Ngaere School

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Education institution number:
2205
School type:
Full Primary
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
155
Telephone:
Address:

4355 Mountain Road, Stratford

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School Context

Ngaere School is situated between Stratford and Eltham, in rural Taranaki. It has 163 students from Years 1 to 8, and 17% are Māori. Since the August 2016 ERO report, several changes have occurred to staffing and after recent elections, at governance level.

The vision is for all children seeks to promote Living and Learning With RESPECT, Te ora me, te ako me, te whakaute.

Strategic goals from 2019 to 2021 are focused on:

  • student achievement, in order that all learners, including Māori and priority students experience success
  • providing an environment to develop and support future-focused learners who can drive their own learning by effective teaching
  • achieving the values of respect and strengthening all learners to be confident risk takers demonstrating a strong work ethic and positive attitude
  • strengthening partnership with families and whānau for students to feel supported in their learning.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, school wide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • student progress and achievement
  • attendance.

The school is part of the Central Taranaki Kāhui Ako.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

Reported outcomes at the end of 2018 in reading, writing and mathematics indicate that overtime, from 2016, outcomes for students have moved noticeably in achieving equitable achievement outcomes for students. Most students, including Māori learners achieved curriculum level expectations in reading, writing and mathematics.

High levels of attendance are achieved by nearly all students.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

School processes and practices respond well in meeting the needs of those Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. In 2018 and up to mid-year 2019, most students requiring their progress accelerated in reading, writing and mathematics made expected progress with some accelerating their achievement. Higher acceleration rates for learners were achieved in reading and mathematics.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Leaders, teachers and trustees collectively pursue the school’s curriculum vision for learner success.

Strategic and annual planning systematically guides ongoing development toward determined priorities. Teachers are highly collaborative, engaging purposefully with other educational partners to foster shared practices designed to promote equitable and excellent outcomes for all students. Involvement in professional learning and development (PLD) has strengthened teacher practice and improved outcomes for learners. Systematic inquiry processes are well aligned to PLD priorities. These inquiries provide the basis for understanding how well-planned actions are collectively building the capability of staff to match the school’s future-focused curriculum vision.

Leaders and teachers use a range of effective strategies to achieve equitable outcomes for students. Transition to school is well managed to reflect the needs of students, parents and whānau. Assessments are well used by teachers to identify, plan and address the needs of individual students. Collaborative action plans encourage meaningful learning partnerships with parents, families and whānau, reflecting appropriate individual goals for the child’s development. Tracking and monitoring of student progress occurs regularly between staff, leading to actions that adapt to changes in children’s learning needs. Reported information ensures the board is well informed when making resourcing decisions that benefit outcomes for learners.

Student are well engaged at school. Classroom environments are positive and purposeful learning spaces. The enacted curriculum supports a wide range of experiences for students. Te ao Māori is increasingly part of each student’s schooling experience. This includes learning through relevant contexts that encompass the themes of sustainability and caring for the local environment. Shared school values are well established, forming the basis for positive interactions between individuals, their peers and staff. Student voice is sought, and their leadership is valued, contributing to the positive school culture.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Current curriculum development is focused on building teacher capability and practice to:

  • encourage students in determining their individual learning pathways,

  • fully acknowledge Maori learners’ culture, language and identity in all facets of the curriculum.

PLD is well-aligned to progressing these priorities. As agreed practices are enhanced, teachers should revise and document their shared expectations for teaching and learning. This is needed to support the collective understanding of curriculum practice between staff. These expectations should also form the basis for inquiry and evaluation into how well the school’s curriculum vision impacts on students.

Teachers are in the process of adapting their assessment practices to better enable students to direct their individual learner pathways. Leaders should continue to develop the collective knowledge of teachers in relation to curriculum levels. Consolidating teacher knowledge and use of assessment should enhance the role of students in guiding outcomes toward their specific learning goals.

3 Board Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Children’s Act 2014.

4 ERO’s Overall Judgement

On the basis of the findings of this review, ERO’s overall evaluation judgement of Ngaere School’s performance in achieving valued outcomes for its students is: Well placed.

