Lindisfarne College

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Education institution number:
230
School type:
Secondary (Year 7-15)
School gender:
Single Sex (Boys School)
Definition:
School with Boarding Facilities
Total roll:
484
Telephone:
Address:

600 Pakowhai Road, Stortford Lodge, Hastings

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1. Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Lindisfarne College is an integrated secondary school catering for boys from Years 7 to 13. Its special character and vision are expressed through the mission statement 'To provide a balanced education for boys in a Christian setting, emphasising excellence'. The four cornerstones (academic, cultural, sporting, spiritual) provide a framework for students to participate in a broad range of activities and experience success.

At the time of this review there were 496 boys on the roll, and 11% identify as Māori. Approximately half the boys live in the school hostel on site, with equal numbers of weekly and fulltime boarders. The diversity of student backgrounds has increased over time.

Ongoing investment in learning facilities by the college council has led to the addition of new sports fields and several new and refurbished classrooms. Further resourcing has seen the introduction of e-learning and an increase in digital technology in classrooms. More students are now bringing their own digital devices to support their learning at school.

Involvement with the International Boys’ Schools Coalition provides opportunities for professional development and to share best practice.

The college has appointed several new staff since the December 2011 ERO report. It has a good reporting history.

2. Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The college uses achievement information effectively to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement. Most students achieve at levels well above national expectations.

A comprehensive range of achievement information is collected when students transition into the college. Those who require accelerated progress in literacy and mathematics are identified for targeted support. By the end of Year 8 nearly all students are achieving at or above in relation to National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics.

Students in Year 10 have opportunities to gain credits towards success in the National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA). Groups are identified for accelerated progress in preparation for Year 11. Many with identified strengths are extended through early NCEA entry. For some this enables a broadening of subject options.

Senior staff, deans and academic mentors identify senior students at risk of under-achievement. They closely track and monitor the progress of individuals. This enables teachers to make well informed decisions about the support or extension these students may require.

Almost all boys experience success across the three levels of NCEA. The college's results are well above those of comparable schools and all schools nationally. Increasingly high percentages of students are gaining Merit and Excellence endorsements. Māori students achieve similar levels to their peers at NCEA Levels 1 and 2 and for university entrance. In recent years the number of scholarships students achieve has increased.

Parent partnerships are promoted through regular face-to-face meetings enhanced by the use of digital technology. Sharing of learning information is immediate, responsive, useful and informative. Parents regularly receive reports that provide them with useful information about their sons’ progress and achievement.

The college council and board of trustees receive regular and detailed information about students' achievement and progress. This ensures they are able to measure progress towards their strategic goals and inform leaders’ decisions about programmes and resources. The board and council are focused on promoting learning and wellbeing, particularly for boys identified as requiring additional support.

3. Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The Lindisfarne College curriculum is highly effective in promoting and supporting student learning.

Students thrive in a culture of high expectations, strongly focused on excellence in academic achievement. The development of curriculum programmes and learning pathways is in response to the aspirations of students and caters successfully for their increasingly diverse needs. Ongoing curriculum and teacher development is well informed by current research and best practice. The key competencies of The New Zealand Curriculum are successfully integrated into faculty and teacher planning.

Students value the opportunities to be successful in a range of sporting, musical and performing arts endeavours. They experience a strong sense of connection and belonging to the college. Students feel valued and well supported. Boys express pride in their achievements and enjoy the sense of brotherhood and family. Retention of students at the college is high.

Staff demonstrate strong commitment to the holistic development of boys. The pastoral team have well defined systems and processes that effectively support students’ welfare. Strategic plans and their implementation appropriately prioritise the promotion of students' wellbeing for success.

Teaching practices promote high levels of engagement and achievement. This is evident in:

  • positive, affirming and mutually respectful relationships with students supporting each other in their learning
  • teachers building on prior knowledge and making connections to future learning
  • regular use of oral feedback with appropriate use of questioning to challenge and extend students' thinking
  • valuable in-class learning support from teacher aides for targeted students.

The recent introduction of digital tools has provided more opportunities for students to take increased ownership and responsibility for their learning. School leaders are developing an e‑learning strategy to empower learners and guide teachers to make the most of new teaching opportunities.

Strengthening the effectiveness of teaching practices is well supported by professional development and appraisal processes.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school is well placed to strengthen the educational success for Māori, as Māori.

High levels of Māori student achievement have been sustained and improved since the previous ERO report. Data is closely tracked and monitored by senior leaders, who focus on supporting the academic success and wellbeing of Māori learners.

