Tauranga Intermediate

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Summary

Tauranga Intermediate is a large urban intermediate school catering for Year 7 and 8 students from the wider Tauranga Moana region. The current roll of 1280, includes approximately 40% Māori, 3% Pacific and 28 international students. Over the last three years, considerable progress has been made in the development of Te Whānau o te Maro unit, which currently provides bilingual and Māori immersion education for 134 students.

The school has had long-term involvement with the Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L) project and in 2016 undertook the Restorative Practices contract facilitated by the Ministry of Education. This process has contributed significantly to the current school-wide Positive Culture for Learning (PC4L). The PC4L has includes the integration of systems that support student learning and wellbeing. This integration has contributed to a collaborative and coordinated approach to achieving the school mission of ‘Exploring Personal Potential’. The school is a member of the Tauranga Peninsula Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako, alongside 10 local schools. Tauranga Intermediate achievement priorities and targets to accelerate progress for Māori are fully aligned with those of the Kāhui Ako.

Trustees are very experienced in their roles. The principal continues to provide strong leadership and direction, and there have been some changes to the senior leadership team.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school is responding well to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement needs acceleration.

Many school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence. These processes are closely linked to:

  • governance
  • leadership, including leadership for learning
  • curriculum design and enactment
  • pastoral care
  • internal evaluation.

Further development is needed to:

  • embed processes to that promote student knowledge of their learning, particularly of their next steps
  • develop an approach to school-wide target setting that includes all students whose learning is at risk.

At the time of this ERO review school-wide data shows that in 2016 the majority of students achieved the National Standard in writing, slightly more in mathematics and three quarters in reading. This data indicates that Māori and Pacific students did not achieve as well as other students in the school and that this pattern of disparity has been evident over the last three years. Achievement information for students in Te Whānau Maro, operating at Level 1 and 2 immersion, shows that students achieved across the range of expected levels in kōrero, pānui, tuhituhi, and pāngarau. The 2016 data also shows that girls achieved at higher rates than boys.

Since the last ERO review, the school has adopted a more effective targeted approach to reducing disparity, with significant accelerated progress evident for targeted Māori students.

Children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

Agreed next steps are to:

  • review the approach to setting annual targets and providing targeted action to focus more clearly on all students whose learning is at risk

  • embedding processes to promote student ownership of their learning progress, and understanding of their learning journey.

In addition, in Te Whānau o te Te Maro, consideration should be given to:

  • continuing to explore resources that enable kaiako to monitor students’ progress and make increasingly dependable judgements about student achievement in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga

  • further developing the school’s local curriculum in response to Te Marautanga o Aotearoa. 

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is responding well to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement needs acceleration.

Data gathered by the school shows that in 2016 the majority of students achieved the National Standard in writing, slightly more in mathematics and three quarters in reading. This school-wide data shows that Māori and Pacific students did not achieve as well as other groups of students in the school. The school has responded to this pattern of disparity by setting and closely monitoring targets to specifically focus on accelerating progress for Māori students who are not on track to meet the National Standard by the end of the year.

Achievement information for the 68 students in Te Whānau Maro, operating at Level 1 and 2 immersion, is gathered using Ngā Whanaketanga Rūmaki Māori. This data shows that in 2016 students achieved across the range of expected levels in kōrero, pānui, tuhituhi, and pangarau. The data also indicates that girls achieved at higher rates than boys. The school has responded to this disparity through providing teachers with sustained appropriate professional development.

Data is collected and analysed throughout the year about the rates of progress for all students and for targeted groups of students. This data shows that for the cohort of students entering the school in 2015, the overall rates of progress in reading, writing and mathematics have increased. Rates of acceleration for Māori have been slightly higher than for other students in the school. However, there remains disparity for Māori and Pacific learners. Data for the 123 Māori learners included in a school-wide target group shows that a large majority of these students made significant accelerated progress as a result of school-wide targeted action.

Along with improving outcomes for learners, an additional priority and valued outcome for the school is to build students’ and teachers’ capacity as 21st century digital citizens. The externally facilitated ‘Towards Transformation’ project is focused on building teachers’ capability to use digital technology to accelerate learning and enhance student involvement in their learning journey. The project is part of a strategic approach to promoting excellence and equity through the use of technology for all students. This has supported teachers’ professional growth and inquiries, and enabled all students’ to monitor their progress, discuss their learning and share progress with parents and whānau.

