Takarunga Playcentre

Education institution number:
22052
Service type:
Playcentre
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
19
Telephone:
Address:

1-26 Kerr Street, Devonport, Auckland

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1 Evaluation of Takarunga Playcentre

How well placed is Takarunga Playcentre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Takarunga Playcentre is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Takarunga Playcentre operates as a parent cooperative and is licensed for 29 children, including 10 children under two years of age. The centre offers three sessions a week. Two sessions are held on site, one session is held off-site in the outdoors. Most children attend two or three sessions.

Programmes for children are underpinned by the Playcentre philosophy of parents and children playing and learning together. The centre's philosophy focuses on children playing in a creative and fun environment, choosing their own activities and working at their own pace.

The centre is part of the newly established Northern North Island Playcentre Region. Regional systems support centre members to manage their centres and to provide educational programmes for their children. Playcentre personnel also provide adult education programmes for parents/whānau to achieve Playcentre qualifications.

Since the 2014 ERO evaluation most centre members are new. Current members have focused on building membership numbers, and increasing new members' qualifications. New members are committed to increasing their Playcentre qualification levels.

This review is one of 12 Playcentres in the Northern North Island Playcentre Region.

The Review Findings

Children at Takarunga Playcentre are settled, happy and confident. They have a strong sense of wellbeing and show pride in being part of their centre. The inclusive culture is welcoming and supports whānau to build relationships within the centre and with the local Devonport community.

Children enjoy opportunities to lead their learning. Parents work alongside children to support them to develop their oral language and communication skills. Programme plans are informed by observation of children's interests and discussion. Most plans are based on activities provided by members. The off-site session effectively promotes children's investigation, and has strong links to science and nature. Parents/whānau could consider ways to capture and build onto these experiences in the onsite planning sessions.

The spacious learning environments provide ample room for children to be creative and take risks in their learning as they move freely around the centre. The outdoor environment provides its own natural physical challenges for children to explore. The indoor environment provides a wide range of learning resources for children to use. It is timely to review learning environments to ensure that resources continue to promote and extend children's learning.

Children have opportunities to learn te reo Māori through waiata and events. A Māori perspective is integrated well into the off-site session, and incorporates local history and the uniqueness of the area.

Children's portfolios are individual and informative. They document what children are learning. Newer centre members are well supported to build their knowledge and understanding about recording children’s learning progress.

Experienced members provide mentoring and professional support for newer members. Emergent leadership is encouraged, and adults work collaboratively.

Centre members use a useful framework to guide their internal evaluation. Members could strengthen documentation about how internal evaluation has led to improved outcomes for children. An annual plan successfully guides centre direction and key focus areas.

The regional structure is replacing individual Playcentre Associations. Newly appointed regional personnel are making good progress in building on existing systems and establishing effective regional management structures for supporting centres. Centre support workers are guided by regional centre support coordinators. Systems are being developed for monitoring the quality of programmes for children, adult education levels, and health and safety requirements.

Key Next Steps

Next steps for centre members are:

  • reviewing all learning environments to ensure children have access to high quality resources

  • strengthening on-site programme planning that builds on the off-site session, with links to Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum.

The Northern North Island Playcentre regional manager (acting) and support personnel agree that key next steps include:

  • implementing and embedding the revised Playcentre adult education programme

  • establishing a framework to evaluate the effectiveness of centre support systems, roles and processes.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Takarunga Playcentre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Takarunga Playcentre will be in three years.

Steve Tanner

Director Review and Improvement Services Northern

Northern Region

19 February 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Devonport, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

22052

Licence type

Playcentre

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

29 children, including up to 10 aged under 2

Service roll

17

Gender composition

Boys 9 Girls 8

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
other ethnic groups

2
9
6

Review team on site

November 2018

Date of this report

19 February 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

March 2014

Education Review

November 2010

Education Review

March 2008

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Takarunga Playcentre

How well placed is Takarunga Playcentre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Takarunga Playcentre, in Devonport, is a well established centre that runs as a parent cooperative. Centre practices are based on playcentre philosophy of families learning and growing together. The centre is open for five sessions per week and caters for children from birth to school age. On the day of the review there were just six children attending a special session for four year old children.

Families of children attending come from many different countries, making this a culturally rich environment. Parents report that the centre offers valued opportunities for children and their families to establish friendships and networks.

The centre has had a very positive ERO reporting history. Since the 2010 ERO report the centre has continued to operate efficiently and effectively.

The centre operates as part of the North Shore Playcentre Association. The association is the umbrella organisation for 21 playcentres situated in North Auckland. Many of these centres are semi-rural. The association manages and distributes funding to the centres and provides a training programme for parents/whānau to achieve playcentre qualifications. It also has good systems to support centre members to manage the playcentres and to provide educational programmes for children. The association is currently reviewing many aspects of its operations to help reduce the administrative workload for its members.

This review was part of a cluster of seven reviews in the North Shore Playcentre Association.

The Review Findings

Takarunga Playcentre is very well placed to provide positive learning outcomes for children.

Children benefit from an inclusive environment that helps them to gain confidence when relating with children and adults other than their parents. Infants and toddlers benefit from interacting with older children and multiple adults. A well resourced environment offers a wide range of possibilities for children’s creative and exploratory learning. Regular use of the adjoining Mt Victoria reserve and excursions in the local Devonport area grow children’s awareness of their local world.

Curriculum programmes promote children’s active participation in learning. They focus on developing children’s curiosity, problem-solving skills and social competence. A well designed programme offers older children experiences to participate in group learning in preparation for their transition to school. This programme offers more focused, interactive learning connected with the family session programmes.

Centre members’ commitment to the playcentre philosophy is evident as they work cooperatively in planning and implementing a child-focused programme. Adults’ shared sense of purpose and clear delegation of roles enable sessions to focus on promoting children’s learning. Continual self review helps to ensure that sessional programmes are connected and responsive to the interests and developmental needs of different age groups.

Children have opportunity to learn about multiple languages and cultures. Centre members and the association have a strong commitment to Te Tiriti o Waitangi and to building both adults’ and children’s familiarity with te reo and tikanga Māori. A bicultural partnership with Māori whānau is evident in association operations.

The centre is very well managed. Parents are encouraged to be involved in centre administration and to contribute to decision-making. Adults support and encourage each other in their parenting and education roles. Systematic and responsive reviewing and planning processes guide the management of the centre. Committee members’ enthusiasm and commitment promotes continuing centre growth and improvement.

The association management team takes responsibility for specific tasks relating to the function of the association. Management team members are committed to and enthusiastic about their involvement in playcentre. They actively foster emergent leadership to help sustain the association and demonstrate the professional leadership necessary to help the association respond to change, make decisions and manage issues as they arise. The North Shore Playcentre Association provides effective support to help this centre remain very well placed to provide positive outcomes for children.

Key Next Steps

ERO is confident in centre members’ capability to promote positive outcomes for children’s learning and development through ongoing self review. ERO recommends members continue to monitor the effectiveness of centre practices and identify future improvements.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Takarunga Playcentre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Takarunga Playcentre will be in four years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

7 March 2014

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Devonport, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

22052

Licence type

Playcentre

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

29 children, including up to 10 aged under 2

Service roll

29

Gender composition

Girls 16

Boys 13

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Cook Island Māori

Latin American

Tongan

Other European

Other

1

9

3

3

1

11

1

Review team on site

October 2013

Date of this report

7 March 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

November 2010

 

Education Review

March 2008

 

Education Review

October 2004

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.