The number of Māori students on the school roll is gradually increasing. There is a continued focus on building partnerships with parents that supports their sons' learning.

The college provides courses for students to learn te reo Māori at all levels of the school. Students have opportunities to be involved in kapa haka, Ngā Manu Kōrero and cultural leadership. Te Whaiti Nui-a-Toi Scholarship scheme successfully provides financial support for Māori students with identified educational potential to access places at the college.

The recently appointed head of Māori, supported by a new kaumatua in 2015, should provide the college with an opportunity to build on established links and develop new connections with hapū and iwi.

It is timely for the school to set a strategic direction for the success of Māori students as Māori. Consulting whānau and involving them in the decision-making process should provide a good platform for future developments.

4. Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

Lindisfarne College is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

Strategic planning by school governors continues to support improvements in educational outcomes for students. The rector and school leaders articulate high expectations for student learning and achievement, and of teachers as professionals. They successfully promote a positive learning environment and inclusive culture.

Senior staff rigorously inquire into the impact of whole school initiatives on students' learning. These reviews support good strategic decision making that contributes to continued improvement over time. Departmental self review is developing through the use of teacher inquiry and research.

The next steps are to promote school-wide evaluative inquiry that involves a shared and agreed approach to planned self review. This should enable teachers to gain greater insights into the quality of teaching programmes, initiatives and interventions.

A robust performance management process is improvement focused. Leaders have identified, and ERO agrees, that strengthening teachers’ capacity to inquire into the effectiveness of their practice, will further improve students’ progress and achievement. The use of Tātaiako – Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners should help strengthen teachers' capacity.

Strong links with parents and the wider school community build a successful partnership that supports students' wellbeing and learning.

Provision for international students

Lindisfarne College is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The college has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

At the time of this review, the college had 20 international students. The largest group is from the Pacific French Territories and most live in the school hostel.

Senior students make good progress and perform well in NCEA. They have opportunities to participate in a wide range of sporting, cultural and performing arts programmes.

Provision for students in the school hostel

Lindisfarne College hostel accommodates 245 boarders, approximately half the school roll. It is owned by Lindisfarne College. The hostel owner has attested that all the requirements of the Hostel Regulations are met.

The hostel forms an important part of the tradition of the school and strongly reflects and reinforces its values and special character. Transition into the hostel family is well managed and students settle quickly.

The physical and emotional wellbeing of students is a high priority. Well established systems and processes ensure that students’ welfare is effectively supported.

Boarding students have access to all aspects of the school’s recreational, sporting and performing arts facilities. There is an appropriate focus on academic progress and achievement. Supervised study encourages sound work habits. Additional learning support is available for students who require it. Hostel living integrates seamlessly with the learning side of the school. All hostel managers are teachers.

Carefully-selected and experienced staff are committed to sustaining and improving a positive living environment that complements students’ learning. Hostel staff and their families, the hostel manager and matron all live on site. They are accessible and develop respectful and trusting relationships with students. Boarders value and appreciate the supportive family-like atmosphere.

Parents are well informed through a range of communications about hostel activities and their sons’ progress. Feedback from boarders about hostel systems and relationships is regularly sought and responded to.

The current review should set the long-term strategic direction for the hostel and boarding and guide future decision-making.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Lindisfarne College's special character and vision focus on strong values and excellence. The curriculum is highly effective in promoting student learning. Students thrive in a culture of high expectations, strongly focused on excellence in academic achievement. The college is very well placed to sustain and continue to improve its performance.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Joyce Gebbie
National Manager Review Services
Central Region

About the School

Location

Hastings

Ministry of Education profile number

230

School type

Integrated Secondary (Years 7 to 13)

School roll

496

Number of international students

20

Gender composition

Male 100%

Ethnic composition

Māori
NZ European/Pākehā
Other ethnic groups

10%
85%
  5%

Review team on site

August 2014

Date of this report

29 October 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Education Review
Education Review

December 2011
November 2008
August 2005

 

1. Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Lindisfarne College is an integrated state school for boys in Years 7 to 13 affiliated to the Presbyterian Church situated in Hastings. Approximately fifty percent of students board in the hostel on the school property. Students continue to experience high levels of success in National Certificates of Educational Achievement (NCEA), university entrance and scholarships. Qualifications endorsements in merits and excellences are well above the average for similar boys schools nationally. Students benefit from high expectations for their learning and self management.

The college’s mission statement is focused on providing a balanced education in a Christian setting that emphasises excellence. The school is structured around its four cornerstones of academic achievement, cultural participation, sporting endeavour and the Christian dimension. An emphasis on ‘growing good men’ includes opportunities for students to be of service to the school and local community groups.

