Mosston School

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Education institution number:
2403
School type:
Contributing
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
146
Telephone:
Address:

211 Mosston Road, Westmere, Whanganui

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School Context

Mosston School is situated in Whanganui. The school caters for students in Years 1 to 6. The roll of 172 students includes 30% Māori learners.

The vision of the school is to nurture positive relationships and create lifelong learners.

Achievement targets for 2018 are focused on accelerating the progress of students requiring acceleration to meet expectations and achieve excellence in reading, writing and mathematics. 

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, school wide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • achievement, progress and targets in reading, writing, and mathematics in relation to curriculum expectations
  • attendance and wellbeing
  • the impact of teaching approaches and additional programmes in relation to progress and achievement.

Accelerated Literacy Learning (ALL), Accelerated Learning in Mathematics (ALiM), mathematics and digital technologies are Ministry of Education (MoE) funded initiatives undertaken by the school since the February 2016 ERO report. 

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

Mosston School achieves equity and excellence for students. Most achieve well in reading, writing, and mathematics, with approximately a third of students above expectations in reading and mathematics. Māori children achieve well. An identified disparity for boys, when compared to girls in writing, is significantly reduced over time, and generally addressed by the end of Year 6.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school responds effectively to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. In 2018, nearly all students targeted in reading, writing and mathematics made expected progress, with many showing acceleration in their achievement. 

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Well-developed processes and practices effectively address student needs. Achievement targets are based on detailed analysis of assessments. Tracking, monitoring and reporting systems are comprehensive. Regular, collaborative staff review of student progress ensures the needs of learners are continually updated to inform a relevant response.

Reciprocal, learning-centred relationships are fostered between parents, families and whānau. External specialist support is accessed to ensure the complex learning needs of identified students are addressed. Trustees align resources well to meet their priorities in relation to student progress, achievement and wellbeing. Thorough strategic and annual planning effectively guides school direction.

The documented and enacted curriculum is well designed to achieve the vision and values of the school and community. Detailed documentation guides delivery of shared expectations for teaching and learning. Māori learners’ culture, language and identity are valued and te ao Māori is evident across curriculum experiences. Teachers encourage the development of specific skills and attributes fostering a positive and purposeful learning culture. Contextual learning opportunities, including the inclusion of digital technologies, supports delivery of the curriculum to reflect the interests of students. 

The inclusive school environment fosters positive student and community engagement. Interactions between individuals, peers, staff and the community are affirming and supportive. Cultural diversity is acknowledged and celebrated. Students have a strong sense of belonging at school. Student leadership is empowered and highly valued for their contribution to the positive school culture. Transition into, through and out of school is well managed and individualised for learners and those identified with complex needs. 

Professional capability and practice ensures a cohesive and comprehensive response to achieve equity and excellence for learners. Professional learning and development (PLD) is well aligned to the school priorities. Staff use their collective knowledge and well-considered strategies to foster positive learner outcomes. Classroom practice supports high levels of student engagement in learning. Teachers use a variety of effective strategies to meet the needs of individual learners. Leadership is highly reflective and collaborative. Trustees suitably represent and reflect their community.

Engagement in review, inquiry and evaluation purposefully supports curriculum innovation, enhances teaching and learning and ensures effective governance. Comprehensive analysis of achievement, practice and school operation is strategically undertaken to determine successes and ongoing developments. Trustees scrutinise reported information to inform decision making to determine relevant priorities. Community consultation with parents and whānau is appropriately used to guide and review school direction. Policy, curriculum and strategic review by trustees is well planned and timely.  

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Leaders and teachers are seeking to further enhance teaching, learning and achievement in writing, especially for boys. Involvement in externally sourced PLD has begun, and will continue in 2019. ERO’s evaluation affirms this priority. Extending the knowledge of staff to deliver innovative approaches and strategies to their teaching practice should further strengthen student engagement and achievement.    

