Lytton Street School

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School Context

Lytton Street School in Feilding has students in Years 1 to 6. The roll of 546 students includes 32% who identify as Māori and 3% Pacific. Since the December 2014 ERO report, the roll has increased by six classes.

The values of ‘Respect, Akohia, Hautoa, Ambition and Ownership’ are integrated throughout the school and displayed in each classroom.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • reading, writing and mathematics in relation to national and school expectations

  • behaviour and wellbeing

  • learning, presence, participation and respect for cultural identities.

Over the past three years the curriculum has been redeveloped to incorporate an increased focus on relationships, culture, engagement and fostering independent learning. Professional learning and development has focused on teaching philosophy and curriculum development. The board employs facilitators for literacy and mathematics.

The school is part of, and the principal leads, the Feilding Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

Since the previous ERO review, the school has worked concertedly to improve equity and excellence. Student achievement data from 2015 and 2016 shows an upward trend in reading, writing and mathematics. Leaders and teachers are aware that achievement in writing and mathematics needs to further improve.

Reading data for 2016 shows that the school is achieving equitable outcomes for most Pākehā and Māori students. Almost all Pacific students achieve well in reading. In writing, there is significant disparity of achievement for boys when compared to girls. In mathematics most students are achieving, with the achievement of Māori and Pacific children slightly below their peers.

Schoolwide data shows increased progress and improved outcomes over time.

1.2 How effectively does this school respond to those Māori and other students whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is responsive to the needs of Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

Pacific students’ learning needs are well known by leaders and teachers. Overall they are progressing well.There is evidence that many Māori students who require additional support make accelerated progress over time.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

School leadership is highly cohesive, collaborative and effective, resulting in orderly and supportive environment conducive to student learning and wellbeing. Leaders deliberately focus on building teacher capacity so that all staff understand and consistently implement the school’s philosophy of teaching. Transitions for children into and through the school are seamless. Classes are carefully constructed and thoughtfully resourced. Board funding and allocation of resources is clearly aligned to the school’s vision, values, goals and targets. Leadership and trustees are strategic in the appointment of new teachers.

School leaders consistently track and monitor the achievement of all students. Systems for tracking and monitoring children’s progress, especially those in need of extra support are well established. How well Māori students achieve is closely monitored .Each teacher sets targets for students who receive individualised support to increase their rates of progress.at class and school wide levels and tracked termly in reading, writing and mathematics

High levels of inclusiveness are evident for children with identified special needs. They are well integrated into school activities and are engaged in appropriately individualised learning programmes.

The learning environment is managed effectively to promote participation, engagement and student agency in learning. This is seen thorough positive attitudes, increased engagement in and ownership of learning, enhanced student wellbeing and positive behaviour. Surveys of students and staff undertaken each year show very positive shifts in learning, presence, participation and respect for cultural identities. Extensive review and redevelopment of the school’s curriculum and philosophy of teaching is having a substantial impact on improving student outcomes.

Internal evaluation contributes effectively to school improvement. Leaders regularly implement surveys and reviews. Whānau and the community are regularly consulted. Staff and student voice is collected and used to determine future actions. Systems, processes and practices are subject to ongoing scrutiny and evaluation to promote positive outcomes for students.

The board effectively meets its statutory responsibilities. Their stewardship of the school promotes high quality education outcomes and safety. Board resourcing of digital technology enables equitable access for students and supports the school direction for students’ increased progress and achievement.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence?

The school has identified its next steps are to: enhance the school’s curriculum; build teacher practice to use intentional teaching strategies; and increase student ownership of learning.