2. Learning

How well are students learning – engaging, progressing and achieving?

Students are enthusiastic, motivated and highly engaged learners. They confidently articulate a clear understanding of their role as learners in the school community. Positive relationships between teachers and students result in a constructive learning culture. Teachers demonstrate a strong commitment to providing students with extra assistance to reach their individual goals in classroom programmes, sports and cultural endeavours. High levels of participation in sports and music are supported through the wide range of opportunities available for students. Leadership roles for students are valued and now include specific opportunities in Year 10.

NCEA, scholarship and university entrance results are higher than for similar boys' schools including the percentages of excellence and merit endorsements. Strategic plans aim to improve these further. Students set learning goals and strive for their personal best. Close monitoring by teachers and deans supports students in realising these goals.

Trustees receive a range of useful reports about NCEA trends and patterns over time including comparisons with similar schools. An externally administered value added test confirms the positive impact of teaching on learning for boys in Years 9 to 11.

Students make good progress in reading and mathematics in Years 9 and 10. Standardised assessment data show almost all students achieve at or above expectations and make good progress in Year 9. Senior managers and heads of faculties use this information to review how well programmes cater to students’ strengths and areas of need.

The learning support department provides individual teachers with detailed information to help them cater for students with specific requirements. Students are well tracked and supported in their learning at all levels of the college.

Teachers and senior managers have begun to use the National Standards to monitor student achievement in reading, writing and mathematics in Years 7 and 8. Progressive Achievement Tests (PATs) in reading and mathematics measure student achievement and progress. The board and parents have received information about student attainment in reading, writing and mathematics. However, parents and the board have yet to receive specific information about student achievement in relation to the National Standards.

An initial charter target, to track student progress in relation to National Standard, has been set. Senior managers recognise that they need to strengthen the quality of reporting to provide the board with better information to set improvement targets in 2012.

How well does the school promote Māori student success and success as Māori?

Forty two students identify as Māori. Students have many opportunities to experience success. Individual strengths and talents are a platform for development. The college kaumatua provides strong pastoral care for students and support for whānau. The rector and kaumatua plan to increase formal consultation through more regular whānau hui.

The kaumatua, deans and teachers, including the careers teacher, share responsibility for supporting students to reach their personal goals at school and beyond. Departments consider how effectively their programmes cater for Māori learners and seek ways to encourage participation and improvement.

Māori students achieve as well as, and in some cases better than, their peers at the college. This is higher than for students in schools of a similar type nationally. Strategies are in place to accelerate Māori student progress and valuable gains are evident in the externally administered value added test data.

Students are encouraged to participate in kapa haka, speech competitions and study te reo Māori. Year 12 and 13 students in 2010 wrote a haka and gifted it to the college. Māori students are well represented in significant school leadership roles. Trustees, senior managers and teachers display a commitment to grow the provisions for Māori students in a manner that is meaningful for students and their families.

3. Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The charter provides a clear outline of the school’s vision and values for students’ learning. Teaching and learning programmes for all year levels are developed in department areas. They include a common teaching unit format that expects teachers to use the key competencies to promote better learning outcomes. Clear links to the school charter, improvement goals and The New Zealand Curriculum are evident in most learning areas.

Students' needs and interests are taken into account by staff when making decisions about new courses within the curriculum. There is a planned approach for students to learn and use study and thinking skills to enhance their ownership of learning. Students access a wide range of pathways that appropriately challenge and extend them to achieve their academic and career goals.

A more coordinated approach has begun to develop a middle school curriculum for Years 7 to 10. This initiative seeks to build a shared understanding about teaching and learning programmes. Teachers are developing assessment practices that connect better with the National Standards and NCEA.

Teachers use a wide range of positive teaching strategies including regular student reflection on learning and identifying what they need to do next. Regular surveys of students’ opinions inform teaching programmes. Prior knowledge is built-on and extended through effective questioning. Feedback and feed forward affirm individual strengths and identify their next steps for learning.

Professional learning and development contributes to a wider range of research based approaches to teaching. Teachers show a commitment to continuing to improve their professional practices to support higher levels of student engagement in learning. The school is involved in international research into promoting boys’ education. There is a sustained strategic focus on building teacher capacity to improve learning.

Teachers inquire into assessment results to consider which teaching practices are making the biggest difference for students. Faculty heads and teachers closely analyse student achievement information in order to further improve the quality of the results.

Teachers cater for the range of learners in classrooms. Learners with special abilities and talents are provided with a range of personalised extension and acceleration opportunities. Regular monitoring and reviews of the impact of these programmes improves their effectiveness.

4. Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

Senior managers provide clear, future focused professional leadership. The rector, appointed in May 2010 is leading a management team combining individual members' complementary strengths and skills. There is a considered and deliberate approach to managing change. The leadership team works constructively with faculty heads and teachers to focus on strategies that allow students to achieve to the best of their ability.

An experienced college council, comprising the board of trustees and board of proprietors, provides stability and continuity in governance. A comprehensive policy framework and regular review processes support board operations. Trustees have a clear understanding of their roles and responsibilities. They work collaboratively with senior managers. There is a commitment to fostering strong family connections through regular school events, celebrations of student success and direct links with the Parents’ and Friends’ Association. The council focuses strongly on providing students with an attractive, modern and well-resourced learning environment. Recent significant improvements to the property include an extensive performing arts centre.

Self review processes are well-developed at the strategic level of school. These practices use a broad-based approach to improving student achievement. Review practices in faculties and in classrooms are developing. Some departments model robust processes for responding to data linked to strategic goals. Senior managers identify the need to continue to strengthen review practices across learning areas and classrooms. ERO's external evaluation confirms that this is a suitable area for development.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with the Code. ERO’s investigations confirmed that the school’s self review processes meet requirements. Students are provided with high quality pastoral care.

Sixteen international students attend the school. Most students board at the school hostel. English language learning support is well targeted to meet individual needs. Comprehensive records of learning show that students make substantial English language progress during their time at the school. Teachers in other subject areas use good strategies to assist learners. Parents regularly receive useful reports about students’ progress each term.

Students are well integrated into the life of the school. They confidently participate in academic, cultural and sporting opportunities. Many students are encouraged to stay with families during weekends and holidays.

ERO identifies the following areas for further review and development:

  • practices for storing student records should be strengthened to ensure they are centralised
  • the college council should receive regular formal reports about international students’ academic, cultural and sporting progress
  • regular formal reviews of how well the international student programme is meeting its intended aims should be undertaken and reported to the college council.

Provision for students in the school hostel

Approximately fifty percent of students board at the hostel. Close connections between the boarding houses and the school are well supported with teachers employed as house staff. A family like atmosphere with clear expectations for study and behaviour supports students.

Positive respectful relationships between staff and students are evident. School facilities and resources are readily available for students to use study or practice for sporting and cultural activities. Hostel managers participate in appropriate training to increase their knowledge of working in a boarding school environment. A recent hostel review emphasises the importance of caring and knowledgeable hostel staff. There are clear expectations and understandings about the roles and responsibilities of students and staff.

Student well-being and safety are viewed as key priorities. Regular surveys check that students are considerate of each other. There is a shared understanding that bullying is not acceptable and there are multiple ways for students to discuss and raise any concerns. Hostel routines are responsive and flexible with older students being encouraged to be more self-reliant. Students’ opinions are sought, responded to proactively and valued by staff.

Regular communication between parents is encouraged. There is a focus on continuing to grow the partnership between students, families and the school through regular information sharing.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

In order to improve current practice, the board should:

  • receive more regular formal reports on Years 7 and 8 student achievement and progress in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics
  • ensure annual improvement targets for Years 7 and 8 contain a summary of the baseline data in relation to the National Standards, used to inform the target.

In undertaking its commitment to report against National Standards the college provides detailed information on its Year 7 and 8 students using PAT data and curriculum levels with useful comments for parents and boys. While these reports refer to National Standards, they do not clearly state achievement in relation to the Standards. The college council is reviewing this aspect of the school’s reporting procedures.

  • National Administration Guidelines 2A (a)The school board, with the principal and teaching staff must report in writing to students enrolled in Years 1 to 8, and their parents, on the students’ progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Kathleen Atkins

National Manager Review Services Central Region

5 December 2011

About the School

Location

Hastings

Ministry of Education profile number

230

School type

Integrated Secondary Years 7 to 15

Decile1

10

School roll

496

Number of international students

16

Gender composition

Male 100%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Asian

Other

84%

8%

3%

5%

Special Features

Boarding Hostel

Review team on site

September 2011

Date of this report

5 December 2011

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

November 2008

August 2005

August 2002

1 School deciles range from 1 to 10. Decile 1 schools draw their students from low socio-economic communities and at the other end of the range, decile 10 schools draw their students from high socio-economic communities. Deciles are used to provide funding to state and state integrated schools. The lower the school’s decile the more funding it receives. A school’s decile is in no way linked to the quality of education it provides.