South Makirikiri School

We maintain a regular review programme to evaluate and report on the education and care of young people in schools.

We are in the process of shifting from event-based external reviews to supporting each school in a process of continuous improvement.

There may be delays between reviews for some schools and kura due to Covid-19 and while we transition to our new way of reviewing.

Read more about our new processes and why we changed the way we review schools and kura.

Find out which schools have upcoming reviews.

School Context

South Makirikiri School, located in the rural farming area south of Marton, caters for 138 students in Years 1 to 8. Of the learners enrolled, a small number identify as Māori.

Since the April 2015 ERO report, there have been several changes to the board, leadership and staff. There is a new principal in place in 2018.

The school vision of ‘learning is our treasure to seek and share for life’ is underpinned by the values of respect, perseverance, integrity, empathy and aiming high. The school’s valued outcomes are defined under their four key stepping stones of seeker, sorter, shaper and sharer.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • achievement in reading, writing and mathematics

  • progress and achievement against annual planning goals

  • student wellbeing.

The school is part of the South Rangitikei Kāhui Ako, and a staff member is an across-school lead teacher.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

Since 2015, the school’s achievement data indicates that the large majority of students, including Māori, achieve at or above the school’s expectations in reading, writing and mathematics. In 2017 most students achieved well in mathematics.

There continues to be significant disparity overall for boys in reading and writing. Reported data shows almost all Year 8 leavers, including boys, achieve at or above school expectations in reading, writing and mathematics.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those students who need this?

The school does not currently report on accelerated progress.

School data shows many students at risk in their learning made progress towards expectations in reading and maths. The majority made greater than expected progress. Frequent changes in senior leadership means there is an incomplete picture of progress of individuals, groups and cohorts over recent years.

Students with additional learning needs are identified and well supported through individual planning and monitoring, consultation with families and referral to external agencies when appropriate.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

The school curriculum effectively promotes an inclusive learning environment that responds to student needs and supports their wellbeing and learning. Relationships among students and teachers are positive and respectful. There are clear expectations for teaching and students are supported to participate and engage in learning. The current review of the curriculum is enhancing the focus on te ao Māori and establishing links with local iwi and the wider community.

The school is well resourced for learning and school activities and events are well supported by the community. The wide range of opportunities available for children include cultural, academic, sporting, leadership and community activities.

Trustees and leaders have a clear focus on growing capacity and capability. Teachers are collaborative and share strategies to enhance good practice. The school’s appraisal system has undergone changes since the previous ERO review and comprehensive documentation supports this process. Professional learning opportunities are continuing to enhance teacher knowledge and expertise.

Leaders of learning are identified within the school, and opportunities are provided to build internal leadership capability. There is a commitment to the wider Kāhui Ako that should continue to strengthen the school’s practices and support them to promote equity and excellence for their students.

Board members have accessed a wide range of professional learning that has enabled them to develop a shared understanding of their roles and responsibilities. There is a clear strategic focus on student achievement and improving outcomes for all learners.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

It is timely to review schoolwide assessment practices across all learning areas. Purposeful use of a range of assessment tools and information, particularly in writing, should further enable teachers, leaders and the board to measure progress against valued outcomes, recognise and address disparity, and monitor, track and analyse achievement of children. Ensuring that assessment involves student input should support children to take further ownership of their learning

Leaders and teachers are reflective and improvement focused. Further developing a shared understanding and use of robust internal evaluation should better determine what works and what is needed to sustain ongoing improvement for achievement of equity and excellence.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

In order to improve current practice trustees and leaders shoulddevelop guidelines for second language learning and career education for Years 7 and 8.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • a broad based curriculum that supports engagement and achievement

  • an inclusive learning environment that responds to student needs and supports their wellbeing and learning.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • developing meaningful schoolwide, consistent assessment processes to address disparity and accelerate learning for at risk learners

  • strengthening internal evaluation processes and practices

[ERO will provide an internal evaluation workshop for trustees and senior leaders.]

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in three years.

Patricia Davey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

7 June 2018

About the school

Location

Marton

Ministry of Education profile number

2446

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

138

Gender composition

Female 52%, Male 48%

Ethnic composition

Māori 4%
Pākehā 92%
Tongan 3%
Other ethnic groups 1%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

April 2018

Date of this report

7 June 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, April 2015
Education Review, September 2010
Education Review, May 2007

Findings

Students are well supported to be successful learners and leaders. The vision for 21st Century learning clearly underpins the curriculum and priorities for development. The school enjoys active support from its parent community. Strengthening processes for self review should assist in evaluating the impact of interventions, initiatives and practices for identified learners.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

South Makirikiri School caters for students from Years 1 to 8 in the rural farming area, south of Marton. At the time of this review there are 154 students. Currently there is an enrolment zone in place.

The school enjoys active support from its parent community. A Friends of the School group provides fundraising and support for events and contributes to the welfare of members of the school community.

A range of property developments has occurred including upgrades to classrooms, a new library and improvements to the playground. There is a strong commitment by trustees to providing digital technology for learning and teaching. Learners in senior classes have one-to-one access to digital devices.