This ongoing development of the curriculum and teaching provides opportunity for further development of internal evaluation practice. A priority is to inquire more deeply into factors impeding higher achievement in writing and mathematics and for boys and how teaching practice can successfully address this to make a greater difference. How well external facilitation leads to shifts in practice for improved achievement in writing and mathematics should be part of this development.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • purposeful leadership and governance that sets clear direction for children’s learning and promoting equity and excellence

  • systematic data management, analysis and interpretation that identifies areas of student need and informs good decision making for teaching and learning

  • internal evaluation of student achievement, wellbeing, school systems and processes that identifies areas of strength and areas for increased attention to support positive outcomes

  • the culture of collaboration of leaders and staff that establishes shared understandings and cohesive approaches, with high expectations for curriculum implementation.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, development priorities are in:

  • continued use of existing information about acceleration of progress to build explicit knowledge of effective practices that promote equity for all students

  • continued monitoring of the impact of curriculum developments to identify areas for further work that support improved outcomes for students.

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in four-to-five years.

Patricia Davey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

12 December 2017

About the school

Location

Feilding

Ministry of Education profile number

2389

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

546

Gender composition

Boys 55%, Girls 45%

Ethnic composition

Māori 32%
Pākehā 62%
Pacific 3%
Other ethnic groups 3%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

October 2017

Date of this report

12 December 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review December 2014
Education Review April 2011
Education Review April 2008

Findings

Student engagement, progress and success are promoted through the well-designed curriculum and a comprehensive range of learning experiences. Māori language, culture and identity are valued and visible in the school. A strong home and school partnership supports students to be successful learners. School leaders and trustees provide effective leadership and governance for learning.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Lytton Street School in Feilding caters for students from Years 1 to 6. The roll of 454 students includes 37% who identify as Māori. The school acknowledges Ngāti Kauwhata as mana whenua.

The school has a positive ERO reporting history. The board and senior leaders responded positively to the April 2011 ERO report.

The school’s vision: together, we live to learn and learn to live – kia ora kia tahi, kia tahi kia ora and AROHA values: Akohia, Respect, Ownership, Hautoa, Ambition underpin the curriculum, teaching practice and learning programmes.

The school is going through a time of significant change. Since the previous ERO report, a number of staff, leadership and board changes have occurred, including the appointment of a new principal at the start of term two, 2014.

Established relationships with the wider community provide students with an extensive range of academic, sporting and cultural activities that cater for individual interests and abilities. Expansive, well maintained grounds promote physical wellbeing and encourage exploration and challenge for all students.

The board, leaders and teachers have a strong focus on supporting student learning, achievement and wellbeing. They promote an inclusive and welcoming school environment where diversity is embraced and celebrated. Staff, students, parents and whānau have a strong sense of community and belonging.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

School leaders and trustees use achievement information very well to promote student engagement, progress and achievement.

Goals and actions in the school’s annual plan are focused on promoting student engagement, learning, progress and achievement. Most students are achieving at or above the National Standards expectations in reading, writing and mathematics. The school identified boys and Māori students as groups requiring improvement in writing and mathematics. School leaders have considered ways of enhancing learning outcomes for these students and set appropriate targets in the school’s charter to accelerate and raise levels of achievement.

School leaders analyse student achievement information comprehensively. The board receives regular in-depth reports from the principal and has a good understanding of trends and patterns in student achievement. Trustees question data and use it to inform their decision-making.

Teachers use a range of information to make overall judgements about student achievement in relation to National Standards. They also make good use of this information to group students for instruction, identify those requiring additional support, and to monitor their progress. School leaders continue to develop teachers’ deliberate use of achievement information to determine the impact of their practice on student learning and progress.

A variety of interventions and programmes are in place that effectively promotes learning for students achieving below expectation, and those with diverse learning needs. The school has a coordinated approach to the use of school and external support resources, personnel and services. Collated data enables the impact of interventions on student well being and learning to be evaluated.

Parents receive useful information during the year about their children’s progress and achievement in relation to National Standards, the AROHA values and other key learning areas. Recent review of reporting to parents has led to a greater emphasis on students sharing learning with their parents and whānau.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum effectively promotes and supports student learning. It is closely linked to The New Zealand Curriculum and has been tailored to cater for the needs of students at Lytton Street School. The curriculum puts students at the centre of learning, is forward looking and affirms New Zealand’s unique identity. Clearly defined expectations guide teaching to promote learning for all students.

