Kai Iwi School

Education institution number:
2369
School type:
Full Primary
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
111
Telephone:
Address:

908 State Highway 3, Kai Iwi, Whanganui

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Kai Iwi School

Te Ara Huarau | School Profile Report

Background

This Profile Report was written within 14 months of the Education Review Office and Kai Iwi School working in Te Ara Huarau, an improvement evaluation approach used in most English Medium State and State Integrated Schools. For more information about Te Ara Huarau see ERO’s website. www.ero.govt.nz

Context 

Kai iwi School is a full primary school located approximatley 10 kilometres from Whanganui. The school caters for students in years 1 to 8.

Kai Iwi School’s strategic priorities for improving outcomes for learners are:

  • to provide curriculum learning experiences for students that achieve continuous academic improvement for all learners

  • to ensure a safe physical and emotional environment that promotes positive relationships and hauora for all learners

  • to foster educationally powerful connections and relationships that recognise  Te Tiriti o Waitangi partnership.

You can find a copy of the school’s strategic and annual plan on Kai Iwi School’s website.

ERO and the school are working together to evaluate how well delivery of the school’s literacy curriculum achieves equitable and excellent outcomes for all learners.

The rationale for selecting this evaluation is:

  • In 2021, school leaders and ERO worked together to design an evaluation plan focused on understanding the impact of the schools’ deliberate actions on accelerating the progress of a group of boys in writing. School leaders developed specific plans in 2021 to address this disparity. Teachers participated in literacy professional learning and development (PLD). They worked collaboratively to inquire into the impact of teaching strategies on learners. At the end of 2021, reported information shows a positive trajectory in achievement for learners. Leaders and teachers are continuing their focus on delivery of the literacy curriculum to further develop shared strategies and practice that achieves equitable and excellent outcomes for students.

The school expects to see:

  • equity and excellence for students and accelerated progress for learners working toward curriculum expectations in literacy

  • effective teaching and learning, reflecting shared strategies and new approaches, in the delivery of literacy

  • teacher inquiry that identifies the impact of strategies on learner outcomes and how barriers have been considered and addressed to accelerate the progress of students working toward curriculum expectations

  • the schools’ localised curriculum is documented overtime to reflect shared expectations for teaching, learning and culturally responsive practice in delivery of the literacy curriculum.

Strengths

The school can draw from the following strengths to support it in its goal to achieve equitable and excellent outcomes for all learners in literacy:

  • classroom environments are positive and productive, encouraging the purposeful engagement of students in learning

  • appropriate literacy assessment processes ensure the progress of all learners is tracked and monitored overtime to respond to their learning needs and report outcomes to the board of trustees, parents and whānau

  • leaders’ decision making aligns appropriate resourcing to support the introduction of new approaches in the delivery of the literacy curriculum

  • collaborative practice between staff provides regular opportunities to inquire into their literacy practice, share teaching strategies and incorporate new learning to support learner engagement, progress and achievement.

Where to next?

Moving forward, the school will prioritise:

  • continued opportunities for teachers to share practice and participate in literacy PLD to build their collective understanding and implementation of effective literacy practice 

  • ongoing documenting of changes to the Kai Iwi School literacy curriculum as new approaches are embedded into practice

  • gathering information, at points in time, using progress data, observation of practice and stakeholder voice to inform evaluation insights into the impact of changes to literacy practice on outcomes for learners.  

ERO’s role will be to support the school in its evaluation for improvement cycle to improve outcomes for all learners. ERO will support the school in reporting their progress to the community. The next public report on ERO’s website will be a Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report and is due within three years.

Phil Cowie
Director Review and Improvement Services (Central)
Central Region | Te Tai Pūtahi Nui

2 February 2023 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement.  educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Kai Iwi School

Board Assurance with Regulatory and Legislative Requirements Report 2022 to 2025

As of September 2022, Kai Iwi School, School Board has attested to the following regulatory and legislative requirements:

Board Administration

Yes

Curriculum

Yes

Management of Health, Safety and Welfare

Yes

Personnel Management

Yes

Finance

Yes

Assets

Yes

Further Information

For further information please contact Kai Iwi School, School Board.

The next School Board assurance that it is meeting regulatory and legislative requirements will be reported, along with the Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report, within three years.

Information on ERO’s role and process in this review can be found on the Education Review Office website.

Phil Cowie
Director Review and Improvement Services (Central)
Central Region | Te Tai Pūtahi Nui

2 February 2023 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Kai Iwi School - 07/02/2017

1 Context

Kai Iwi School is a full primary school located approximately 10 kilometres northwest of Whanganui in a small rural community. Staff changes since the April 2014 ERO review, include a relieving principal for a period of time. A permanent principal was appointed mid 2015. The school roll is 99, with twenty six students who identify as Māori.