ERO’s Framework: Overall School Performance is available on ERO’s website.

5 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • using effective teaching strategies and practices that achieve equitable outcomes for students
  • creating an inclusive learning environment that supports the purposeful engagement of students in a wide range of curriculum learning experiences
  • collaborative practice between leaders, teachers, trustees and the school community that pursues the school’s valued outcomes and guides ongoing development.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • further development of curriculum and assessment practice to strengthen student involvement in directing their individual learning pathways
  • building culturally responsive practice to encompass Māori students’ culture, language and identity across the curriculum.

Actions for compliance

ERO identified non-compliance in relation to developing relevant guidelines on the use of physical restraint and ensuring consultation with the community to develop a statement on the delivery of the health curriculum.

To address this, the board of trustees must:

  • adopt a statement on the delivery of the health curriculum after consultation with the community
    [Section 60B Education Act 1989]
  • develop guidelines on the use of physical restraint.
    [Sections 139AB to 139AE Education Act 1989]

Phillip Cowie

Director Review and Improvement Services Central

Central Region

23 September 2019

About the school

Location

Taranaki

Ministry of Education profile number

2205

School type

Full Primary Years 1 to 8

School roll

163

Gender composition

Male 52%, Female 48%

Ethnic composition

Māori 17%
NZ European/Pākehā 79%
Other ethnicities 4%

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

Yes

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

August 2019

Date of this report

23 September 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, August 2016
Education Review, May 2013
Education Review, May 2010

1 Context

Ngaere School is situated between Stratford and Eltham in rural Taranaki. It caters for students from Years 1 to 8. A new principal and a number of new teachers have been appointed since the
May 2013 ERO report. Board of trustee elections were taking place at the time of the review. A home zone is in place. The roll of 152 students, includes 16% who identify as Māori.

2 Equity and excellence

The vision and valued outcomes defined by the school for all children are:

Living and Learning With RESPECT

Every student will leave Ngaere School with literacy, numeracy and problem solving skills that enable them to achieve at a personal level of excellence and function as contributing members of the community in which they live.

The school’s achievement information shows that the majority of students achieve at or above in relation to the respective National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. In 2015, Māori students' achievement was similar to that of their peers. There has been an overall drop in reported achievement over the past three years. Leaders have a renewed focus on internal moderation processes to support teachers to make valid, consistent overall teacher judgements when assessing students' achievement.

Since the previous ERO evaluation the school has:

  • participated in ongoing, externally facilitated, professional learning and teacher inquiry to build awareness and capacity in mathematics
  • collaborated across schools within a local cluster, focusing on writing
  • worked to strengthen the use of achievement information to support planning and assessment at classroom level.
  • enhanced the use of digital technology to support teaching and learning
  • introduced a perceptual motor programme for the junior school.

3 Accelerating achievement

How effectively does this school respond to Māori children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

While many Māori students make progress, a significant proportion do not have their achievement accelerated to meet the National Standards by the end of Year 8.

Leaders and teachers are working to improve the effectiveness of their response to meeting the learning needs of Māori children in reading, writing and mathematics. Students' individual needs are well identified. Newly introduced systems are in place to monitor and track Māori student progress and achievement.

How effectively does this school respond to other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

Students' individual needs are well identified. Newly introduced systems are in place to monitor and track student progress and achievement. The special needs register records specific interventions for students. Most students make expected progress with a number having their learning and achievement accelerated.

4 School conditions

How effectively do the school’s curriculum and other organisational processes and practices develop and enact the school’s vision, values, goals and targets for equity and excellence?

The school is developing its capability to enact its vision, values and targets for equity and excellence.

The board focuses on providing a wide range of opportunities for students and improving student outcomes. Newly elected trustees should benefit from using the sound operations manual and policy framework to guide board operation.