Leaders and teachers have established thorough processes to moderate overall teachers’ judgements (OTJs) about each students’ achievement in relation to National Standards. Teachers’ professional learning about writing is adding rigour to their OTJs and providing alignment with the school’s approach to accelerating progress for targeted students. School-wide teachers’ professional development about learning progressions, teaching as inquiry and developments in technology are contributing to increasingly reliable OTJs and building teachers' professional capability.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Many school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence.

Governance processes are effective in addressing equity and excellence in the school. Trustees are highly representative of the school community, have appropriate links to the wider community and iwi, and substantial experience in their governance roles. The board receives extensive data from school leaders which they closely scrutinise to determine the effectiveness of school programmes and to set priorities for school development. Regular reports about the rates of acceleration for targeted at-risk learners and other cohorts across the school enable them to make resourcing decisions that support learning and teaching. Board processes also ensure there is alignment of systems, and ongoing internal review, with focused on accelerating progress for at-risk learners.

Leadership processes are effective in promoting accelerated progress. Many teachers are able to experience leadership roles across the school as a result of a strategic focus on building leadership capability in the school. Senior leaders are providing well informed and effective leadership for learning. Strong direction and leadership from the principal is evident in establishing and maintaining a priority on accelerating student progress. Well-developed understanding about the use of achievement information, internal evaluation processes and evidence-based decision making are contributing to a coordinated focus on addressing disparity for identified groups of students. Leaders’ high expectations for teacher performance and outcomes for students, along with the establishment of orderly and supportive environments, are also making an important contribution to promoting excellence and equity.

There are robust, well managed and closely monitored processes in place that enable the delivery of teaching and learning programmes. Curriculum design and enactment ensures that every student has the opportunity to progress through the New Zealand Curriculum and have their learning supported if necessary. Teachers know their learners well, especially the students whose progress needs acceleration. The use of achievement information by teachers to gather evidence and inquire into their practice is making a significant contribution to accelerating progress for target learners.

Collaborative ways of working among teachers and leaders are well developed. Teachers have successfully deprivatised their practice, shared successes, challenges and data to plan specific teaching for targeted learners. These practices are contributing to increasingly focused teaching leading to accelerated progress for target learners.

Through effective use of technology, teachers’ programme planning and curriculum delivery processes are visible to students as the basis for explicit teaching and focused learning. This technology assists students and teachers to assess, evaluate and monitor progress over time. Technology is particularly well used by teachers and target learners to create, develop and monitor individual learning pathways, set goals, reflect on their progress and next steps. Technology is also strengthening the partnership for learning by enabling students to gather evidence of their progress to share with parents and whānau.

The integration of pastoral care and learning support processes is contributing to an effective holistic approach to accelerating progress for at-risk learners. The needs of these students are being addressed through a wide range of integrated and closely monitored learning and pastoral support initiatives.

Leaders have worked collaboratively to establish processes that provide clarity of direction and continual improvement to Te Whānau o te Maro bilingual initiative. Optimum use of the strengths and talents of kaiako is evident. Processes to establish and grow teacher capability and student achievement in Te Whānau o te Maro are well developed. The whānau is well organised, generously resourced and guided by a sound philosophical basis. Relationships with teachers are strong and respectful and students benefit from the range of skills that kaiako bring to their roles. The unit is supported by trustees who ensure appropriate resourcing is provided, and pedagogy and structure is sound. Appropriately targeted professional learning for kaiako is being accessed to provide well-informed pedagogical direction for the whānau. In Te Whānau o te Maro, student ownership, voice and choice are well developed and continue to be strengthened.

Systematic and coherent internal evaluation processes are evident in the school through the effective use of achievement information to:

  • establish school priorities, establish targets to accelerate achievement for specific groups of at-risk learners
  • inform decisions about the provision of learning support initiatives
  • establish specific groups of students for teachers’ professional inquiry cycles
  • evaluate student progress and modify teacher practice to achieve more equitable outcomes for learners.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Further development is needed to embed processes to promote student ownership of their learning, progress and understanding of their learning journey.

Currently school targets to accelerate student progress are not inclusive of all students whose learning is at risk. Processes to accelerate progress for Māori students who are underachieving are making a difference. This approach needs to include all students who are not on track to reach the end of year National Standard. Attention to this is needed to address continuing in-school disparity.

