Collectively Kids Ltd

Education institution number:
20478
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
41
Telephone:
Address:

28 Carrington Road, Mount Albert, Auckland

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1 Evaluation of Collectively Kids Ltd

How well placed is Collectively Kids Ltd to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Collectively Kids Ltd is very well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Collectively Kids Ltd is a well-established centre in Mount Albert. It is licensed to provide education and care for 30 children, including up to 10 under the age of two years. There are separate indoor and outdoor play spaces for the two age groups. An emphasis on children of all ages learning with and from each other, means that there are regular opportunities for them to mingle.

The centre has remained in the same ownership since it was established. The owner, team leader and head teacher work collaboratively to lead the centre. All teachers hold current practising certificates. An additional staff member supports teachers in working with children with additional learning needs.

The centre's vision, philosophy and goals are well articulated. An emphasis on environmental education, social justice and the bicultural heritage of Aotearoa New Zealand underpins the play-based curriculum.

The 2015 ERO report noted very positive relationships and high levels of communication between children, parents and staff. Interactions were consistent and focused on children's wellbeing and learning. These positive features of the centre continue to be apparent. The 2015 report identified that teachers' next step was to continue increasing their focus in assessment portfolios on individual children's learning. Very good progress has been made in this regard.

The Review Findings

Children confidently lead their own learning in a well-resourced and presented environment. They make choices about what they want to do and who they will play with. They demonstrate care for each other and are keen to help. Children learn to take responsibility for themselves and have opportunities to be leaders. They are very well supported to develop social skills and to regulate their own behaviour and emotions. Children under the age of two receive very good quality care.

Teachers are skilled in the ways they work with children. They know children and their families well and consistently promote children's wellbeing and learning. They often read to children and provide very good support for language development. Teachers are inclusive and responsive to children's individual needs and preferences, and respect all children as competent and capable learners. Their interactions are underpinned by the concept of ako. Teachers and children learn from and with each other. There is evidence of children participating in tuakana/teina relationships. Parents and whānau are seen as an integral part of their children's learning.

The curriculum is well developed and reflects the centre's vision and philosophy. Priorities for children's learning are well articulated and observable in practice. Children have very good opportunities to contribute to caring for their local environment and to learn about global issues of sustainability. They experience an environment where te reo and tikanga Māori are interwoven in interactions, routines, rituals and documentation. Children learn about diversity, and consideration of others is fostered. Parents who spoke to ERO expressed their appreciation of what the centre offers their children.

Teachers implement effective planning and assessment processes. Records of children's learning are highly individualised. Parents are invited to contribute to the planning for their children. Parent aspirations are incorporated into children's individual learning goals. Very good provision for non-contact time enables teachers to plan for and record children's learning within the framework of Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum.

Curriculum projects and annual cultural events ensure that children benefit from rich and varied learning experiences. Centre leaders are now focusing on how they can strengthen the evaluation of curriculum plans to better evidence positive outcomes for children.

Centre operations are supported by well-established systems and processes. A comprehensive strategic plan guides centre development. Internal evaluation and teacher appraisal promote critical inquiry and help sustain continuous improvement. The owner encourages distributed leadership, and good use is made of mentors to strengthen professional practice. The current review of centre policies and procedures will help to enhance these sound foundations.

Key Next Steps

Centre leaders have identified appropriate key next steps for centre development, including:

  • continuing to strengthen the evaluation of curriculum planning

  • further developing the visual arts within the curriculum.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Collectively Kids Ltd completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Steve Tanner

Director Review and Improvement Services Northern

Northern Region

4 June 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Mount Albert, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

20478

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

30 children, including up to 10 aged under 2

Service roll

38

Gender composition

Boys 21 Girls 17

Ethnic composition

Māori
NZ European/Pākehā
Chinese
other ethnic groups

1
25
4
8

Percentage of qualified teachers

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:5

Meets minimum requirements

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

April 2019

Date of this report

4 June 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

July 2015

Education Review

August 2012

Education Review

June 2009

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Collectively Kids Ltd

How well placed is Collectively Kids Ltd to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Collectively Kids Ltd is licensed to provide education and care for 30 children, including 10 up to two years of age. The majority of children are NZ European/Pākehā. Eight Māori children and a small number from Samoan, Indian, Chinese, French, Russian and Irish backgrounds also attend. Teachers are ethnically diverse and are qualified and registered.

