Te Miro School

Education institution number:
2012
School type:
Full Primary
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
50
Telephone:
Address:

443 Te Miro Road, Te Miro, Cambridge

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Te Miro School

Te Ara Huarau | School Profile Report

Background

This Profile Report was written within 8 months of the Education Review Office and Te Miro School working in Te Ara Huarau, an improvement evaluation approach used in most English Medium State and State Integrated Schools. For more information about Te Ara Huarau see ERO’s website. www.ero.govt.nz

Context

Te Miro School is situated in a small village farming community 13kms from Cambridge. It offers education for students in Years 1 to 8, and promotes the vision of growing our future, nurturing confidence and respect.

Te Miro School’s strategic priorities for improving outcomes for learners are:

  • growing a great team of teaching and learning

  • an environment that embeds ‘our rich local curriculum’.

You can find a copy of the school’s strategic and annual plan on Te Miro School’s website.

ERO and the school are working together to evaluate how effectively student achievement data is being used to inform teaching and learning programmes to improve student outcomes.

The rationale for selecting this evaluation is:

  • that it aligns with the strategic initiatives of the school

  • it supports strengthening of communication of student progress and achievement with parents and whānau

  • to recognise students’ strengths and needs so that they experience success.

The school expects to see partnerships between school and whānau that are focused on the learner, a wide range of student achievement data being used to inform teaching and learning programmes, and students experiencing success across a range of curriculum areas.

Strengths

The school can draw from the following strengths to support its goal to effectively use data to improve student outcomes:

  • A collaborative and experienced teaching team.

  • Authentic learning opportunities within the natural environment of the local area.

  • Well-established partnerships that support the strategic direction of the school.

Where to next?

Moving forward, the school will prioritise:

  • investigating and deciding which data will be collected and why

  • reviewing when and how to report to parents and whānau about student progress and achievement

  • monitoring data to identify the impact of teaching and learning programmes on student progress and achievement.

ERO’s role will be to support the school in its evaluation for improvement cycle to improve outcomes for all learners. ERO will support the school in reporting their progress to the community. The next public report on ERO’s website will be a Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report and is due within three years.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

17 May 2023 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement.  educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Te Miro School

Board Assurance with Regulatory and Legislative Requirements Report 2023 to 2026

As of February 2023, the Te Miro School Board has attested to the following regulatory and legislative requirements:

Board Administration

Yes

Curriculum

Yes

Management of Health, Safety and Welfare

Yes

Personnel Management

Yes

Finance

Yes

Assets

Yes

Actions for Compliance

ERO and the board have identified the following areas of non-compliance during the board assurance process:

  • Maintaining an on-going programme of self-review in relation to policies, plans and programmes.

The board has since addressed the areas of non-compliance identified.

Further Information

For further information please contact Te Miro School, School Board.

The next School Board assurance that it is meeting regulatory and legislative requirements will be reported, along with the Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report, within three years.

Information on ERO’s role and process in this review can be found on the Education Review Office website.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

17 May 2023

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Te Miro School - 19/12/2017

School Context

Te Miro is a small, full primary school set in rural farmland in the Waikato. The current roll of 42 includes three Māori students. The school operates two composite classrooms.

A new principal was appointed in 2015 and classroom teachers have remained the same. A new principal and class teacher have been appointed to take up their positions in 2018.

The school states that they aim to support all learners to be self-regulating, curious, creative and innovative, actively participating in and contributing to society. The values of respect, responsibility, excellence and innovation are given priority. Current aims and goals are to embed these values in the curriculum, strengthen learner agency, meet the needs of all learners and reflect pride in being bi-cultural New Zealanders. There are clear, specific targets and improvement plans to accelerate the progress of all learners at risk of not achieving in reading, writing and mathematics.

Teachers have participated in professional development related to literacy, mathematics, Māori perspectives and boys’ learning.

The school is a member of the Cambridge Kāhui Ako|Community of Learning, Te Puna o Kemureti.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, school-wide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • achievement in reading and writing and mathematics in relation to the National Standards

  • students with additional learning needs and case studies about their progress

  • health and safety

  • pastoral care and guidance.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for students. Data shows these outcomes have been sustained over a period of time. The school’s National Standards data from 2014-2016 shows most students are achieving at or above the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Māori students achieve at similar levels to non-Māori. Boys and girls achieve at similar levels. School information shows that the numbers of students achieving at or above in literacy and mathematics is increasing.