AROHA values are deliberately taught and are well understood by teachers and students. These values, informed through consultation with students, teachers and parents support consistency of practice across all learning in the school. The impact and effectiveness of implemented changes have been evaluated and next steps identified.

School leaders have a clear understanding about the quality of teaching practice across the school and work to develop consistent practice. Students are well settled in their classes and environments support and reflect student learning. Te reo Māori and Māori contexts are evident in the environment and programmes. Bicultural knowledge and skills are being developed across the school. School leaders continue to increase opportunities for students to learn te reo me ngā tikanga Māori.

Teachers use a range of strategies to effectively engage students in learning. They have high expectations of students and believe in them as capable, competent learners. Students are actively engaged, self managing learners. A wide range of programmes and initiatives support their wellbeing and positive engagement in school and learning. Students access information technology tools to support their learning. School leaders continue to strengthen the provision and use of information and communication technologies to enhance teaching and learning.

School leaders and teachers continue to develop strategies to support success for Pacific students. They are committed to building strong relationships with families of these students. The collaboratively developed education plan informs the direction for promoting learning for Pacific students.

Effective processes and partnerships support successful transition of students and their families to school. Teachers respect and value prior learning that students bring to school. Transition to intermediate is well considered and responsive to the needs of students and their families. Specialist personnel support students with diverse needs.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

School leaders, trustees and teachers value relationships with parents and whānau of Māori students. High expectations are expressed by the school for achievement and for Māori students to achieve success as Māori.

The school respects the contributions of whānau and iwi in considering curriculum development, focuses and programmes. Culture, identity and language that students bring to school are acknowledged and valued. Māori students have key leadership roles in cultural activities such as pōwhiri and kapa haka.

The school is building the extent to which they respond to the aspirations of whānau and iwi. Reciprocal partnerships continue to be developed. A collaboratively developed education plan informs the direction for Māori success as Māori over the next three years. Whānau hui are facilitated by Māori parent leaders and school leaders.

School leaders continue to support teachers to develop awareness and understanding of strategies that best promote learning and positive outcomes for Māori.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to improve outcomes for students.

Self-review processes are used effectively by school leaders and trustees to inform strategic direction and resourcing. Changes implemented from review are well considered and effectively managed. School leaders and trustees are focused on improving teacher practice to promote student learning. A next step is to continue to strengthen the use of self-review practices to evaluate the school curriculum to further enhance student learning, progress and achievement.

The charter clearly articulates the school’s vision and values. The well aligned charter, strategic and annual plans provide clear, explicit direction for school operation, teaching and learning.

The board is actively involved in decision-making about the school’s strategic direction. Trustees’ responsibilities are clearly outlined and they are increasingly focused on using achievement information to inform decision making.

The principal provides strong professional leadership and is well supported by the experienced deputy principal to effectively guide improvement. There is a clear focus on building capability of leaders, teachers and students. Senior and middle management leaders access professional development to grow their leadership skills.

Leaders are building a culture of reflection across the school, focused on learning. An effective process for supporting teacher inquiry focuses on student needs and the consideration of the impact of teaching on learning outcomes. Teachers share practice and work collaboratively.

The appraisal process is improvement-focused and includes alignment to The Registered Teacher Criteria, Tātaiako: Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners, school-developed indicators and teacher inquiry. Appraisal is used to identify and support ongoing improvement of the quality of teaching. Teachers are well supported through professional development aligned to school-wide focuses, goals and priorities.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Student engagement, progress and success are promoted through the well-designed curriculum and a comprehensive range of learning experiences. Māori language, culture and identity are valued and visible in the school. A strong home and school partnership supports students to be successful learners. School leaders and trustees provide effective leadership and governance for learning.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services Central Region

16 December 2014

About the School

Location

Feilding

Ministry of Education profile number

2389

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

454

Gender composition

Male 52%, Female 48%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Pacific

Other ethnic groups

37%

58%

3%

2%

Review team on site

November 2014

Date of this report

16 December 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

April 2011

April 2008

November 2004