • providing a designated sleep space for children under two years of age (PF37)
  • securing heavy furniture and equipment that could fall or topple and cause serious injury (HS6)
  • maintaining emergency supplies that are sufficient for the age and number of children and adults at the service (HS7)
  • undertaking an annual review of how evaluation of emergency drills has informed the review of the service’s emergency plan (HS8)
  • ensuring furniture intended for children to sleep on is hygienically stored when not in use (HS11)
  • ensuring safe and hygienic handling practices are implemented with regard to any animals at the service (HS16)
  • ensuring assessment and management of risk is undertaken when children leave the premises on excursions, and that a person responsible gives written approval for excursions to take place (HS17)
  • maintaining consistent records of parental acknowledgement when medication is administered to children (HS28)
  • maintaining evidence of opportunities provided for parents to contribute to the development and review of the service’s operational documents (GMA4)
  • implementing suitable human resource management practices, including selection and appointment procedures, and a definition of serious misconduct and discipline/dismissal procedures (GMA7).

Recommendation to Ministry of Education

ERO recommends that the Ministry reassess the licence issued to this service provider. ERO will not undertake a further review of this service until the Ministry of Education is satisfied that the service meets regulatory standards.

Next ERO Review

The next ERO review will be in consultation with the Ministry of Education.

Steve Tanner
Director Review and Improvement Services (Northern)
Northern Region | Te Tai Raki

7 July 2021 

Information About the Service

Early Childhood Service Name Clevedon Kidz Early Childhood Centre
Profile Number 25057
Location Clevedon, Auckland

Service type

Education and care service

Number licensed for

50 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Percentage of qualified teachers

80%+

Service roll

57

Ethnic composition

Māori 11
NZ European/Pākehā 44
other ethnic groups 2

Review team on site

May 2021

Date of this report

7 July 2021

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, August 2017
Education Review, October 2013

General Information about Assurance Reviews

All services are licensed under the Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008. The legal requirements for early childhood services also include the Licensing Criteria for Education and Care Services 2008.

Services must meet the standards in the regulations and the requirements of the licensing criteria to gain and maintain a licence to operate.

ERO undertakes an Akanuku | Assurance Review process in any centre-based service:

  • having its first ERO review – including if it is part of a governing organisation
  • previously identified as ‘not well placed’ or ‘requiring further development’
  • that has moved from a provisional to a full licence
  • that have been re-licenced due to a change of ownership
  • where an Akanuku | Assurance Review process is determined to be appropriate.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

All early childhood services are required to promote children’s health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements. Before the review, the staff and management of a service completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

As part of an Akanuku | Assurance Review ERO assesses whether the regulated standards are being met. In particular, ERO looks at a service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher certification; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

As part of an Akanuku | Assurance Review ERO also gathers and records evidence through:

  • discussions with those involved in the service
  • consideration of relevant documentation, including the implementation of health and safety systems
  • observations of the environment/premises, curriculum implementation and teaching practice.

1 Evaluation of Clevedon Kidz Early Childhood Centre

How well placed is Clevedon Kidz Early Childhood Centre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Clevedon Kidz Early Childhood Centre is licensed to provide full day education and care for 50 children including up to 15 under two years old. It largely caters for children aged up to four and operates in conjunction with the nearby Clevedon Kidz Get Set 4 School centre for four year olds. The centre provides for children in three age-related groups, although the two older groups frequently mix and share an outdoor environment. The enrolled children are mostly Pākehā and there are also small numbers with Māori or other cultural heritage.

The service is community based and affiliated to the Clevedon Presbyterian Church. A Resource Committee and an Operations Manager govern the centre, while day to day management is delegated to the centre manager and three team leaders. The service is founded on Christian principles and a philosophy that embraces bicultural practices, positive community relationships and high expectations for children's learning.

Seven of the large teaching team are registered teachers. Several staff have been at the centre for many years. They have established strong links with the community and know families well. Teachers have maintained a commitment to ongoing professional development, and knowledge of current trends in early childhood practices. They have goals to develop cultural diversity within the centre.

In 2013 ERO endorsed many positive aspects of the service including the quality of relationships, support for children's language development, provision for infants and centre management. These features continue to be evident in practice. Centre leaders and teachers have responded well to ERO’s suggestions for improvements, especially in relation to enhancing the focus on child initiated learning and aligning programmes with Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum. 

The Review Findings

Christian values and caring relationships underpin the welcoming centre environment. Children arrive eager to play and connect with their friends. They confidently engage in activities that interest them and are developing group skills through their imaginative play. They benefit from well resourced environments and very good access to outdoor play. Children are capable learners who respond well to skilful teachers who support their interests. Meaningful opportunities for children to enjoy Māori language, waiata and karakia help all children become familiar with the bicultural heritage of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Children under two are confident explorers. They enjoy good access to a variety of suitable resources and creative experiences. They are eager to play outside and they show persistence when confronted with difficult tasks. Teachers support toddlers well to become independent and cooperative learners.

Teachers actively encourage children to develop their play. They ask open-ended questions that prompt children to think and explore their ideas. Teachers expect children to work cooperatively, sustain meaningful play and show respect for each other. They know children well and share genuine conversations that foster language development. Teachers have integrated many opportunities for children to learn early literacy and numeracy skills in appropriate, playful contexts. They have established smooth transitions for children within the centre and to the Get Set 4 School centre.

Teachers plan programmes to respond to children's interests. While this planning has largely focused on group interests, one team has recently developed a format to focus on individual children. This is a good model for other teams to follow as it includes parents' aspirations and better guidance for teachers to extend learning. Teachers could also consider ways to become more critical in their evaluations of the programme to help them reflect on the effectiveness of their planned teaching strategies.

As part of their ongoing professional development it may be useful for teachers to take leadership roles in curriculum areas such as literacy, numeracy and science. This could help them to develop the complexity of children's learning experiences and deepen their own curriculum knowledge.

Parents are valued partners in the centre. They are well informed about programmes for children, are consulted during policy reviews, and are invited to share information about their family's cultural identity. Parents actively support centre events, and some have begun contributing to their children's learning plans. A planned initiative to provide a digital portal for families to access children's learning stories should increase parents' feedback on their children's learning experiences.

The centre is well managed. There is a sound management structure and the centre manager provides effective leadership for staff. Teachers' evaluation is guiding improvements in their practice and they collaborate to manage programmes for children. Governance priorities to respond to community needs and provide high quality education for children continue to motivate centre leaders and staff. 

Key Next Steps

Centre leaders agree that the next key steps for developing the service include:

  • revising the strategic plan to further develop implementation and evaluation processes

  • strengthening internal evaluation at governance level to enhance awareness of the centre's performance

  • continuing to develop teacher appraisal processes to more effectively meet the requirements of the Education Council

  • enhancing programme planning throughout the centre to support more deliberate extension of children's learning

  • using measurable goals in the strategic plan to foster the ongoing growth of bicultural practice.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Clevedon Kidz Early Childhood Centre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Clevedon Kidz Early Childhood Centre will be in three years.

Violet Tu’uga Stevenson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

18 August 2017

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning. 

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service 

Location

Clevedon, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

25057

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

50 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Service roll

75

Gender composition

Girls 38, Boys 37

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Asian
African
Latin American

8
57
4
4
2

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:7

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

July 2017

Date of this report

18 August 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

 

Education Review

October 2013

Education Review

November 2013

Education Review

November 2007

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.