Rangiuru School

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Summary

Rangiuru School is a rural school located in the district of Te Puke. It provides education for children in Years 1 to 8, most of whom travel by bus from out of town. The school roll of 40 includes 16 Māori children. The school is committed to maintaining rural values and traditions, and has strong community support and involvement. The school is part of the newly established Te Puke Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako.

Since the previous ERO review in 2014, the school has undertaken a review of its charter and developed a new shared vision and values. Local curriculum development is supporting expectations for teaching and learning. Promoting te reo and tikanga Māori is central to the school’s priorities. The school has introduced one-to-one digital devices to support and engage children’s learning in the use of technology. Since 2016 professional learning and development for teachers has focused on accelerating literacy learning in writing. The school has developed a curriculum and achievement plan to identify children at-risk of not achieving and prioritise learning support. Data over the past three years shows children have consistently achieved well in reading, writing and mathematics.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school is responding well to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement needs acceleration.

Some school processes are effectively enabling the achievement of equity and excellence including:

  • culturally responsive practices

  • teaching strategies

  • the localised curriculum

  • positive partnerships with parents.

Further developments are needed in the strategic alignment of school-wide targets, internal evaluation systems and processes, and curriculum implementation guidelines.

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and boys remains in writing. At the time of this review the 2016 achievement data shows that most children are achieving at high levels in reading and mathematics and slightly lower levels in writing. 

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of children’s learning and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

The school has requested that ERO provide them with an internal evaluation workshop.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is responding well to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. The school’s data for 2014 to 2016 shows that most children are achieving at high levels in reading and mathematics and slightly lower levels in writing. There is no disparity between cohorts of students in reading and mathematics. However, achievement trends over the last three years show that, in writing Māori boys are achieving slightly below other children in the school.

Raising the achievement of Māori and other children is an important and valued outcome for leaders and teachers. A strategic approach to empowering Māori learners to be successful is promoting improved outcomes for children. Māori children are engaged in their learning through culturally relevant experiences. Leaders and teachers know the children very well and support them to be successful, as part of an inclusive school whānau.

The newly developed assessment schedule includes clear expectations for the collection of data and a range of appropriate assessment tools. There is a collaborative approach to making overall teacher judgements (OTJs) about children’s achievement in relation to National Standards. Some moderation of these judgements have been undertaken alongside another local school as part of professional learning in writing. Moderation is an ongoing focus for development to maximise the dependability of OTJs.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Some school processes are effectively enabling the achievement of equity and excellence.

School leadership has been effective in promoting culturally responsive practices. These practices and expectations are clearly documented in the Raising Māori Achievement Plan. Māori concepts are integrated into the curriculum and include a school-wide focus each term. The school has close relationships with the local kaumātua who is supportive of school initiatives and activities. A strategic approach to promoting cultural competence is contributing to success and wellbeing for Māori students.

Teachers are using many effective strategies to engage children in meaningful learning. There are strong and positive relationships between teachers and children. Children are well supported in their learning, are confident to take risks and well engaged in problem-solving and group-based activities. Detailed teacher planning, deliberate teaching activities, targeted resourcing, and strong home support further promote children’s learning and achievement. Children participate in a caring, supportive and inclusive environment, and have equitable opportunities to learn and achieve.

Good progress has been made in developing the school’s local curriculum. There is now clarity in the school’s vision and values, which was developed through consultation with children, parents, whānau and community. The school’s values are strongly evident in all aspects of school life, and children enjoy a safe and nurturing learning environment. There are high levels of professional trust and collaboration among leaders and teachers in implementing the curriculum. The revised school curriculum is contributing to an improved focus on equity and continual improvement in learning outcomes for children.

There are strong partnerships for learning with parents and whānau. Parents are welcomed, involved and respected as valued partners in their children’s learning. They feel well informed about progress and achievement. They are listened to, affirmed, and there are many opportunities for ongoing formal and informal communication. Teachers are proactive in involving parents when a learning need is identified. Positive learning partnerships are contributing to a strong sense of belonging, inclusion, and a shared focus on accelerating children’s achievement.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Further developments are needed in the strategic alignment of school-wide targets, internal evaluation systems and processes, and curriculum implementation guidelines.

The school’s approach to setting and monitoring targets needs to be more closely focused on children whose learning is at-risk. A more focused approach needs to include:

  • school-wide targets that clearly focus on children whose learning needs acceleration

  • leadership regularly reporting rates of progress for target children to the board

  • trustees scrutinising achievement data to establish how effective programmes are in accelerating the progress of target students to inform resourcing decisions.

There are some aspects of internal evaluation process that need to be strengthened:

  • processes that support teachers to inquire into and improve their practice are not consistently implemented across the school

  • professional learning priorities, appraisal and performance management goals for teachers and leaders need to be more sharply focused and aligned with children whose learning requires acceleration.

The school is redeveloping aspects of its curriculum. At the time of this review documented guidelines to inform teaching and learning in some areas were incomplete. Further work is needed in developing shared understandings about effective pedagogy, formative assessment and teachers’ and students’ use of the learning progressions framework (LPF).

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Actions required

ERO identified non-compliance in relation to consultation with the community about the school’s treatment of the health and physical education curriculum.

In order to address this the board must:

  1. comply with the requirement to adopt a statement on the delivery of the health curriculum, at least once in every two years, after consultation with the school community [Section 60B Education Act 1989]

  2. comply with the relevant employment agreement by ensuring the principal has a signed performance management agreement with the board of trustees. [s77C State Sector Act 1988; Primary Principals’ Collective Agreement]

To improve current practice, the board of trustees should:

  • ensure leaders and teachers strengthen the range of appraisal evidence including regular reflection and documented observations in accordance with New Zealand Education Council requirements. 