Further developments in Te Whānau o te Maro are needed to ensure that learning frameworks used by teachers and students are more closely aligned with Nga Whaneketanga. This will enable students’ progress to be tracked as they progress with their learning. Kaiako should also continue to develop the school’s local curriculum in response to Te Marautanga o Aotearoa.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014. 

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Education (Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016 established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989.  The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

At the time of this review there were 27 international students attending the school including no exchange students.

The school has comprehensive systems to ensure quality provision of pastoral care and education. Students are given many opportunities and are well-supported to be involved in and integrate with the school and local community. The school’s monitoring and review systems to ensure compliance and improvement are ongoing and responsive.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

Agreed next steps are to:

  • review the approach to setting annual targets to focus more clearly on all students whose learning is at risk

  • embedding processes to promote student ownership of their learning progress, and understanding of their learning journey.

In addition, in Te Whānau o te Maro, consideration should be given to:

  • continuing to explore resources that enable kaiako to monitor students’ progress and make increasingly dependable judgements about student achievement in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga

  • further developing the school’s local curriculum in response to Te Marautanga o Aotearoa.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Waikato / Bay of Plenty

5 September 2017

About the school 

Location

Tauranga

Ministry of Education profile number

1990

School type

Intermediate (Years 7 and 8)

School roll

1280

Gender composition

Boys 55% Girls 45%

Ethnic composition

Pākehā 43%
Māori 39%
Indian 3%
Samoan 2%
Other Pacific 3%
Southeast Asia 1%
Other Asian 3%
Other European 3%
Other 3%

Provision of Māori medium education

Yes

Number of Māori medium classes

6

Total number of students in Māori medium (MME)

139

Total number of students in Māori language in English medium (MLE)

77

Number of students in Level 1 MME

39

Number of students in Level 2 MME

23

Review team on site

June 2017

Date of this report

5 September 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review March 2014
Education Review September 2009
Education Review June 2006

 

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Tauranga Intermediate is a large urban school catering for Years 7 and 8 students from surrounding suburbs and districts. At the time of this review, 34% of the 1207 students on the roll identify as Māori and 3% as Pacific. There are 18 international students. The school offers bilingual education for students who wish to learn in te reo Māori. These students form a whānau syndicate and have a significant role in the promotion of Māori language and culture within school protocols and the wider community. Students may also choose to learn in classes for students with special abilities or in multi-media classrooms.

The school has a positive reporting history with ERO. The 2009 ERO report stated that there were high expectations for learning and behaviour, a strong sense of belonging and pride in the school and strong professional leadership from a knowledgeable and experienced principal. Senior leaders and teachers were addressing the school’s priorities of raising literacy and mathematics, as well as promoting a wide range of educational opportunities for students. Since then, there have been changes within the board, senior leadership team and staff. This review finds that the positive features identified in the 2009 ERO report continue to be evident, and that senior leaders have responded effectively to recommendations in that report.

During the last four years, there have been significant property and resourcing developments. The board has managed the construction of a substantial new gymnasium and a whare kai near the bilingual unit. A number of remediation building projects have been well managed to minimise disruption to student learning. The school’s information and communication technologies (ICT) infrastructure has been enhanced to provide equitable access to computers for students as tools for learning in all classrooms. There has also been an extensive addition to Ngamuwahine, the school’s outdoor education facility, which is situated on the boundary of Kaimai/Mamaku Forest Park.

The school’s culture reflects the community developed values of STARS, which stands for Safety, Team, Achieve, Respect and Sense of humour. Students are expected to explore and achieve. There is a settled and purposeful tone across the school.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school makes extensive use of achievement information to improve students’ learning and achievement. National Standards' requirements are well implemented and moderated. Assessment information is well analysed and interpreted at all levels of the school.

Achievement information is used very effectively by:

  • trustees to make informed resourcing decisions and set specific targets to raise student achievement
  • the senior leadership team to determine learning priorities, monitor the effectiveness of teaching programmes and identify professional development needs
  • syndicate leaders to monitor the impact of teaching practices in their teaching teams and guide continual improvement
  • teachers to implement learning experiences that respond to students’ needs and special abilities, to accelerate progress for targeted students, and to report progress and achievement to parents
  • learning support staff to implement a wide range of suitable programmes and interventions to accelerate the progress of students who require extra assistance
  • students to identify their learning goals and specific next steps, and to lead three-way conferences with parents and teachers about their individual achievement and progress.

