Pukenui School (Te Kuiti)

We maintain a regular review programme to evaluate and report on the education and care of young people in schools.

We are in the process of shifting from event-based external reviews to supporting each school in a process of continuous improvement.

There may be delays between reviews for some schools and kura due to Covid-19 and while we transition to our new way of reviewing.

Read more about our new processes and why we changed the way we review schools and kura.

Find out which schools have upcoming reviews.

Summary

Pukenui School is a full primary school catering for children in Years 1 – 8. The roll is currently 138 children, 109 of whom are Māori. Most whakapapa to Ngāti Maniapoto, the local iwi. There are also children from other ethnic backgrounds including Pākehā and Samoan.

An experienced principal continues to lead the school. The board comprises a mixture of both new and experienced trustees. Teachers have recently had professional development with a Ministry of Education Student Achievement Advisor (SAF), and are participating in the second year of the Ministry of Education initiative, Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L).

The school’s 2016 achievement data shows that approximately 60% of students achieved at or above the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Over the last three years overall achievement in relation to the National Standards has remained constant. There continues to be higher levels of underachievement for Māori children and boys. The school’s achievement picture is affected significantly by high levels of transience.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school responds well to some Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

A number of school processes are enabling achievement of equity and excellence:

  • Trustees are becoming more focussed on those children whose progress needs to be accelerated.

  • Children benefit from warm, respectful relationships with teachers.

  • Teachers are building their understanding of children and their learning needs through processes such as teaching as inquiry.

Further developments are required in the following areas:

  • developing and monitoring specific and measureable achievement targets

  • monitoring the rates of progress for identified individuals and groups of at-risk learners

  • developing teachers’ use of formative assessment strategies to improve learning and teaching

  • developing consistent expectations for effective teaching practice.

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all learners. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and/or other learners remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the learners whose progress and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each learner

  • need to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of learners’ progress and achievement

  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate learners’ progress and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate progress for learners
  • monitortargeted planning, improved teaching, and learners’ progress
  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO will:

  • provide feedback and resources to support the development of more targeted planning
  • provide an internal workshop to support the school to develop effective planning and monitoring processes to support equity and excellence for all learners.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school responds well to some Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

From 2014 to 2016 achievement data in reading, writing and mathematics shows a consistent pattern of achievement, with approximately 60% of students achieving at or above the National Standards over this time. There continues to be high levels of underachievement for Māori children and boys.

The school’s mid-year data for 2017 indicates an increased number of at-risk learners are tracking towards achieving the National Standards by the end of the year.

The school is continually reviewing and strengthening the process for making overall teacher judgements (OTJs), about children’s achievement in relation to the National Standards. Senior leaders agree that it is now necessary to review and strengthen the way teachers record their ongoing observations of children’s progress.

The school’s learning support team is highly responsive and innovative in supporting children with additional needs. The team accesses a wide range of support when children enter into the school, and ensures support continues when children transition out. Parents of children with additional needs are well engaged as partners in their children’s learning.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Some school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence.

Leadership has a strong focus on wellbeing and equitable outcomes for all children. There are opportunities for children to experience success across a range of curriculum areas. Children have a strong sense of belonging within a culture where difference is celebrated. Leaders have developed a culture of collaboration within the teaching team.

The school has close links to the wider community. Parents and whānau are well involved in their children’s learning. Children have more opportunities to experience success in areas that respond to their needs, interests, culture and identity.

Children are benefiting from warm, respectful relationships with teachers. They feel supported in their learning. Restorative social problem-solving practices are evident. The school values are well promoted and understood by children.

Teachers are increasingly using contexts for learning that are relevant and meaningful for children who are well-engaged in class. They have high expectations for children and their learning.

A culture of ongoing inquiry and improvement is developing. Teaching as Inquiry (TAI) is becoming an important process for building teacher capability.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

To achieve equity and excellence further development is needed in:

  • developing and monitoring specific and measureable achievement targets

  • monitoring the rates of progress for identified individuals and groups of at-risk learners

  • developing teachers’ use of formative assessment strategies to improve learning and teaching

  • developing consistent expectations for effective teaching practice.

Regular and ongoing reporting to the board should inform trustees of progress made towards meeting charter targets. Monitoring and tracking the rates of progress at syndicate and classroom level for children whose progress requires acceleration, needs to be strengthened.

To increase teacher effectiveness, leaders and teachers need to improve assessment practices for identifying children’s next steps in learning. This should enable teachers to more specifically target identified learners needs. Strategies that empower children as leaders of their own learning should also be a priority.

The review and updating of expectations for teachers about effective classroom practice is needed to ensure there are shared understandings about effective teaching. Robust accountability systems should ensure greater consistency across the school.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all learners. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and/or other learners remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the learners whose progress and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each learner

  • need to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of learners’ progress and achievement

  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate learners’ progress and achievement

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate progress for learners
  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and learners’ progress
  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO

ERO will:

  • provide feedback and resources to support the development of more targeted planning
  • provide an internal workshop to support the school to develop effective planning and monitoring processes to support equity and excellence for all learners.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer

Te Tai Miringa - Waikato / Bay of Plenty Region

14 November 2017

About the school

Location

Te Kuiti

Ministry of Education profile number

1906

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 – 8)

School roll

138

Gender composition

Boys 57% Girls 43%

Ethnic composition

Māori 79%
Pākehā 13%
Pacific 8%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

September 2017

Date of this report

14 November 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review June 2014
Education Review February 2011
Education Review May 2008

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Pukenui School is located in the King Country town of Te Kuiti. The school continues to provide good quality education for students from Years 1 to 8. Students and families are proud of the school and the long-standing and inter-generational connections it has with the community. Te Kuiti is steeped in Māori history. The school has a good relationship with the tangata whenua. Many students have a mix of Māori and European heritage and many are affiliated to Ngāti Maniapoto and Ngāti Rereahu iwi. A small number of students are Samoan.