Senior leaders work collaboratively to improve teaching and learning. They have a clear vision for the school and are working strategically to provide positive outcomes for students. The newly reviewed and refined appraisal system should better support teacher development and provide evidence against the Practising Teacher Criteria.

School targets in reading, writing and mathematics are about overall levels of achievement against National Standards. Accelerated progress is expected for specific target groups. Leaders and teachers are working to strengthen systems to use assessment information to effectively respond to identified student needs.  Enhancing leaders' ability to monitor, track and regularly report student progress is a key next step.

The school values aspects of tikanga Māori.  A range of strategies is in place to build on Māori students’ sense of belonging. These include kapa haka, leadership roles and schoolwide timetabled te reo classes. Trustees intend to enhance engagement with the Māori community. 

There is a wide range of sporting, cultural, artistic and academic opportunities for students to participate in and enjoy success. The school's overarching curriculum document includes the principles, values and key competencies of The New Zealand Curriculum and learning area implementation plans. There is a strong focus on literacy and numeracy. Leaders have introduced a number of new programmes and initiatives. It is now appropriate to review the school's curriculum to more closely align with and include these developments. Including a career programme and second language learning opportunities for students in Years 7 to 8 is a priority.

There is a positive, affirming and highly supportive school culture that is inclusive and welcoming. The holistic wellbeing of each student is a priority. Parents, whānau and community are highly supportive with large numbers actively involved in many aspects of school life. ERO observed settled classes and engaged students. There are positive and respectful relationships between teachers and students. Students spoke positively to ERO about their school. 

School leaders review progress and the effectiveness of school operation. They are developing their use of evidence linked to student outcomes to support decision making. Leaders recognise the importance of enhancing the school's internal evaluation capacity. Refining strategic and other planning to include specific indicators of expected high quality outcomes should support their ability to effectively evaluate the impact of initiatives and programmes.

5 Going forward

How well placed is the school to achieve and sustain equitable and excellent outcomes for all children?

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated
  • have not yet developed approaches that effectively meet the needs of each child
  • have not yet ensured the school is well placed to achieve and sustain equitable and excellent outcomes for all children.

Action: The board, principal and teachers should participate in an internal evaluation workshop. They should use this workshop, ERO exemplars of good practice and the School Evaluation Indicators to address the findings of this evaluation and develop a Raising Achievement Plan that includes a significant focus on building teacher capability to accelerate learning and achievement.

As part of this review ERO will continue to monitor the school’s Raising Achievement Plan and the progress the school makes. ERO is likely to carry out the next full review in three years.

6 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and Self Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

board administration

  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance
  • compliance with the provisions of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014. 

During the course of the review a number of areas of non-compliance were identified. To address these trustees and leaders must:

  • report to parents in writing twice yearly against National Standards, including anniversary reporting at 40, 80 and 120 weeks
    [National Administration Guideline2A(a)] 
  • provide a career education programme for Years 7 and 8
    [National Administration Guideline1 (f)]
  • provide students with opportunity to learn second or subsequent languages
    [The New Zealand Curriculum]
  • in consultation with the school's Māori community, develop and make known to the school's community policies, plans and targets for improving the achievement of Māori students.
    [National Administration Guideline1 (e)]

7 Recommendations

ERO and school leaders agree that key next steps for ongoing development are:

  • strengthening the use of assessment information to effectively respond to identified student needs and enhance the school's ability to monitor, track and regularly report progress
  • reviewing the school's curriculum to more closely align with and include new initiatives, programmes and developments.
  • enhancing the school's internal evaluation capacity.  Refining strategic and other planning to include specific indicators of expected high quality outcomes should support leaders' ability to evaluate the impact of initiatives and programmes and inform ongoing improvement to student outcomes. 

Joyce Gebbie
Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

9 August 2016

About the school

Location

Stratford, Taranaki

Ministry of Education profile number

2205

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

152

Gender composition

Male 53%  Female 47%

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Other ethnic groups

16%
80%
  4%

Review team on site

May 2016

Date of this report

9 August 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Education Review
Education Review

May 2013
May 2010
December 2006