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and boys remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of children’s learning and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

The school has requested that ERO provide them with an internal evaluation workshop.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Waikato / Bay of Plenty

27 June 2017

About the school 

Location

Te Puke

Ministry of Education profile number

1921

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

40

Gender composition

Boys 27 Girls 13

Ethnic composition

Māori 16
Pākeha 24

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

May 2017

Date of this report

27 June 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review May 2014
Education Review June 2011
Education Review May 2008

 

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Rangiuru School is a country school located on the outskirts of Te Puke. The current roll of 61 students includes 31 students who identify as Māori, most whakapapa to Tapuika, the local iwi. The school caters for students in Years 1 to 8, almost half of whom come from the township of Te Puke on the school-owned bus.

Since the 2011 ERO review there have been changes to board membership. Teachers have focused on improving school-wide testing, data collection and analysis. Junior classes have been renovated and information and technology equipment upgraded. Teachers continue to develop students’ capacity to take responsibility for managing their own learning as identified in the 2011 ERO report.

High levels of support and involvement by parents and the community continue to be a feature of Rangiuru School. The school is proud of its country heritage and describes its approach as 'Country traditions in the 21st Century'.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The vast majority of students are achieving at or above the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics.

School leaders use achievement data to identify those who are not achieving and to set appropriate targets for improvement.

Teachers know their students well and have a good understanding of their learning and pastoral care needs. They use a wide range of appropriate assessment tools to ascertain students’ levels of achievement in reading, writing and mathematics. Teachers make good use of this achievement information to group students according to their needs and to identify next steps in learning for them.

Students needing extra support or extension in their learning are identified and catered for in classrooms. The school employs a teacher’s aide to provide extra support for those who need it and provides specialised assistance for those who need help with their reading. The school works proactively with outside agencies to assist students with specific identified needs.

Parents receive written reports twice yearly showing student progress and achievement against the National Standards. These reports are complemented by two parent/student/teacher conferences where learning and social goals are set.

Staff and ERO agree that development of the implementation of the National Standards assessment framework should continue. A future next step for teachers to further enhance existing systems could be to attend Ministry of Education (MoE) provided courses on Overall Teacher Judgements (OTJs) with a focus on developing an evidential base.

Strengthening performance management so that ongoing teacher development is linked more closely with student achievement through a process of teaching as enquiry, is likely to lead to enhanced outcomes for students.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Students experience a broad curriculum that includes an appropriate focus on literacy and mathematics as well as sporting, arts and cultural opportunities. There are many ways provided by the school for students to learn leadership skills.

Teachers have strong, respectful relationships with their students that are focussed on student learning and wellbeing. They use a variety of effective strategies that include flexible grouping of students according to their needs, classroom environments that support literacy and mathematics learning. The school is a place where students have a sense of belonging. Teachers plan a thematic approach to the teaching of other subjects such as social science, science and health, they include the study of issues and events of importance in the local area.

Parents have opportunities to be involved in student learning through classroom and school-wide programmes and events.

A school-wide focus by teachers on strengthening their support for students to become more “independent thinkers who take responsibility for their own learning” would ensure that this Charter goal will be met.

ERO and school leaders agree that it is now timely to undertake a collaborative process of review of the school’s curriculum document so that it is a more robust mechanism for expressing the school’s values and vision, clarifying expectations of good teaching practice and ensuring a balanced coverage of all area of The New Zealand Curriculum.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

School achievement data shows that Māori students are performing slightly below their non-Māori peers at Rangiuru School but are still performing better than Māori students regionally and nationally in reading, writing and mathematics.

The principal has effective working relationships with Māori parents and with surrounding marae. He has built a strong relationship with a local kaumātua who acts as kaumātua for the school. The principal takes te reo Māori classes in each classroom on a weekly basis and teaches kapa haka to the whole school. All students learn and understand their pepeha.

Some next steps for teachers are to continue to strengthen their own learning and development through additional integration of te reo Māori into their ongoing programmes. This, coupled with reinforcement of the school-wide te reo Māori programmes in classes and development of a sequential approach to local tribal history, is likely to further enrich student identity, learning and growth.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

Rangiuru School is well placed to sustain and improve its performance because:

  • there are positive relationships between staff, board, parents, whānau and community
  • the board of trustees is committed to school development and improving student achievement
  • a welcoming and friendly school culture encourages and supports learning
  • parents and whānau are actively involved in the school and feel they have a voice in decision making
  • school leaders are collaborative and supportive
  • the principal is providing effective professional leadership to both staff and board.

Staff and the board will continue to develop through increased self review, strategic school development designed to sustain and build on students' academic achievement reflected in National Standards results. The school, through the principal and board of trustees, will utilise the strong community partnership to revisit the current charter, curriculum and vision and build on its relevance to the Rangiuru learning community.

It is also important that the board now access external expertise to support them with their ongoing financial management. This will allow the school to plan for future growth, development and learning and teaching needs.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services

Northern Region

28 May 2014

About the School

Location

Te Puke, Bay of Plenty

Ministry of Education profile number

1921

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

61

Gender composition

Boys 40

Girls 21

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Other

30

29

2

Review team on site

March 2014

Date of this report

28 May 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

June 2011

May 2008

February 2005