The service is well established. The owner provides a home-like service with well designed learning environments. Teachers maintain very positive relationships and there are high levels of communication between children, parents and centre staff. Interactions are consistent and focused on children's wellbeing and learning. The service has a strong focus on natural science, environmental responsibility and sustainable practices. Centre strategic plans show a focus on refining teaching and learning systems to increase the effectiveness of practice.

The 2012 ERO report noted the many positive practices that supported children’s all round development. These included high quality education and care practices, and skilful support to promote learning through play and to help children develop appropriate social relationships.

ERO also recommended staff improve planning documentation by strengthening links between centre documents and curriculum goals. It noted that self review could be further improved by more systematically collecting evaluated reflections and feedback to use in reviews. This report notes continued development in these areas, with teachers continuing to work collaboratively on developing planning, assessment and management documentation.

The Review Findings

Children are supported to become confident, articulate and socially adept. They are comfortable in their learning environment and are accepting of others. They enjoy a good sense of belonging and wellbeing and have strong relationships with caring teachers. Children’s positive attitudes to learning are evident. Older children display regard for the welfare of younger children. Children are self managing and take responsibility for the care of their learning environment. Teachers are aware of children’s individual rhythms for learning and work at the child’s pace.

Parents of children with diverse learning needs are enthusiastic about the inclusive and caring approach that teachers display when working with children. Families feel well supported.

The programme is stimulating and extends children’s learning. Opportunities are provided for mixed age play where older children support younger children. Children are actively supported by teachers to negotiate solutions to problems with their peers. Mathematics, literacy and science learning are evident in children’s individual portfolios. Children enjoy excursions into the local community where they learn about sustainable natural environments. Teachers and children explore topics and learn together.

The bicultural development of the centre has good foundations and continues to strengthen. Tikanga is being developed further and deeper connections are being established with the local Māori community. Children enjoy learning their mihi, engaging in powhiri, listening to traditional stories and singing waiata.

A broader understanding of the cultures of whānau continues to develop. Teachers survey parents to ask how they can further support children's home cultures. Staff come from a range of ethnic backgrounds and share aspects of their cultures in the programme. Parents also share their cultural knowledge and valued taonga/art pieces with the centre.

The centre owner is a leader in the centre. She is developing shared leadership roles amongst staff. Teachers have many opportunities to lead projects based on their interests and strengths. These reciprocal and respectful approaches underpin the positive relationships evident between staff.

Trusting relationships and learning partnerships have been established between parents and teachers. Partnerships have been developed particularly well with parents and whānau of children with special learning needs. Information is shared between the home, centre and support organisations. This means that children can receive high quality support. Parents appreciate the centre’s inclusive and welcoming environment where their children are valued and extended through learning experiences.

Key Next Steps

ERO and the owner/manager agree that teachers should continue to increase the extent to which there is a focus on individual children’s ongoing learning in their portfolios.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Collectively Kids Ltd completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

The owner and staff have recently shared and reviewed processes for maintaining the private and secure storage of children’s personal information.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Collectively Kids Ltd will be in three years.

Dianne Moffitt

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

16 July 2015

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Mt Albert, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

20478

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

30 children, including up to 10 aged under 2

Service roll

46

Gender composition

Girls 23

Boys 23

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Chinese

French

Russian

Samoan

Chinese/Māori

Irish

Samoan/Cook Island Maori

8

27

2

2

2

2

1

1

1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:5

Meets minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

April 2015

Date of this report

16 July 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

August 2012

 

Education Review

June 2009

 

Education Review

September 2005

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.