Linton Camp School

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School Context

Linton Camp School is situated in Linton, Manawatū. It has students in Years 1 to 8. The roll of 143 students, includes 58% who identify as Māori.

The vision seeks to promote the 21st century learner that is ‘Owning our Learning, Owning our Future, Whakamau akoranga, whakamau a mau’.

The achievement target for 2019 is focused on students whose achievement was below expectation at the end of 2018, to progress to the point where they meet or exceed expectation for their curriculum level.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • achievement and progress in reading, writing and mathematics.

The school has a strong relationship and is supported by the New Zealand Defence Force. The nature of family postings has significant influence on fluctuating roll numbers. Play-based learning has been introduced in the new entrant class over the past two years.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school continues to develop consistent systems and processes that promote effective practice to address equity of outcomes for all students.

School data from 2018 shows that most Māori students and the majority of Pākehā students achieved at, or above, expectation for reading, writing and mathematics. Over time, girls’ achievement levels are higher than boys in reading and writing and slightly lower in mathematics.

Most Year 8 students in 2018 left, achieving expectations in writing and mathematics and all in reading.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school effectively identifies a group of students whose learning needs acceleration and supports these learners through in class and external interventions. In 2018, information shows that of the students identified, some achieved at expected levels by the end of 2018. Those whose learning continues to require acceleration are in the target group for 2019.

Data over time shows teachers use a range of practices and processes to successfully accelerate progress for some of the identified students.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Positive relationships across the school community support and promote students’ wellbeing and an environment that is conducive to learning. Leaders and teachers know students well. Parents, whānau and community are welcome and encouraged to be involved in school activities as respected and valued partners in their children’s learning.

Teachers use an appropriate range of tools to identify and respond to the individual learning needs of students. They use data to monitor, track and report progress over time. Moderation processes support consistency of teacher judgments about progress and achievement. The principal analyses information to identify and report achievement for schoolwide, year level, gender and ethnicity cohorts.

The curriculum is responsive to the language, culture and identity of Māori students. The strategic statement for Māori supports the provision of programmes and opportunities for all students to deepen their understandings of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori. Teachers’ review of practice contributes to ongoing improvement in levels of achievement for Māori students.

Practices for building teacher and leader capabilities align well to the school’s vision and goals. Teachers’ collaboration and inquiry leads to adaptive classroom practice focused on accelerating the progress of students requiring further intervention.

Trustees are well informed about student achievement and curriculum emphases. They use this information to inform their decision making. The board is very supportive of student and staff wellbeing. Provision of schoolwide professional learning and development is well aligned to school goals and priorities.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

To support improved internal evaluation and achieve equity for all, consideration should be given:

  • refining annual achievement targets to ensure trustees receive timely information about Māori learners and those at risk of underachieving
  • developing curriculum statements aligned the school’s vision.

Leaders and teachers recognise the need to inquire further into the effectiveness of practices and processes to better promote acceleration of those identified as at risk of underachieving.

3 Board Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Children’s Act 2014.

4 ERO’s Overall Judgement

On the basis of the findings of this review, ERO’s overall evaluation judgement of Linton Camp School’s performance in achieving valued outcomes for its students is: Well placed.

ERO’s Framework: Overall School Performance is available on ERO’s website.

5 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • a culture of collaborative capability building that maintains high expectations for teaching and learning
  • inclusive practices that promote students’ wellbeing and supports their learning progress, and success.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • planning to accelerate learning for those who need this
  • strengthening the use of internal evaluation processes and practices to determine what is working well for students’ learning and where improvements are needed.

Phillip Cowie

Director Review and Improvement Services Central

Central Region

2 October 2019

About the school

Location

Linton

Ministry of Education profile number

2386

School type

Full Primary

School roll

143

Gender composition

Male 62%, Female 38%

Ethnic composition

Māori 58%
NZ European/Pākehā 31%
Other ethnic groups 11%

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

Yes

Review team on site

August 2019

Date of this report

2 October 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review October 2016
Education Review November 2013
Education Review October 2010

1 Context

Linton Camp School is a full primary school for students in Years 1 to 8 and is located in the Linton Army Camp village, 10 kilometres outside of Palmerston North. At the time of this ERO review there were 128 students on the roll and 85 identified as Māori. Most students are children of Defence Force personnel living in the village. The school experiences roll, board and staff turnover due to the nature of military postings.

A kindergarten, childcare centre and kohanga reo operate in close proximity. There are close links between these early childhood education providers, a community services team, camp personnel and the school.

2 Equity and excellence

The vision and valued outcomes defined by the school for all children are ‘Owning our Learning - Owning our Future’ - ‘Whakamau akoranga - Whakamau ā mua’.

The school’s achievement information shows that in 2015 most students were achieving at and above in relation to the National Standards. Māori students achieved at levels similar to their Pākehā peers in reading, and better in writing and mathematics. Boys were over represented in students performing below the Standards.