In 2014 a new principal was appointed. Two new teachers joined the teaching team in 2015. Most trustees are long-serving members of the board.

South Makirikiri School has a positive ERO reporting history.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school makes good use of assessment information to make positive changes to learners’ progress and achievement.

School data shows that most students achieve at or above in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Many students leave Year 8 achieving highly. Teachers have appropriately identified mathematics as an area for improvement. They acknowledge the need to strengthen schoolwide processes and moderation for making overall teacher judgements, particularly for reading and mathematics.

Student achievement data is appropriately used to identify and plan for target students. A recently introduced approach to collaboratively developing targets has increased staff and trustees' commitment and focus to improve outcomes for identified learners.

Teachers provide additional support for learners with identified learning needs. Improving systems for tracking and monitoring individuals should support teachers' inquiry into the effectiveness of their practice in promoting progress of target students. Regular reporting to the board on progress towards targets should assist in ongoing decision making.

Leaders collate and analyse assessment information to explore trends and patterns. Further inquiring into patterns of achievement over time for groups of students as they move through the school, should help leaders track progress and evaluate the effectiveness of actions and strategies.

Teachers provide good support for students to understand their own progress and learning through promoting their involvement in assessment and goal setting. Assessment resources have been developed to assess curriculum progress and determine students’ next steps. These are useful for supporting student-led learning and progression of learning as they continue through the school.

Teachers make clear and useful judgments about students’ progress, achievement and next steps to report to parents.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The well-established curriculum vision for inquiry learning continues to guide teaching and learning. Students are supported to contribute to and lead their learning through the model of 'Seek, Sort, Shape, Share' and a range of rich and meaningful experiences. Ongoing review ensures the curriculum is relevant to students. Incorporating local-based aspects in the curriculum is a next step.

The inquiry model provides good support for learning and teaching. It promotes integration of learning areas and helps to develop students’ thinking skills. Teachers are working to further integrate and embed inquiry in learning and teaching.

Positive, respectful relationships are evident throughout the school. Students work productively with others. They learn in settled and inclusive environments. Classrooms are well organised and resourced to support student engagement in learning. Digital technology is integral to learning. Teachers use a range of effective strategies to invite students to engage and contribute to their learning. Staff work in teams to share and develop their practice.

Teachers are responsive to the feedback and ideas of students. Their leadership is fostered through a range of meaningful opportunities. Students are confident to contribute and participate in learning and school life.

A new schedule has been developed to strengthen review and reporting of curriculum areas. Review of curriculum implementation currently occurs through schoolwide monitoring of planning, classroom observations and discussion with teachers. Collating and analysing findings should further contribute to evaluation of curriculum effectiveness. Leaders plan to review and further develop mathematics to ensure that learning and teaching is relevant and reflects best practice.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

A long-established strategic plan has been in place to guide development in this area. It is timely to review this plan in consultation with whānau and iwi to establish a clear vision for success as Māori and determine directions for development.

Māori students experience success. They make good progress in their learning and many achieve well. Students have opportunities to learn about aspects of te ao Māori through the curriculum. Teachers are working to improve their understanding of te reo m ngā tikanga Māori to ensure their practice promotes the language, culture and identity of students.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school’s vision for 21st Century learning clearly underpins direction and priorities for development. The school is well placed to sustain its performance and promote improvement.

Trustees and school leaders value their community, teachers and students. They provide responsive support for the wellbeing and learning of students and teachers. The board shows sustained commitment to supporting the school and its identified priorities. Students are consulted and listened to.

Strategic goals and the annual plan provide useful frameworks for operation and for review of subsequent actions. A recently introduced approach to review and development of the charter is strengthening collaboration between trustees and staff and contributing to a shared understanding of priorities.

Leaders actively promote the school’s focus on target students. They are working to develop collaborative practices and clarify their roles and responsibilities. Useful systems for communication, curriculum implementation and reporting are in place. Processes for staff appraisal and teaching inquiry are being strengthened.

School leaders recognise the need to establish clear and aligned processes for self review. This should enable them to better evaluate the impact and significance of interventions, initiatives and practices, especially for students at risk of not achieving.

Families are welcomed and their participation in school life and their children’s learning is highly valued. There is a considered approach to students’ transition into school, and on to secondary school. Practices are responsive to the needs of students and their families.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Students are well supported to be successful learners and leaders. The vision for 21st Century learning clearly underpins the curriculum and priorities for development. The school enjoys active support from its parent community. Strengthening processes for self review should assist in evaluating the impact of interventions, initiatives and practices for identified learners.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.Image removed.

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

24 April 2015

About the School

Location

Marton

Ministry of Education profile number

2446

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

154

Gender composition

Female 52%

Male 48%

Ethnic composition

Pākehā

Māori

African

Other ethnic groups

90%

5%

2%

3%

Review team on site

February 2015

Date of this report

24 April 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

September 2010

May 2007

June 2004