Kaimata School

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Education institution number:
2178
School type:
Full Primary
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
91
Telephone:
Address:

715 Tarata Road, Inglewood

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School Context

Kaimata School is a community-focused, rural school near Inglewood, catering for students in Years 1 to 8. The roll currently stands at 108 students and 19 identify as Māori or Samoan. The roll has continued to increase since the May 2017 ERO report. An enrolment scheme was put in place in 2017 to restrict the numbers of students attending. A new assistant principal was appointed February 2018.

The school’s R.I.S.E. (Respect-Integrity-Self Esteem-Excellence) values and vision, recently reviewed in consultation with parents and the community, set clear direction for learning. Trustees, leaders and school staff seek to support students to be highly engaged, confident learners who demonstrate these values and dispositions.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • wellbeing and behaviour

  • achievement in reading, writing and mathematics.

Professional development has focused on building teachers’ cultural competence and capability in te reo me ngā tikanga Māori and effective teaching in mathematics. The school is a part of the Inglewood Kāhui Ako that has set its focus and achievement challenges. The principal is currently the Kāhui Ako leader.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

Analysed achievement data for 2014 to 2016 for reading, writing and mathematics shows some disparity in achievement between boys and girls, with boys achieving less well than girls. As yet there is no consistent pattern of improved equity overtime. In 2017, almost all students achieved at expectations in reading, writing and mathematics, with a number achieving above age expectations. Pacific students’ achievement closely replicates that of other students.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

Acceleration of achievement is evident for many students, including Māori, in the 2017 data. This trend is apparent in the achievement of many students in the past three years. Although Māori students are succeeding the school has recognised that there is a need to continue to focus on accelerating their achievement in 2018. The school is currently focused on accelerating achievement of all students to a level that is above age expectation.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Trustees have a relentless focus on positive academic and wellbeing outcomes for all students. They are highly collaborative and strongly supportive of students, school leaders and the community. Their strategic and deliberate decision making, together with considered resourcing of planned changes and improvements, supports the enactment of the school vision and positive outcomes for all students.

Leaders demonstrate a strong sense of direction. They implement change in a planned and considered manner. A commitment to positive development of the whole child is apparent. They ensure that school practices and processes are responsive to, and promote, student wellbeing and engagement in learning. Strong, distributed leadership, based on relational trust, is highly evident.

Leaders continue to implement effective practices and processes to promote equity of outcomes for all learners. There is well considered, useful tracking of student achievement for both individuals and groups. Leaders set useful targets and identify deliberate actions, such as additional staffing, and appropriately focused strategic goals that sustain ongoing improvement to student outcomes. Further strengthening the analysis of achievement data to identify and address disparity, particularly for Māori is a next step.

A strong commitment to the integration of tikanga Māori is evident throughout school operations. Developing an understanding of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori is prioritised for teachers and students. A collaborative partnership with local iwi, Ngāti Maru, also supports students and teachers to grow their understanding of te ao Māori and use of te reo Māori.

Students are engaged in their learning. They experience a curriculum that is responsive, localised and personalised to incorporate their personal preferences and interests. There is a deliberate scaffolding of self-management skills that supports students to become independent learners. A range of useful opportunities empower students to build and strengthen their leadership skills.

Students with additional needs are well supported by teachers and their classmates to participate in all aspects of school life. Staff work collaboratively with parents and specialist staff to provide the assistance these students require.

A strong focus on developing learning partnerships with parents and whānau to support students is evident. Parents, whānau and community aspirations for students are well considered and acted on. The findings of surveys impacts on decision making and affirms the school values.

A strategic and coherent approach to building professional capability and collective capacity of staff and trustees is highly evident. The strengths of individual trustees and staff members are recognised, valued and used. As a result of research and internal review there is a carefully fostered, collective approach to ongoing strengthening and sharing of effective teacher practice. This is evident in the classrooms and leads to positive outcomes for students. A distributed leadership model effectively builds the capacity of teachers as leaders.

Leaders have a systematic approach to internal evaluation. They use a range of evidence to identify areas for improvement that support student learning and wellbeing. They put in place new initiatives to address the identified areas. They identify actions that have been effective and possible next steps for further improvement. Leaders have identified ‘ako’ as a focus in 2018. This is seen as key to raising overall student achievement and ongoing improvements in teacher practice. They continue to investigate this and the implications it has for the school curriculum.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

There is ongoing development of a localised, responsive, personalised Kaimata School Curriculum that reflects te ao Māori, te ao Pākehā and the rural community. Strong relationships and the acknowledgement of the place of culture and local history are recognised as an important component of this curriculum. An agreed next step is to continue to document changes to the school’s curriculum to guide expectations of teachers, delivery of the curriculum and inform contexts for learning.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • leadership and stewardship that focus on positive academic and wellbeing outcomes for all students

  • a personalised curriculum that maximises student interests and opportunities for learning

  • partnerships with local iwi, community and families that support positive outcomes for students

  • well established school values that underpin school expectations and operation.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • continuing to review and document curriculum guidelines to inform and guide staff

  • strengthen the analysis of student achievement data to identify and reduce disparity.

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in three years.