2 Equity and excellence

The vision and valued outcomes defined by the school for all children are that, they contribute as a community of caring, enthusiastic discoverers and creators for today and tomorrow, to be the best they can be 'to develop as creative, critical, reflective thinkers and learners who are engaged in their learning'.

The values of resilience, respect and responsibility are actively promoted, taught, explored and modelled throughout the school. These underpin the school expectations and behaviour, underpinned by restorative practices.

School reported achievement information at the end of 2015 showed most students, including Māori, achieved National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Writing achievement is slightly better than that in the other two areas.

When compared to other groups, Māori learners’ achievement is slightly higher in mathematics and reading. Girls achieve at similar levels to boys in reading and mathematics. The gender disparity in writing is more significant for boys. The school recognises this challenge and continues to work to address this disparity.

Further work is necessary to improve the consistency and dependability of teachers' judgements about student achievement in relation to the National Standards. Teachers base these on observations of students' learning, and leaders and teachers analysis of assessment information, including standardised testing. Teacher judgements for writing are discussed within teaching teams and across the school as part of a moderation process.

Leaders agree it is timely to further develop assessment and moderation procedures to ensure all teachers have a shared understanding of and comprehensive expectations for this process. Developing clear guidelines should help:

  • define accelerated progress
  • articulate the expectations for the moderation process including use of assessment tools and their importance to making assessment judgements
  • clarify the place of stanine and curriculum levelling in teachers' decision making. 

Since the April 2013 ERO evaluation the school has worked collaboratively to:

  • further develop the curriculum to embrace and reflect Māori learners' culture, language and identities
  • include targeted children within teaching as inquiry and appraisal processes
  • research and discuss best practice as colleagues and with other professionals, and source and implement intervention programmes for identified learners
  • undertake professional learning
  • focus on effective teaching and learning strategies
  • increase the use of digital technologies as an integral part of the school's curriculum.

3 Accelerating achievement

How effectively does this school respond to Māori children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school has a range of effective strategies in place to respond to Māori students for whom the school needs to raise achievement. Leaders and teachers know who these students are.

At the end of 2015, most Māori students achieved at or above the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. The few experiencing achievement challenges made steady progress as they moved through the school. Teachers continue to consolidate practices that promote students' wellbeing, diminish achievement challenges and progress learning.

Strategic planning and ongoing curriculum development include a number of initiatives that embrace Māori learners' culture, language and identities. Whānau aspirations are sought and responded to, an example being the reintroduction of kapa haka. Te reo Māori and te ao Māori are an integral part of students' learning experience.

Some trustees have undertaken training with the New Zealand School Trustees Association to use: Hautū: the Māori Cultural Responsiveness Self Review Tool for Boards of Trustees. They intend to incorporate this approach to their ongoing work to build their understanding and capacity to set clear directions for Māori educational success in the school.

How effectively does this school respond to other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

Students whose learning and achievement needs acceleration are known by teaching staff. The school's response to analysed achievement information includes adapting teaching practice and providing additional support staffing. This occurs at the classroom level and through intervention programmes.

It is timely to review the inclusive practices that bring school, specialist staff, parents and whānau together to find solutions to address the unique needs identified for individual learners. Adapting school practice to focus more closely on all students whose learning progress needs monitoring or accelerating should strengthen the good practice already taking place.

Improved use of analysed achievement data to determine how effectively teaching, interventions and innovations improve student outcomes, should strengthen the school's internal evaluation and ongoing developments.

4 School conditions

How effectively do the school’s curriculum and other organisational processes and practices develop and enact the school’s vision, values, goals and targets for equity and excellence?

Learners at Kai Iwi School access a rich curriculum that effectively encourages their engagement, progress and achievement. There is clear alignment to The New Zealand Curriculum and the school's vision and values. The school is in the early stages of partnering with Ngā Rauru to begin implementing aspects of the Ngā Rauru curriculum. Ongoing review of the school's curriculum should provide it with a comprehensive and coherent guiding document. School leaders recognise the next steps for this development are to:

  • continue to cover all curriculum areas, including the provision of careers education for learners in Years 7 and 8
  • bring staff together collaboratively to familiarise themselves with, endorse and take ownership of the guidelines and expectations.

Trustees and school staff provide a learning environment conducive to all students' wellbeing. Parents, whānau and the wider communities involvement in the school is encouraged and valued. A positive tone and inclusive practice prevail.

Trustees recognise that the school’s strategic and annual planning practices require strengthening to prioritise developments and focus more on those learners experiencing achievement challenges. Planning for this is in the early stages. Intended changes to annual planning for 2017 should include actions that guide leaders and teachers to monitor and progress the learning of those students at risk of poor achievement outcomes.

Leaders and teachers are reflective practitioners. There is collaboration at all levels of the school. The school agrees that leadership and teaching as inquiry could be used better to evaluate the impact of effective teaching strategies, interventions and innovations for target learners.

