Waimauku Playcentre

Education institution number:
22014
Service type:
Playcentre
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
27
Telephone:
Address:

69 Muriwai Road, Waimauku

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1. Evaluation of Waimauku Playcentre

How well placed is Waimauku Playcentre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Waimauku Playcentre is a family cooperative and is licensed for 30 children, including 15 up to the age of two years. It is a large spacious centre in a semi-rural setting and has operated for the past 40 years. The Playcentre philosophy of whānau and children learning together guides centre practices. Whānau value the way that Playcentre promotes social opportunities for children and families.

The centre is part of Te Akoranga Playcentre Association, which provides Playcentre’s adult education programme, frameworks of policies and procedures, and support personnel. The centre’s representatives at Association level support and guide the centre’s bicultural practices. Currently the national Playcentre organisation is in the process of a comprehensive restructure. This is likely to change the current structure of Te Akoranga Playcentre Association.

The centre provides a variety of session times in response to families’ preferences. The ‘Big Kids’ session is led by two paid supervisors and a parent. Other sessions are parent led. The centre is used for adult education sessions attended by trainees from across the Association. Recent self review has focused on and resulted in improvements to, the welcoming and settling in process for new families and on identifying new ideas for making the playcentre more manageable for busy families. A recent extension of the time allocated to the Big Kids sessions provides older children with a more indepth learning programme as they prepare to transition to school.

The 2012 ERO report noted many areas of good practice including a commitment to Playcentre training, and positive support for younger children. Since 2012 centre members have introduced sessions to specifically support younger children, and other sessions that focus on helping older children to prepare for school.

This review was part of a cluster of five playcentre reviews in the Te Akoranga Playcentre Association.

The Review Findings

The centre is welcoming and inclusive. Children, with their parents/whānau, enjoy a strong sense of belonging and wellbeing in the centre. They have continual opportunities to lead their own learning and are supported by responsive adults. Children confidently talk about their play interests. They play well together in mixed age groups and demonstrate tuakana/teina relationships, where older and younger children interact and support each other.

Since ERO’s 2012 report, members have worked hard to complete stage one of a comprehensive upgrade of the outdoor environment. The large spaces invite children to select from a wide range of indoor and outdoor learning experiences. Adults provide well for children’s creative, imaginative and physical play.

A broad selection of learning areas including science, music, family play and woodwork are available and easily accessed by children of all ages. The centre’s displays promote the value of te reo Māori, literacy and mathematics. There are well resourced areas for administration, equipment storage, and quieter spaces for children to explore and play in.

Parents/whānau work well together to gain consensus for all decision making around the programme and management of the centre. They understand the purpose of self review and actively participate in evaluating the quality of sessions and centre practices.

Parents/whānau are highly responsive to children’s interests, strengths and needs. They enjoy actively participating in their children’s learning experiences and recording these in individual learning portfolios.

Parents/whānau and children enthusiastically participate in te reo and tikanga Māori, including karakia and waiata. Māori whānau actively support other parents to promote a bicultural curriculum. They ensure that local hapū knowledge is shared and understood. Some share their skills with the Association.

The curriculum aligns Te Whāriki, the New Zealand early childhood curriculum, and Kei Tua O te Paei, the an early childhood assessment model. Adults regularly record observations of children’s learning. Programmes include trips and excursions. The end-of-session evaluations are well documented. They are used to inform future planning and extension activities relevant to children’s emerging interests.

The centre is well lead by a core of committed and long-serving parents and grandparents who provide role models for newer members and emerging leaders. The Association’s support has guided the centre’s strategic decisions. Centre members participate in a wide selection of learning opportunities available to them. Workshops have challenged and informed their theories of how children learn through play. Centre members use robust and consultative self-review processes to guide relevant changes.

Key Next Steps

The Association leaders and centre members agree that key next steps include:

  • building centre members’ knowledge about Auckland’s diverse cultures and increase their capacity to respond to this diversity
  • formalising a strategic plan that documents this centre’s strategic priorities as a guide for future centre members.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Waimauku Playcentre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Waimauku Playcentre will be in four years.

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

30 October 2015

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2. Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Waimauku, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

22014

Licence type

Playcentre

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

30 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Service roll

31

Gender composition

Girls 16

Boys 15

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

10

21

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:2

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

August 2015

Date of this report

30 October 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

October 2012

 

Education Review

September 2009

 

Education Review

March 2006

3. General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

 

Early Childhood Service Education Review Report: Waimauku Playcentre

Education reviews in early childhood services focus on the factors that contribute to positive outcomes for children. We work with early childhood services to identify their strengths and the areas they need to review and develop. Early childhood services take part in the review process and are expected to make use of the findings to enhance children's learning and wellbeing.