Patricia Davey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

16 May 2018

About the school

Location

Inglewood, Taranaki

Ministry of Education profile number

2178

School type

Full primary, Year 1 - 8

School roll

108

Gender composition

Female 52%, Male 48%

Ethnic composition

Pākehā 82%
Māori 16%
Samoan 2%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

March 2018

Date of this report

16 May 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review            May 2015
Supplementary Review    May 2012
Education Review            February 2011

Findings

Students experience a broad curriculum. Commitment to promoting te reo me ngā tikanga Māori is evident. Most students achieve very well in relation to National Standards. Warm relationships support partnerships for learning. Areas for ongoing development include curriculum documentation and embedding effective teaching practices. School leaders and teachers focus on raising student achievement.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Kaimata School is a community-focused, rural school catering for students in Year 1 to 8. Since the May 2012 ERO review the roll has increased and in 2013 a new principal appointed. The school’s leadership structure was revised during 2014 with a new senior leadership team now in place.

Trustees, leaders and teachers are strongly committed to supporting students to be highly engaged, confident learners and achievers who are empowered to achieve to their potential. Students with special needs are well integrated into school life and individually supported to achieve.

All staff are involved in regular professional learning and development (PLD).

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school continues to develop its use of student achievement information to improve outcomes for students. Data is used effectively to: 

  • inform teaching and learning programmes
  • identify students at risk of underachieving
  • report to the board of trustees
  • set school targets. 

Assessment processes and data analysis has been refined through PLD in mathematics and self review. The principal and senior leaders have identified, and ERO agrees, that a next step is to establish schoolwide systems for gathering valid and reliable data overtime to:

  • track and monitor the progress of individual and groups of students
  • strengthen the reliability of the information gathered through deeper analysis of data to identify trends and patterns.

School achievement data shows that most students achieve well in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics, with a high number of students achieving above these standards. From this information senior leaders have set expectations for raising achievement in mathematics and achievement of boys as targets for 2015.

Parents receive good and timely information their child’s learning in relation to National Standards. They have regular opportunities to discuss current learning priorities with the student and their teacher. These provide opportunities for evidence-based discussions and goal setting.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The Kaimata School curriculum is effective in engaging students in school life. Students participate confidently in learning activities and are developing the ability to self assess their work. They expressed enjoyment of school.

An enriched curriculum reflects the rural nature of the school and its community. Extensive work on revising the curriculum, including community views has resulted in the development of the RISERespect-Integrity-Self Esteem-Excellence, values and vision. These set clear direction for learning. A next step is to strengthen documentation through capturing recent developments, inclusion of guidelines for teachers on assessment as related to National Standards and expectations for classroom practices.

The school works closely with its community to develop and deliver aspects of the curriculum. Open communication and a family-friendly environment contribute to warm relationships and learning partnerships.

Students are well engaged in classroom activities. They are confident, articulate and express an enjoyment of school. They interact well with each other both in the classroom and playground. Senior students experience a range of opportunities to grow and demonstrate their leadership skills.

Teachers articulate high expectations for students’ learning. They build on students’ prior knowledge and adapt their teaching to meet needs. Teachers are active participants in useful, relevant professional learning that results in improved understandings and changes in teaching practice.

Examples of effective teaching practice are evident. Teachers know students well and have established a collective responsibility for the achievement of all students. They make good use of student achievement information to identify the needs of their students and plan programmes to meet these needs.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

School leaders recognise that this is an area of ongoing development. Te ao Māori practices have been embraced. There has been considerable work done to strengthen te reo me ngā tikanga Māori across the school. This includes:

 

  • the establishment of an active whānau support group
  • development of relationships with the local marae
  • employment of expertise to support and deliver aspects of related classroom programmes and to support the further development of the school’s kapa haka
  • students and teachers learning alongside each other.

 

These steps have resulted in the development of a school waiata, inclusion of te ao Māori across the curriculum and increased opportunities for Māori students to take leadership roles.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

Kaimata School is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

Trustees are committed to, and focused on, improving outcomes for students. They are aware of their roles and responsibilities for governance and the promotion of student achievement. They receive useful information to inform their understanding of curriculum, programmes and student achievement. Multiple perspectives are considered in their decision-making. There is regular communication and consultation with the school community on aspects of school operations.

The principal provides strong leadership and guidance. He sets high expectations and has a collegial leadership style. He continues to work on: 

  • actively promoting a clear vision for school development
  • growing the leadership capacity of teachers
  • positive and strategic management of changes within the school. 

Processes have been established to monitor and develop teachers’ practice. Teachers have begun to inquire into their practice and their impact on students’ learning. A recently improved appraisal process should also contribute to strengthening classroom teaching. An agreed next step is to continue to develop and embed effective teaching practices.

Self-review processes are developing well and result in improvements. Additional resourcing by trustees supports the achievement of students. A next step is to use the self-review processes to investigate the effectiveness of these school-funded initiatives.

Student success is celebrated and shared. Positive and supportive relationships are evident amongst students, between teachers and students, and between the school and its community. Interactions between school members are learning-focused.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to: 

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management. 

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance. 

Conclusion

Students experience a broad curriculum. Commitment to promoting te reo me ngā tikanga Māori is evident. Most students achieve very well in relation to National Standards. Warm relationships support partnerships for learning. Areas for ongoing development include curriculum documentation and embedding effective teaching practices. School leaders and teachers focus on raising student achievement.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

8 May 2015

About the School

Location

Inglewood, Taranaki

Ministry of Education profile number

2178

School type

Full Primary (Year 1 to 8)

School roll

93

Gender composition

Female 48, Male 45

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

14

79

Review team on site

March 2015

Date of this report

8 May 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Supplementary Review

Education Review

Education Review

May 2012

February 2011

May 2007