Te Wairua Motuhake o Pukenui underpins the school’s philosophy, vision and values. These guiding foundations promote a positive, settled tone within the school. School values are well understood by students, staff and parents. Students enjoy positive relationships with each other and their teachers. An inclusive culture is promoted and supports student wellbeing. Students know each other well and help each other within tuakana (older) and teina (younger) relationships.

The board comprises of a range of new and experienced trustees. They ensure the school environment is attractive and well maintained. The board and staff work together to maintain an environment that fosters student learning, progress and achievement.

The board has responded positively to the recommendations noted in the 2011 ERO report. The many notable good features identified in that report have been sustained.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school has developed some useful processes that help teachers to use achievement information and make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement. Students enjoy learning. Teachers interact with students and their families in positive and respectful ways.

The board makes good use of student achievement information to set relevant achievement targets that are focused on improvement. Trustees develop appropriate long-term plans to help the school meet its achievement targets in relation to the National Standards. Evaluating the outcome of these plans would help to further strengthen teachers’ capacity to respond to students’ learning strengths and needs.

Overall school achievement data shows that students are progressing well in reading and mathematics, but not as well in writing, in relation to the National Standards. The achievement of Māori students is similar to that of their non-Māori peers. Data on school reading support programmes show that some students involved in these programmes make accelerated progress in improving their reading skills.

Professional learning and development is having a positive impact on teaching and learning. Teachers use effective teaching strategies to foster student learning. These include strategies that focus on helping to improve students’ writing skills. Teachers are increasingly using specific teaching strategies that enhance students’ ownership of learning.

Parents receive high quality information about student achievement in school reports and through student led discussions at school. Students share their learning and set goals in discussions with their parents and teachers. Parents value these learning conversations.

All staff maintain a focus on student wellbeing alongside the focus placed on student achievement. Priority learners, including Pacific students who are second language learners, are carefully identified and receive appropriate learning support. Trustees provide financial support to enable all children access to education outside the classroom opportunities, such as those connected to sporting and cultural activities.

School leaders have identified the importance of continuing professional learning conversations with teachers to further develop effective strategies for:

  • critiquing and guiding targeted teaching for students whose progress needs accelerating
  • strengthening the consistency of moderation processes used to help teachers make overall judgements about student progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Pukenui School's curriculum is developing its effectiveness to promote and support student learning and engagement. The school’s curriculum is closely aligned to the principles and key competencies of The New Zealand Curriculum (NZC). Curriculum design priorities for the school include:

  • a strong focus on literacy and mathematics that includes learning support programmes
  • initiatives that foster students’ emotional and social competence
  • meaningful acknowledgement of Māori culture and tīkanga and acknowledgement of other cultures to promote student confidence and engagement.

The curriculum gives students a range of authentic learning experiences and promotes their enjoyment and success in sports and performing arts. Leadership opportunities allow students to act as role models, lead assemblies and actively participate in the School Council.

School leaders and staff have begun to review their curriculum implementation plans with a view to increasing the focus on developing a localised curriculum that includes strengthened bicultural perspectives. Initial work in this area has been well supported by local kaumatua.

Work has also begun on developing a school inquiry model that aims to help students learn strategies for taking greater ownership of their learning.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Pukenui School effectively promotes educational success for Māori, as Māori. Students participate in a high quality Māori programme taught by a specialist kaiako. Students learn waiata, te reo and local Māori history. Māori students are active as leaders in school pōwhiri and kapa haka.

Māori students are proud to be Māori and report that they feel valued and safe at school. They have positive relationships with their teachers and participate fully in the life of the school.

Kaumatua and parents of Māori students are supportive of the school. The principal values working alongside local kaumatua and whānau to support curriculum and programme initiatives. Discussions are underway to find out more about the Ngāti Maniapoto iwi education plan and how it can complement the school’s curriculum.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

Trustees have strategically developed long-term plans that promote greater success for students who are Māori and Pacific. The board and principal are culturally responsive to the needs of the community. Work is continuing on planned actions that include conversations with whānau and aiga about implementing Ministry of Education strategies such as Ka Hikitia and the Pacific Education Plan. Appropriate use of current research could further improve student engagement and achievement.

Trustees bring a range of skills and experience to the board, and use their knowledge appropriately to focus on positive student outcomes. Trustees acknowledge the usefulness of continuing to work on developing effective self-review processes to support the school’s focus on accelerating student achievement.

School programmes actively promote student wellbeing. School leaders work well together and make good use of external providers and local initiatives that foster student wellbeing. Along with staff, they have begun to review processes that support student wellbeing and academic success. They have identified the following next steps:

  • evaluating the effectiveness of targeted support programmes designed to accelerate progress and learning and to foster wellbeing for success
  • strengthening transition processes with local early childhood services and the high school
  • continuing to strengthen connections with the Pacific community so that home and school learning partnerships are fostered.

Progressing these next steps should further increase the school’s capacity to sustain and improve its performance.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

18 June 2014

About the School

Location

Te Kuiti

Ministry of Education profile number

1906

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

158

Gender composition

Boys 52% Girls 48%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Samoan

African

72%

20%

7%

1%

Review team on site

March 2014

Date of this report

18 June 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

February 2011

May 2008

February 2005