The school demonstrates a planned and deliberate approach to promoting the dispositional learning of students. Further developments and review of systems and practices are planned or currently being undertaken. ERO’s evaluation affirms that ongoing inquiry should enable staff to evaluate and determine the impact of deliberate curriculum changes in relation to student outcomes.     

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management. 

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • comprehensive systems, processes and practices that ensure an effective response to targeted learners and students with additional and complex needs
  • curriculum provision that promotes the emerging and developing capabilities of learners
  • effective professional capability and practice that contributes to positive learning and organisational management
  • inclusive environments that foster the wellbeing and engagement of students, parents and whānau
  • internal review and inquiry that meaningfully contributes to ongoing school improvement.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • further enhancing teaching, learning and achievement in writing, especially for boys
  • continuing the development of inquiry and evaluation in relation to approaches fostering students’ dispositional learning.

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in four-to-five years.

Phil Cowie
Director Review and Improvement Services
Central Region

20 February 2019

About the school 

Location

Whanganui

Ministry of Education profile number

2403

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

172

Gender composition

Male 50%, Female 50%

Ethnic composition

Māori                             30%
Pākehā                           62%
Other ethnic groups      8%

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

Yes

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

December 2018

Date of this report

20 February 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review             February 2016
Education Review             November 2012
Education Review             July 2009

Findings

Mosston School is a well-resourced, family focused community school. Students achieve very well, including Māori learners. Students needing extra support are carefully tracked for accelerated progress. Student-centred professional leadership and governance leads to ongoing growth in teaching and learning, including culturally responsive and e-learning teaching.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Mosston School caters for students in Years 1 to 6 on the western outskirts of Whanganui. The current roll of 162 students includes 45 Māori students.

Since the November 2012 ERO report, an expanded school leadership provides ongoing continuity.

Strong family and community support, along with positive relationships, remain key features of the school. Students experience a broad based curriculum centred on the CARES values and key competencies of ‘confident, active, respectful, enthusiastic and successful’ learners. A wellresourced environment and focus on the whole child supports children's physical activity, wellbeing and access to a broad curriculum.

Very good progress is evident in developing and embedding the positive features of the school.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Student achievement information is used effectively by school leaders, trustees and teachers to make positive changes to learners’ achievement. Each student is well known and sound tracking and monitoring enables early identification of needs. Individual learning and interests are carefully considered in classroom and targeted intervention programmes. Teacher aides support teachers and further contribute to the impact of these strategies.

The school reports that the majority of students achieve at or above in relation to the National Standards in literacy and mathematics. Overall achievement in reading and writing has increased between 2013 and 2014. School systems support Māori learners’ progress to exceed their peers in writing and increasingly similar levels of success in reading and mathematics. School leaders and trustees develop a number of improvement targets based on the needs of groups of students. Raising the achievement of a small group of boys in writing remains an ongoing focus. English as a second language learning is well supported.

School review processes result in robust National Standards student achievement information. Teaching as inquiry is well used by teachers to accelerate student learning and to build teacher capability. They are trialling the Progress and Consistency Tool (PaCT) to support ongoing developments in assessment to improve learning.

Students are taking a greater leadership role in managing their individual and collective learning. Regular goal setting at parent conferences and during literacy and mathematics programmes has encouraged learners to self-assess and identify their next steps. Teachers continue to develop innovative approaches to enable students to have increased knowledge, self-management and ownership of their learning. Increasing student agency continues to be an appropriate area of ongoing focus.

Trustees receive clear and regular reports about the progress of targeted learners and the impact of interventions provided for students. The leadership team closely monitors each student's progress and uses appropriate external expertise, such as the Resource Teacher Learning and Behaviour (RTLB) to support students and teachers. The board is well informed about the impact of their resourcing decisions on improving learning. Each learner is tracked for success.

