West End Te Kura O Morere

West End Te Kura Ō Mōrere - 27/11/2017

Summary

West End Te Kura Ō Mōrere is located in New Plymouth. At the time of this ERO review the roll was 373 with 32% of students identifying as Māori. There has been steady roll growth over the past few years, particularly in enrolments of Māori children.

The school was gifted a new name, West End Te Kura Ō Mōrere, earlier this year after two years of consultation with local iwi and hapū, Te Atiawa and Ngāti Te Whiti.

The school’s shared values of ‘common sense, cooperation and consideration’ underpin and guide teaching and learning. The school has responded well to the areas for improvement identified in the July 2014 ERO report.

Over the past three years leaders and teachers have given more priority to addressing the underachievement of Māori learners and have strengthened their cultural practices.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school responds well to those Māori and other students whose progress needs acceleration. However, disparity remains between the overall achievement of Māori children at the school and their non-Māori peers.

Most students achieve at or above in relation to National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. The data shows that Māori learners are not achieving as well as their peers and overall more boys are below expectations than girls. Pacific and Asian students achieve well.

The knowledgeable leadership team work collaboratively to ensure line of sight is maintained from what is espoused in the school’s goals, vision and targets for equity and excellence, to enactment through the curriculum and teaching and learning.

The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school has established well considered processes to identify and respond to Māori learners and other students whose learning and achievement need acceleration. This supports a cohesive approach across all levels of the school.

Most students achieve at or above in relation to National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. The data shows that Māori learners are not achieving as well as their peers and more boys are below than girls. Pacific and Asian students achieve well. At the end of 2016, over two thirds of all students achieved above for reading, writing and mathematics. Year 6 students achieved consistently higher levels than the whole school cohort.

Teachers know the students well. Syndicate meetings give priority to discussing particular teaching strategies that enable improvement of target students. The rate of progress for each child is tracked each term. Trends and patterns are identified over time. There is evidence of acceleration for many students.

The valued outcomes articulated in the New Zealand Curriculum underpin the school’s focus on developing cooperative, considerate students who demonstrate an ‘I can do’ attitude.

Children with high needs are identified. Appropriate interventions are put in place to support their needs, including the use of external expertise.

Teachers work collaboratively in their teams, school wide and across schools to moderate judgements. A well-considered approach supports dependability of decisions about National Standards in relation to reading, writing and mathematics.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school has a wide range of effective processes that support the achievement of equity and excellence. There is a relentless focus on accelerating Māori student achievement and reducing disparity for Māori and boys.

Students experience an inclusive and culturally responsive curriculum with an appropriate focus on literacy and mathematics. Teachers use a range of effective strategies and deliberate actions to engage students in purposeful learning within productive, calm learning environments. Positive, reciprocal relationships are highly evident across the school. A range of appropriate pastoral care initiatives cater for students’ wellbeing for learning. Students have a range of leadership roles across the school.

Knowledgeable leaders work collaboratively to support teachers to promote positive learning outcomes for students. Staff expertise, strengths and interests are used in relevant leadership opportunities. Teachers and leaders are reflective practitioners. Leaders have established clear, well aligned processes and expectations that guide staff capability building. The appraisal process is responsive to teachers’ development needs and supports them to improve their practice.

Parents, whānau and community are welcomed and involved in school activities. They are valued partners in children’s learning. Hapū and iwi support has built and extended staff knowledge of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori.

Trustees are well informed about student achievement and practice. They increasingly interrogate information they receive. The board prioritises student wellbeing and learning. Target setting, strategic and annual planning is coherent and aligned to the school’s vision and values. Parents, teachers and students are regularly consulted. Their opinions are valued and used to inform decision making.

Internal evaluation is valued as a tool to promote improvement at all levels of school operation. Leaders and teachers reflect on the effectiveness of their practice in improving outcomes for students. They identify what is successful and how this can be transferred to other situations.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

The school has a range of processes that are effective in enabling and promoting the achievement of equity and excellence.

School leaders recognise the need to continue to embed and sustain processes and practice to further accelerate learning and progress. They have identified that they need to:

  • more deliberately differentiate Māori and other groups in annual achievement targets
  • report termly to trustees on progress and achievement of identified target students
  • further support teachers to continue to strengthen their analysis of achievement data.

This should further sharpen the focus on accelerating learning to achieve equity and excellence for all students.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school demonstrates progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Patricia Davey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

27 November 2017

About the school

Location

New Plymouth

Ministry of Education profile number

2265

School type

Contributing Primary (Years 1 – 6)

School roll

373

Gender composition

Male 56%, Female 44%

Ethnic composition

Māori 32%
Pākehā 54%
Asian 7%
Other ethnic groups 7%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

September 2017

Date of this report

27 November 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review July 2014
Education Review June 2011
Education Review May 2008

West End School (New Plymouth) - 16/06/2014

Findings

Students learn and achieve well in a positive, welcoming environment. Teacher student relationships are supportive and respectful. Well established pastoral care and special needs systems effectively nurture student wellbeing. Teachers reflect and inquire into their practice. Setting more specific, measurable targets should sharpen schoolwide focus in reporting student outcomes.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

West End School, centrally located in New Plymouth, caters for students in Years 1 to 6. At the time of this review it had a roll of 323 students, of whom 87 identify as Māori.