1.2 How effectively does this school respond to those Māori and other students whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is responding effectively to those Māori and other students whose learning and achievement need accelerating. Data gathered since 2014 shows there is no disparity for groups of learners in the school. The school can show accelerated learning for most at-risk learners in reading and mathematics in 2017. Data shows that some children made accelerated progress in writing.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Teaching practice is effective in enabling the achievement of equity and excellence. Targeted professional development for teachers since 2014 has focused on positively managing student behaviour, assessment, accelerating mathematics and literacy learning and teachers inquiring into the effectiveness of their teaching. This targeted approach has strengthened teacher capability and resulted in improving outcomes for students at risk of not achieving. Students know their goals and next steps for learning. Teachers consistently use strategies that support students to manage aspects of their own learning, make connections to prior learning, and reflect with their teachers and peers about learning. They plan specifically to accelerate the progress of at-risk learners. Indoor environments are well resourced and attractively presented.

The responsive curriculum is well designed to enable students to experience success in a wide variety of learning experiences. There are documented, clear and consistently implemented expectations for teaching and learning. Students with special learning needs and abilities, including gifted and talented learners, receive appropriate classroom programmes and specialist support. The interests and aspirations of students and their families and whānau are known and evident in the curriculum. There are many opportunities for students to explore learning in authentic contexts, develop their leadership and participate in sporting, creative and cultural events. Māori students are affirmed in their culture. All students have opportunities to increase their understanding and identity as bi-cultural New Zealanders. There is a positive, safe and inclusive culture for learning. The spacious outdoor environment provides many opportunities for students to engage in safe risk taking, adventuring and learning about sustainability in the natural world. Information gathered by the school shows that these approaches have resulted in increased engagement, particularly for boys.

Parents and whānau are well informed and authentically engaged as partners in their children’s learning. They make a significant contribution to the life of the school, including contributing their skills and knowledge to enrich the curriculum. The school regularly consults with the community to gather feedback and report on outcomes. Parents and whānau benefit from inclusive and supportive relationships.

Professional leadership is highly collaborative and focused on building teacher capability. Systems and processes for internal evaluation and sustainability are well embedded and contribute to ongoing school improvement and development. Teachers receive constructive feedback through rigorous appraisals. They inquire into the effectiveness of their practice with a focus on improving outcomes for all students. Professional learning and development is well aligned to the identified needs of students and teachers. Leaders and teachers make highly effective use of student achievement information at all levels. These good practices are contributing to higher levels of student achievement.

The board is providing effective governance. Trustees have participated in ongoing training for their roles and responsibilities. They access external advice and guidance when appropriate. The board sets clear expectations for reporting and receives regular and accurate information from the principal about progress towards meeting strategic aims and targets. Decision-making is focused on accelerating the learning of at-risk students and positive outcomes for all.

Since the 2014 ERO report the school has effectively addressed the areas for improvement related to evaluating and reporting on outcomes for students at risk of not achieving, improving students’ social skills, strengthening teaching practice and the use of student achievement information to support students in their learning. There have been significant upgrades to the indoor and outdoor environments and play areas.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence?

Further development of the curriculum is needed in the following areas:

  • implementing the careers education programme for Years 7 and 8

  • further integration of the interests and strengths of students

  • strategically implementing the learning languages curriculum to enable students to make progress with their fluency in te reo Māori.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • internal evaluation practices that lead to school development and improvement

  • a culture for learning that is respectful and inclusive

  • a curriculum that is learner-centred and responsive

  • collaborative leadership that builds capability in teaching and assessment

  • well informed governance that provides clear strategic direction

  • meaningful partnerships for learning with parents and the wider community.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, it will be important to effectively manage changes to leadership and teaching in 2018 to ensure sustainability of learner success.

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in three years.

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer

Te Tai Miringa - Waikato / Bay of Plenty Region

19 December 2017

About the school

Location

near Cambridge

Ministry of Education profile number

2012

School type

Full Primary

School roll

42

Gender composition

Girls 23 Boys 19

Ethnic composition

Māori 3
Pākehā 36
Other European 3

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

November 2017

Date of this report

19 December 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review September 2014
Education Review November 2011
Education Review November 2008

Te Miro School - 19/09/2014

Findings

Te Miro is a small rural full primary school which enjoys strong community support. Students benefit from the range of opportunities offered, and attractive learning environments. The principal and staff work together to build teaching practice and strengthen links with the Māori community. Trustees respond to parent aspirations.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Te Miro School is a full primary school set in attractive farmland and bush areas in the hills north of Cambridge. The current student roll is 36, of whom 8 identify as Māori. The school operates two multi-level classrooms.