Senior leaders and teachers can demonstrate accelerated progress for students who enter the school with low achievement levels. Many students, including those from Māori/Pasifica backgrounds, achieve at and above expectations for their year levels.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum, developed in consultation with the community, is effective in promoting and supporting student learning. It continues to place strong priorities on literacy, mathematics, e-learning and thinking skills. Comprehensive reading, writing and mathematics frameworks provide clear direction for teaching. Senior leaders are reviewing curriculum documents to ensure that there are clear school-wide teaching expectations for all learning areas. Self review processes have identified the need to further develop inclusive practices in Māori contexts across the curriculum.

Teachers demonstrate a high level of professionalism, accountability and commitment to students and the school. A wide variety of effective school-wide teaching practices include establishing high expectations for learning and behaviour and maintaining positive interactions with and among students. There has been significant development in the deliberate use of ICT to facilitate learning across the curriculum.

Students are highly engaged in meaningful class programmes. They continue to experience a broad and extensive range of active, real-life learning opportunities. Special features are regular education outside the classroom activities, which include learning experiences at Ngamuwahine and opportunities to visit other countries.

Students benefit from accepting a variety of leadership roles and responsibilities. Many achieve recognition for outstanding achievement at school, regional and national level in sporting, cultural, academic and community service activities. They are well coached and assisted by teachers, parents and other supporters of the school.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school effectively promotes educational success for Māori as Māori. Students spoken with by ERO are proud to be Māori and appreciate opportunities to promote their language and culture. Overall Māori students make significant progress during their time at the school, and many achieve well academically. Those students who are at risk of underachieving benefit from targeted programmes that accelerate their progress. Māori students are well represented in school leadership roles.

Support for Māori achievement continues to be a significant strategic priority. Regular whanāu hui provide opportunities for parents to discuss Māori student achievement and target-setting to accelerate progress. The senior leadership team acknowledges that there is a need to strengthen the school-wide focus on culturally responsive teaching practices that enhance culture, language and identity for Māori students in mainstream classes.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance because of the following positive features.

Governance is effective. Trustees bring an appropriate range of complementary skills and expertise to their roles and responsibilities and regularly reflect on their performance. The board is very well informed about student achievement and focused on supporting staff to provide high quality education for all students. There is a clear and comprehensive strategic direction.

The principal continues to provide strong professional leadership for the school community. He is ably supported by the senior leadership team who have significant curriculum knowledge and shared understandings of best teaching practice. They provide professional coaching and modelling for teachers to ensure that the impact of professional learning is sustained. Leaders emphasise the importance of critical reflection and high standards. There is a collaborative approach to building and sustaining a community of learners and a clear focus on building leadership capability across the staff.

The pastoral care needs of students are recognised and well catered for within an inclusive school culture. Restorative practices are well-established throughout the school. The pastoral care team which includes counsellors, mentors and support staff is approachable, always available to students, and well funded by the board.

The principal and senior leaders have established strong links between the school and its community. Parents actively participate in camping, sports, cultural and successful fund-raising activities. They are regularly consulted and informed about school events and achievements. Effective communication with contributing schools and local colleges facilitates transition to and from the intermediate.

Self review is well established and highly effective in promoting continuous improvement. Reviews are improvement focused and well documented at all levels of the school. They include the views of students and have a continual focus on raising progress and achievement. Reviews lead to rigorous professional discussion to ensure that high quality systems and processes are sustained and improved over time.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. At the time of this review there were 18 international students attending the school.

The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

ERO’s investigations confirmed that the school’s self-review process for international students is thorough. There is a strong focus on providing high quality pastoral care and successful English language learning for all international students.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

The board has continued to update and review its policies and practices about providing a safe physical and emotional environment for students.

  • Each board of trustees is required to provide a safe physical and emotional environment for students.
    [National Administration Guideline 5(a)]

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

14 March 2014

About the School

Location

Tauranga, Bay of Plenty

Ministry of Education profile number

1990

School type

Intermediate (Years 7 to 8)

School roll

1207

Number of international students

18

Gender composition

Boys 55% Girls 45%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Asian

Pacific

Indian

Other European

Other

51%

34%

3%

3%

2%

6%

1%

Special Features

Bilingual unit comprising four classes Ngamuwahine Outdoor Education Lodge

Review team on site

November 2013

Date of this report

14 March 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

September 2009

June 2006

October 2002