The school’s mission statement is “to develop responsible citizens who are confident, creative, actively involved life-long learners”. This mission and the “3C’s” values, of Common Sense, Co-operation and Consideration, underpin strategic direction, school systems and classroom programmes. There are high expectations for student engagement and learning.

School leaders responded positively to areas identified in ERO's 2010 report. Teachers are involved in planned, ongoing professional learning and development with a major emphasis on quality teaching practice and a specific recent focus on writing.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Well analysed achievement information is effectively and regularly used by senior leaders and teachers to improve learning outcomes for students.

Senior staff recognise and respond appropriately to trends and patterns for groups and cohorts. Students in need of additional support or acceleration are identified. Their progress, as with all students, is well monitored during the year. Clear reports to the board are used to make ongoing resourcing decisions.

Teachers use achievement data to inquire into their teaching, plan and implement well-constructed learning programmes. They use an appropriate range of tools to establish baseline data and support overall judgements on individuals' progress. Transitions into, through and from the school are well considered and carefully managed for groups and individual students.

The school reports that the majority of students achieve at or above the relevant National Standard in reading, writing and mathematics. School targets for 2014 are explicitly aimed at raising the achievement of Māori students to match schoolwide levels. Pacific students’ overall achievement is comparable to the majority. Parents receive regular reports on their children's learning, with opportunities for specific meetings with teachers to discuss wellbeing, progress and shared strategies.

Teachers are collaboratively refining systems and processes related to the making of overall teacher judgements in relation to National Standards. Effective moderation processes are regularly reviewed and refined to further improve consistency and reliability.

School leaders recognise that setting more specific, measurable targets should sharpen schoolwide focus. It should also enable more effective monitoring and reporting of progress and student outcomes.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Student engagement, learning and achievement are well supported by the curriculum.

A clear, overarching framework supports the shared understanding and common approach to teaching and learning. Students respond positively to the high expectation set for their engagement, learning and behaviour. Explicit guidelines for teachers inform teaching and teacher inquiry into practice.

The curriculum has a strong focus on literacy and numeracy. It incorporates good use of local and relevant contexts that give authenticity to student learning. The West End learner profile links well with The New Zealand Curriculum key competencies. The core "3C’s" values are highly evident. Extensive opportunities are made available for students to participate and succeed in academic, sporting, cultural and leadership activities.

Teaching is effective. Teachers reflect and inquire into their practice. Research and professional development underpin a strong collegial, knowledgeable learning culture. Computer technology is effectively used to support teaching and learning.

Students are encouraged to take increasing responsibility for their progress and achievement. In class they are on task and engaged in their learning. Classrooms are settled learning environments with established routines.

School leaders have identified it is timely to revisit and review the curriculum including provision for gifted and talented students. An initial series of meetings and consultation with staff has begun.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Senior staff have a strategic approach to improving outcomes for Māori students, as Māori. The Māori Education Strategy: Ka Hikitia - Accelerating Success is used as a guiding document. Staff are involved in national and local Māori achievement initiatives. The principal and Māori trustee are strengthening links with whānau, hapu and iwi.

A combined staff and board rōpu is working to raise the schoolwide profile of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori. School leaders actively promote Māori student leadership and role models. There are many opportunities for parents and families to celebrate student success.

Senior leaders should consider adopting similar strategies for the families of Pacific students to support their successful engagement and achievement in learning.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance. Factors contributing to this include:

  • the board’s strategic focus on student achievement and continual improvement
  • shared understanding and expectations through clear alignment between charter, strategic plan and annual plan to professional development and appraisal
  • effective professional leadership by the principal, well supported by knowledgeable, collaborative senior leaders with complementary skills and strengths
  • collegial, consultative staff, committed to continual improvement and success for all.

Well-established pastoral care and special needs systems and processes effectively nurture student wellbeing. Students benefit from supportive, respectful relationships and the positive learning environment. There are close partnerships with whānau and parents.

There is an established culture of critical reflection, schoolwide. School leaders regularly review school operations and student outcomes. They have identified and are refining ways in which self review can be further developed and strengthened.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Students learn and achieve well in a positive, welcoming environment. Teacher student relationships are supportive and respectful. Well established pastoral care and special needs systems effectively nurture student wellbeing. Teachers reflect and inquire into their practice. Setting more specific, measurable targets should sharpen schoolwide focus in reporting student outcomes.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services Central Region

16 July 2014

About the School

Location

New Plymouth

Ministry of Education profile number

2265

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

323

Gender composition

Male 57%, Female 43%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Pacific

Other European

Asian

Other ethnic groups

27%

62%

3%

3%

2%

3%

Review team on site

May 2014

Date of this report

16 July 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

June 2011

May 2008

May 2005