There have been significant changes at the school since the previous ERO report in 2011. A new principal took up her position at the start of 2012. The two main classroom teachers are also recently appointed. In addition, the attached Montessori class unit closed resulting in a considerable decrease in the total school roll. The board elected in 2013 is composed of trustees all new to their role.

After community consultation in 2012 and 2013, the charter was reviewed and the principal developed a detailed strategic plan. The stated mission for the school is to work ‘in partnership with our community, to inspire, challenge and empower learners’.

The board and principal responded positively to recommendations in the 2011 ERO report. The school is now meeting its legislative requirements, and governance roles are well defined. Extensive documented guidelines have been developed for curriculum delivery, especially in literacy and mathematics. Student achievement levels have improved, and the use of assessment information across the school has been strengthened.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The teachers and principal use appropriate standardised assessment tools to gather and analyse an extensive range of information on student achievement. This information is used effectively to promote positive educational outcomes for students.

Teachers identify students’ interests, strengths and learning needs and plan for the range of ages and learning levels in their classes. They involve students and their parents/whānau in setting personal and academic goals. Increasingly, students are leading report meetings between the classroom teacher and their parents. In addition to six-monthly written reports, teachers complete a review of student engagement and progress in their class each term. This review guides planning for the following weeks. The principal aggregates and interprets student achievement information at a school-wide level, to identify trends and patterns. She reports to the board on progress towards charter targets, and advises on additional resource allocations that may be appropriate to support learning.

School data at the end of 2013 indicates that the proportion of students achieving at or above the appropriate National Standard levels in reading, writing and mathematics is now comparable to regional and national expected levels. Student achievement levels in writing have increased significantly since 2012. Māori student achievement is similar to non-Māori in the school.

Students at risk of not achieving to expected levels are effectively identified. They are well supported by classroom teachers, learning assistants and the principal, who implement programmes and interventions. A next step for the school is to evaluate the outcomes of these interventions and report the progress made by the students involved.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum provides students with a broad range of academic, cultural, sporting and social learning experiences. The programme the school is able to offer benefits from the strong intergenerational support provided by families and the local community. Students are involved in traditional rural school activities, and have access to the sizeable swimming pool and an adjacent hall, which provide the venue for many events. The extensive school grounds and local native bush areas support the enviro-school programme. Students run the school radio station each day.

Teachers and students know each other well, and positive behaviour is promoted through professional development and the school values of ‘excellence, respect, responsibility and innovation’. Students have many opportunities to take responsibility for aspects of school organisation, and to take ‘safe risks’ in the attractive play areas. However, there remains a need to ensure higher levels of considerate and respectful student behaviour, as part of a community agreed focus on improving students’ social skills.

At the start of 2014, both classroom teachers were participating in an appropriate advice and guidance programme for beginning teachers. They work collaboratively with each other and the principal, as they share planning, student assessment information and successful classroom strategies. Professional development in 2014 has focused on the teaching of writing, science and the incorporation of te reo and tikanga Māori. The school recognises that an important next step is to continue the consolidation of teaching practice to strengthen the effective use of achievement information, and the empowerment of students in their own learning.

The principal provides well-informed educational leadership for staff and the community. She has strengthened the staff performance management system, the management of assessment and led professional information meetings for staff and the community. A ‘nuts and bolts’ manual has been developed that details key aspects of school organisation. While the principal has proposed innovative learning approaches for the school, with staff changes and other factors, limited progress on implementation has occurred.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The principal and staff have made a conscious and sustained effort to promote educational success for Māori, as Māori. They have sought to build relationships with the local iwi, and all students participated in a marae stay. Staff participate in externally facilitated te reo Māori professional programme, and are seeking to strengthen culturally responsive teaching practices in the classroom.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The following factors contribute to the school being well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

  • Trustees bring a broad range of strengths to their governance roles. They participate in training, and seek external advice and guidance as and when needed.
  • The principal provides effective reports to the board to inform decision making and target setting.
  • Learning environments that are well-resourced.
  • The support of the local community is ongoing.
  • There is regular review of policies and procedures, and annual community surveys.

The board, principal and ERO agree on the need to strengthen the shared commitment of students, staff, parents and community for the future positive direction for the school, and addressing the matters raised in this report.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Te Miro is a small rural full primary school which enjoys strong community support. Students benefit from the range of opportunities offered, and attractive learning environments. The principal and staff work together to build teaching practice and strengthen links with the Māori community. Trustees respond to parent aspirations.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

19 September 2014

About the School

Location

North of Cambridge

Ministry of Education profile number

2012

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

36

Gender composition

Boys 19 Girls 17

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Other European

24

8

4

Review team on site

July 2014

Date of this report

19 September 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

November 2011

November 2008

February 2006