Laingholm Playcentre

Education institution number:
22024
Service type:
Playcentre
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
24
Telephone:
Address:

4 Lookout Drive, Laingholm

View on map

1 Evaluation of Laingholm Playcentre

How well placed is Laingholm Playcentre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Laingholm Playcentre in West Auckland is a parent-cooperative service that provides three morning sessions each week. Programmes for children are underpinned by the Playcentre philosophy of parents and children playing and learning together. The centre is able to cater for 26 children, including 15 up to two years of age.

The centre is part of the newly-established Auckland Central Playcentre Region. Regional systems support centre members to manage their centres and to provide educational programmes for their children. Playcentre personnel also provide training programmes for parents/whānau to achieve Playcentre qualifications.

ERO's 2015 report supported centre members' next steps, which included improving assessment records, extending older children's complex play and continuing to promote new leadership through in-centre support. The majority of members are new to the centre since the 2015 review.

This review was part of a cluster of three reviews in the Auckland Central Playcentre Region.

The Review Findings

Centre members work well together to provide programmes that depend on shared skills and a strong level of cooperation and mutual support. The centre has a strong sense of family, with all adults taking responsibility for the welcome and inclusion of children and their families.

Children are confident and enthusiastic in their play with others, and in their trusting relationships with adults. They are articulate and demonstrate well-developed skills and tuakana/teina relationships. Adults work closely with children to support them to feel successful and to extend their play.

Learning programmes are based on children's interests and their input to decision-making about their play. The 'Hui Taima' at the end of each session is an insightful sharing that demonstrates adults' knowledge of and observations of children. Children take a leadership role in this Hui by contributing their ideas for future sessions.

Centre members apply a useful framework for assessment and planning. They contribute to all children's portfolios, creating attractive, lasting records of children's development over time. The redevelopment of Playcentre adult education courses includes appropriate support for the planning cycle to continue to develop over time. Centre members are using self review to guide improvements and the quality of learning programmes.

Centre members have made a determined effort to embed te reo Māori into programmes and the learning environment. Displays support adults' understanding of words and phrases. Karakia, waiata and incidental words in conversations provide children with developing understanding of the dual cultural heritage of New Zealand. The centre vision includes reference to te Tiriti o Waitangi as a guiding document.

The regional management team takes responsibility for supporting effective operations. The team is aware of the strengths and needs of each centre and provides professional leadership to promote improvement and growth. Centre support workers are guided by regional centre support coordinators. Individual and effective support helps each centre to continue to develop quality programmes for children, and sound health and safety monitoring requirements.

Key Next Steps

Key next steps for improvement should include continuing to:

  • plan for centre sustainability

  • extend processes for assessment, programme planning and evaluation

  • strengthen bicultural programmes

  • develop ways of using and regularly revisiting annual and strategic planning so it is a meaningful guide for centre members both in the short term and over time.

To enhance practices in all Auckland Region Playcentres, the regional manager and support personnel should consider ways to:

  • better support adult education, with consideration about the timing of workshops

  • provide additional support to increase centre members' understanding and use of effective assessment, planning and evaluation processes, bicultural practices and internal evaluation

  • support centres to further develop and link strategic and annual planning to create more systematic consideration of the long-term needs within their centres.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Laingholm Playcentre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Laingholm Playcentre will be in three years.

Steve Tanner

Director Review and Improvement Services

Te Tai Raki - Northern Region

17 January 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Laingholm, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

22024

Licence type

Playcentre

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

26 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Service roll

26

Gender composition

Boys 14 Girls 12

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
other ethnic groups

2
23
1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

October 2018

Date of this report

17 January 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

May 2015

Education Review

May 2012

Education Review

January 2009

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Laingholm Playcentre

How well placed is Laingholm Playcentre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Laingholm Playcentre in West Auckland is a parent-led service that provides four morning sessions each week. It is a family cooperative and caters for up to 26 children per session from birth to school age.

Laingholm Playcentre’s philosophy is based on the Playcentre philosophy that children learn through child-led play with the support of their parents as first educators.

The centre is part of the Auckland Playcentres Association, which provides Playcentre adult education, frameworks of management, policies and procedures, and personnel support. Each centre contributes to the make-up of the Association and has representatives at Association level.

At present the Playcentre Federation is undertaking a restructure with the aim of maintaining the viability of Playcentres throughout New Zealand. This is likely to change the current structure of the Auckland Playcentres Association.

The centre's 2012 ERO report highlighted many positive features and these continue to be evident. The report recommended that members continue to strengthen self review and incorporate a more bicultural focus in programmes. Members have increased their understandings and capabilities in these areas.

This review was part of a cluster of nine Playcentre reviews in the Auckland Playcentre Association.

The Review Findings

Children benefit from opportunities to learn alongside trusted adults. They explore their interests in a safe and nurturing environment, where they are valued and respected. Children are supported by adults who are highly responsive to children’s verbal and non-verbal cues. Parents encourage their children to follow their preferences and make choices in their play. Children play well in a mixed-aged programme that supports friendships and independence. These aspects link to the Laingholm Playcentre philosophy.

Centre members plan programmes that respond to children’s individual interests and cater for different age groups. They provide well for infants and toddlers to support their exploration and sense of belonging. Effective planning provides clear direction to broaden children’s learning experiences.

Centre members reflect regularly on children’s successes and interests. They discuss ways to extend children’s learning. Adults use self review to guide improvements to the programme and practices in order to promote positive outcomes for all children. They attractively present individual records of children’s learning.

Te reo Māori is meaningfully integrated into the programme and the learning environment. A parent leads initiatives to include biculturalism in the programme and is supported by all centre members. ERO encourages the centre to continue to explore ways to strengthen their bicultural approaches.

Centre members have refined the Playcentre framework of policies and procedures to ensure they relate to this centre‘s context. They use systems well to guide centre operations. Sound self review provides a foundation for improvement.

All members are encouraged to take an active role in supporting centre practices. Office holders recognise the need to increase training levels to promote shared understandings and consistent practices. A paid educator is employed to extend children’s and adults’ learning.

The Association’s strategic plan provides a guide for governance and is regularly monitored. Management and governance processes are well established. The Association provides assistance for centres, and appropriate Playcentre training courses. It provides regular visits each term from a curriculum and programme supporter. Association office holders are highly committed to the Playcentre philosophy and to maintaining Playcentre as a valuable education option for parents/whānau.

Key Next Steps

Centre members identified key next steps that appropriately include:

  • improving assessment records to better show children’s learning progress over time
  • extending older children’s learning through more complex play
  • continuing to promote new leadership through modelling and in-centre support.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Laingholm Playcentre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Laingholm Playcentre will be in three years.

Dale Bailey Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

25 May 2015

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Laingholm, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

22024

Licence type

Playcentre

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

26 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Service roll

22

Gender composition

Girls 13

Boys 9

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

other

3

16

3

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:2

Better than minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:2

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

March 2015

Date of this report

25 May 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

May 2012

 

Education Review

January 2009

 

Education Review

November 2005

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.