1. Evaluation of the Service

How well placed is the service to promote positive outcomes for children?

The Waimauku Playcentre is well placed to promote positive outcomes for children.

Context

Waimauku Playcentre is co-operatively managed by members who are the families of the children who are enrolled. It operates within the Te Akoranga Playcentre Association which provides support personnel, parent education, and a framework for centre management.

The centre currently runs four morning sessions per week, with an expectation that children will attend at least two of these sessions. Parents attend sessions with their children and complete management tasks to ensure the smooth running of the centre.

The Review Findings

The high ratio of adults to children ensures that there are many opportunities for children to be supported in their play. Members interact with their own children and with others, talking with them and helping them access resources.

Members recognise the value of allowing children to direct their own play and to develop independence. Older children are encouraged to plan activities and choose the resources that they will use. Children make decisions about their play in collaboration with other children and with adults.

Parents conduct significant self review and plan strategically to support ongoing improvement for the Playcentre. Self reviews follow a planned process that enables all parents to participate in decision making. The outcomes of changes made as a result of these reviews are evaluated and serve as a basis for ongoing improvement in the centre.

Since the 2009 ERO review, parents have made significant progress in improving their Playcentre qualifications. Many more now have Level 3 qualifications and so they are able to supervise sessions. Many parents have Level 2 qualifications and are on courses to gain Level 3.

A much higher percentage of families attend two sessions a week than was the case two years ago. The centre reports that this has resulted in increased contribution and commitment from parents, and happier and more settled children who are achieving better learning outcomes.

Members have also improved the provision for children less than two years of age. They have put strategies in place to support those who have young children with older siblings at the session. They continue to review how well the Playcentre provides for younger children and are planning sessions where the younger children are the focus. They are also planning sessions that focus on helping older children prepare for school.

Members are clear about their intended curriculum outcomes and plan the programme accordingly. Curriculum goals include developing resilience, self reliance, problem solving, empathy, and good social and communication skills.

Early literacy and numeracy skills and knowledge are supported within the programme. Parents share books with children and there are opportunities for children to write. The centre programme is enhanced by visitors and visits within and beyond the Waimauku community.

Each morning session is evaluated at its conclusion. Part of this evaluation identifies the learning that took place for individuals and groups. The effectiveness of activities is considered and planning for future sessions is discussed. These evaluations help to ensure continuity between sessions.

The centre is well supported to promote success for Māori children and to develop bicultural awareness for all children. Two Māori members are sharing their knowledge and ideas with other parents and the wider Te Akoranga Association. Tikanga Māori relevant to the centre has been identified and is being documented. Te reo Māori is visible in the centre and some is used when talking with children. Whānau report that they feel welcome, included, and empowered to support the development of the centre.

The Playcentre has made many improvements over the last two years. The challenge now is to ensure that the good practices now in place are sustained over time. The centre is well placed to meet the challenge.

2. Legal Requirements

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Waimauku Playcentre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

 

3. Next Review

When is ERO likely to review the early childhood service again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

 

Violet Tu'uga Stevenson

National Manager Review Services Northern Region (Acting)

29 October 2012

Information about the Early Childhood Service

 

Location

Waimauku, Rodney District

Ministry of Education profile number

22014

Licence type

Sessional Playcentre

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

30 children, including up to 15 aged under 2 years

Service roll

48

Gender composition

Boys 30 Girls 18

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Asian

38

9

1

Review team on site

August 2012

Date of this report

29 October 2012

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Accountability Review

September 2009

March 2006

July 2002

General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

About ERO Reviews

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the New Zealand government department that reviews schools and early childhood services throughout New Zealand.

Review focus

ERO's education reviews in early childhood services focus on the factors that contribute to positive learning outcomes for children. ERO evaluates how well placed the service is to make and sustain improvements for the benefit of all children at the service. To reach these findings ERO considers:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of self review and partnerships with parents and whānau.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews do not cover every aspect of service performance and each ERO report may cover different issues. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

Disclaimer

Individual ERO school and early childhood service reports are public information and may be copied or sent electronically. However, the Education Review Office can guarantee only the authenticity of original documents which have been obtained in hard copy directly from either the local ERO office or ERO National Office in Wellington.