Parents receive clear reports about their child’s progress in relation to the National Standards and other learning areas. Partnerships for learning are extended by regular opportunities for parents to contribute to and share in their child’s learning at school and at home.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Students participate in a well-rounded curriculum, with a clear focus on literacy, mathematics, physical activity and wellbeing. They are highly engaged in purposeful learning and value the wide range of opportunities. Students increasingly self manage and are encouraged to make choices in what and how they learn. They are motivated, focused and enjoy school.

Modern learning practices such as e-learning are developing well, with students increasing their use of digital technologies. There is a strategic approach to ensuring that the strengths of the school curriculum are further enhanced through modern practices that are matched to how students learn.

Teachers have increased the effectiveness of their practices in meeting individual learning needs and interests through participation in a wide range of intervention programmes. They are involved in Accelerated Literacy Learning (ALL), Reading Together and the Massey University Early Literacy Project (ELP). This involvement provides teachers with valuable access to current research and best practices. These programmes and others, involve parents as valued partners in learning.

Culturally responsive curriculum opportunities are visible in the curriculum. External expertise provides ongoing and sequential support to increase students' and teachers' use of te reo Māori, bicultural experiences and access to culturally significant local history and places.

Transition to school for pre-school children is well supported through the Little Learner’s programme facilitated by the principal. This is further supported by other learning opportunities that build on their early childhood learning experiences. A deliberate approach to ensuring Years 1 and 2 students have the best possible start to their education is in place.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Māori learners’ progress and achievement has continued to increase over time. More students are achieving at and above in relation to the National Standards. Those requiring support are promptly identified and whānau support is accessed.

Students engage in a comprehensive range of regular, culturally responsive learning opportunities. An external tutor, with affiliations to local iwi, supports students and teachers to increasingly use te reo Māori and appreciate the importance of karakia, waiata, kapa haka, pōwhiri and noho marae. These practices continue to develop well and extend Māori learners’ celebration of their language, culture and identity.

A whānau group meets regularly and offers valuable advice and guidance to trustees. A Māori board representative provides a link to strategic decision making. Planning is underway to consider the future direction of the roopū, including how to further increase whānau contribution to governance.

Internal evaluation will continue to explore the positive impact of the culturally responsive curriculum on students’ learning. This should assist school leaders, teachers, trustees and whānau Māori to further celebrate these achievements and to continue to implement additional strategies that promote success for Māori students as Māori.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance. Robust school processes for tracking and monitoring students’ learning are embedded.

Trustees are clearly focused on ensuring all students achieve well. A range of well-considered targets is set to support student progress and school developments. Relevant Hautū governance professional development attended by the Māori board representative is informing how the board will continue to consult and respond to the community. Continuity in governance through succession planning is in place.

Strong professional, collaborative leadership is centred on providing timely and effective learning experiences. School leader's complementary skills build teaching capabilities and provide good support to new teachers. There is a shared commitment to being an active member of a local cluster of schools to share and further extend effective teaching and learning practices.

Thorough appraisal practices actively encourage growth and development in teaching practices. Teachers set individual goals, using a wide range of suitable evidence that includes observational feedback, critical reflection and student voice. They access a wide range of professional learning opportunities.

Self review informs ongoing developments in teaching and learning. Regular curriculum reviews reflect ongoing growth in teachers’ knowledge and practices. There are high expectations that new knowledge leads to higher expectations for effective teaching practices. Further developing the use of internal evaluation practices is a next step. There are regular, ongoing opportunities for families to be part of children’s learning. An open door policy encourages regular classrooms visits and discussions about progress. Partnerships for learning are a key component of all school initiatives.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Mosston School is a well-resourced, family focused community school. Students achieve very well, including Māori learners. Students needing extra support are carefully tracked for accelerated progress. Student-centred professional leadership and governance leads to ongoing growth in teaching and learning, including culturally responsive and e-learning teaching.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

11 February 2016

School Statistics

Location

Whanganui

Ministry of Education profile number

2403

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

162

Gender composition

Male 57%, Female 43%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Other ethnic groups

27%

66%

7%

Review team on site

November 2015

Date of this report

11 February 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

November 2012

July 2009

October 2006