Since the last ERO evaluation the school has:

  • participated in Accelerated Learning in Literacy (ALL) with a focus on writing
  • aligned school evaluation processes to improve the teaching of writing
  • undertaken professional development in assessment practice to better inform teaching and learning
  • begun to implement a revised curriculum delivery plan and a careers education and guidance programme for Years 7 and 8 students
  • incorporated Ka Hikitia - Accelerating Success- 2013-2017 andTātaiako: Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners into teacher appraisal goals
  • developed a plan to raise Māori student achievement
  • begun to identify and apply culturally responsive teaching strategies
  • used internal expertise to build staff capability in te reo me ngā tikanga Māori.

Leaders identify that these need ongoing development.

3 Accelerating achievement

How effectively does this school respond to Māori children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

Most Māori students achieve at or above expected levels in reading, writing and maths. The school appropriately identifies Māori students whose learning needs acceleration to meet the Standards.

A planned approach is documented. This includes embedding practice that makes a difference for Māori learners. The importance of knowing the learner, having high expectations and maintaining strong relationships with the students and whānau is integral to this work for increasing engagement.

Data is used effectively to identify, track and monitor student progress. Teachers are examining the effectiveness of their responses to students' needs.

The document Tātaiako: Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners is used to inform the teacher appraisal process. It is supporting teachers to know about and develop culturally responsive practice.

How effectively does this school respond to other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

Leaders support teachers to plan and teach well planned and organised lessons to meet the specific needs of their students. In 2016 an 'at-risk' intervention programme has been implemented to address the needs of students who require additional support to make accelerated progress. Their learning is monitored and reported. Where further concerns are indicated, students are referred to external agencies for assessment and an individual education plan is developed.

4 School conditions

How effectively do the school’s curriculum and other organisational processes and practices develop and enact the school’s vision, values, goals and targets for equity and excellence?

School conditions are positive for enacting the vision, values, goals and targets to promote equity and excellence.

Trustees bring a range of expertise, perspectives and experience. Clear and well-considered processes and proactive responses to succession and induction are evident. A sound framework has been developed to support those new to the role of governance. The board is beginning to engage with Hautū – Māori cultural responsiveness self review tool for boards of trustees to plan for culturally responsive direction.

The principal provides the board with regular, comprehensive and useful information. To assist the board in making resourcing decisions, these reports should include information about the effectiveness of interventions aimed at raising achievement.

Leaders are improvement-focused and work collaboratively with staff to build shared understandings of effective practice and what counts as evidence. Management systems are aligned with the annual goals and targets and serve to build capability. The principal promotes a culture of inquiry amongst teachers. He has identified this is an aspect of evaluation that needs further development.

Significant work has gone into the review of Linton Camp School curriculum. It is a coherent, living document for guiding teacher practice and reflects learnings gained from recent professional development.

Teachers have high expectations for learning and behaviour. They take care to design study contexts and tasks that motivate students to engage and learn. Students experience a broad, interesting curriculum. More development of the guidelines for integration of curriculum areas, e-learning and incorporation of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori, is needed to increase consistency of implementation. Teachers and leaders access family and whānau cultural knowledge and expertise to enhance student learning opportunities. Continuing to embed a Māori world view into learning contexts is likely to enhance Māori student engagement.

Teaching practice is effective for students knowing about their learning. Teachers and students construct goals together and agree the criteria required to achieve the desired outcome. These conversations help students to consider how well they are going and what they need to do to improve. Teachers should make the success criteria easy for all learners to access and understand so their self-management can be facilitated. Involvement of parents and whānau in goal setting is likely to enrich the process for students and families.

Parents, whanau and community are welcomed in the school as respected and valued partners in learning. Whānau and wider community feedback is sought to inform decision-making. Strong links across the community help to support smooth transitions from early childhood services and foster belonging and wellbeing.

5 Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated
  • respond effectively to the strengths, needs and interests of each child
  • regularly evaluate how well teaching is working for these children
  • act on what they know works well for each child
  • build teacher capability effectively to achieve equitable outcomes for all children
  • are well placed to achieve and sustain equitable and excellent outcomes for all children.

Leaders should continue to build the collective capacity of staff to evaluate and inquire for sustained improvement.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and Self Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management. 

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions

  • attendance

  • compliance with the provisions of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014

6 Recommendation

ERO recommends that school leaders continue their focus on raising student achievement by further developing and implementing:

  • a culturally responsive curriculum and teacher practice
  • continuing to build internal evaluation capacity to know what is working, who for and why.

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

19 October 2016 

About the school

Location

Palmerston North

Ministry of Education profile number

2386

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

128

Gender composition

Female 55%, Male 45%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Pacific

Other ethnic groups

65%

27%

2%

6%

Review team on site

August 2016

Date of this report

19 October 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

November 2013

October 2010

March 2008