It is timely to review the practice of appraising leaders and teachers. This should result in ensuring the procedures and practices used for the endorsement and renewal of Teacher Practising Certificates meet the requirements of the Education Council of Aotearoa New Zealand.

5 Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated
  • respond effectively to the strengths, needs and interests of each child
  • regularly evaluate how well teaching is working for these children
  • act on what they know works well for each child
  • build teacher capability effectively to achieve equitable outcomes for all children
  • are well placed to achieve and sustain equitable and excellent outcomes for all children. 

The school is in a good position to sharpen its focus on students whose achievement needs accelerating. ERO affirms the school's determination to reduce disparity through improved target setting and planning to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

6 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and Self Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions

  • attendance

  • compliance with the provisions of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014

Trustees and school leaders must ensure they:

  • provide appropriate career education and guidance for Years 7 and 8 students. [National Administration Guideline1 (f)]

7 Recommendation

ERO recommends that trustees, leaders and teachers continue to build internal evaluation capability to support a cohesive and evidence-based approach to sustaining equitable and excellent outcomes for students. 

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

7 February 2017 

About the school 

Location

Whanganui

Ministry of Education profile number

2369

School type

Full Primary (Year 1 to 8)

School roll

99

Gender composition

Males 52, Females 47

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Other ethnic groups

26

67

6

Review team on site

October 2016

Date of this report

7 February 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Supplementary Review

Education Review

April 2014

March 2011

November 2009

 

Kai Iwi School - 30/04/2014

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Kai Iwi School is a full primary school located approximately 10 kilometres northwest of Whanganui, in a small rural community. At the time of the review, there were 80 students on the roll. Approximately 30% are Māori.

The school benefits from a high level of parent and community support. Students enjoy regular experiences outside the classroom and across the wider district. They have many opportunities to develop skills and build on their learning in a spacious and well-maintained school environment.

The principal and a junior room teacher are new to the school since the March 2011 ERO report. There have been changes to the Board of Trustees. External training has supported trustees in their governance role. These training opportunities are ongoing.

The school values, collaboratively developed with its community, are represented as respect, resilience and responsibility. A positive school tone is evident.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Leaders and teachers effectively target specific groups of students and individuals to raise achievement. Teachers use a range of comprehensive planning and reporting processes that are focused on identifying and responding to students’ needs.

The school reports that most students achieve at or above, in relation to the National Standards, in reading, writing, and mathematics. Māori student achievement is lower than other learners in the school in writing and mathematics.

Student achievement information is well used by the principal, trustees and teachers to

  • identify trends and patterns and set appropriate targets for improvement
  • monitor student progress
  • report and record progress and achievement to parents.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum is effective in supporting good levels of achievement and progress. The current curriculum and assessment handbook adequately provides direction for the school.

The principal and leaders have identified, and ERO affirms, that this curriculum foundation should be used to ensure the planned review better reflects the school, its context and community. This includes:

  • reflecting the aspects of practice and strategies that are effectively raising achievement
  • a vision of success for Māori learners
  • making wider use of current research and good practice
  • developing indicators of success that would assist the ongoing review of curriculum effectiveness.

Students are confident, engaged, and motivated. Teachers use a wide range of very effective practices that focus and engage students well in their learning. They purposefully support students to practise skills independently and in groups. Students are well informed about what they are learning, their next steps, and how they can achieve these. Staff have a strong focus on promoting positive relationships with students.

Teachers and leaders are refining how they reflect on and review the effectiveness of teaching practice. ERO affirms this direction.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Building positive relationships with families and whānau has been a priority of leaders, teachers and the board. An ongoing priority is developing links with mana whenua, Ngaa Rauru.

Opportunities for Māori students to have leadership roles across the school are evident.

Teachers continue to promote opportunities for language, culture and identity to be valued and supported. Maintaining and strengthening relationships with iwi, are next steps.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance. The board’s targets and strategic planning are clearly linked to raising student achievement. Trustees support teachers’ involvement in professional development that aligns to school focuses.

Trustees proactively develop their understanding of roles and responsibilities and increasingly use evidence to decide priorities and target improvements.

The principal provides effective leadership and clear direction for the school. Significant work has occurred to develop school wide systems and processes to support school operations. Change processes are well considered and thoughtful. Leadership focuses on raising student achievement, promoting improvements to teaching and learning and developing effective partnerships with the community.

Planned developments to the appraisal process to include Tātaiako: Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners, align with the school’s priorities and future direction.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services Central Region (Acting)

30 April 2014Image removed.

About the School

Location

Whanganui

Ministry of Education profile number

2369

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

80

Gender composition

Girls 34, Boys 46

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

European

Asian

22

51

1

6

Review team on site

March 2014

Date of this report

30 April 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Supplementary Review

Education Review

Supplementary Review

March 2011

November 2009

May 2006