Ohope Beach School

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School Context

Ohope Beach School is located in Ōhope Village, east of Whakatane. It caters for students in Years 1 to 6, and has a roll of 245 students, 71 of whom identify as Māori. The proportion of Māori students on the roll has increased since the 2014 ERO review.

The school’s stated vision is to challenge and support their students to be the best that they can be (Ki te taki, ki te tautoko i o tātou tamariki, kia tae rātou ki o rātou na paingia). The school’s motto, ‘Dream, Believe, Achieve’ and PRIDE values - positivity, respect and responsibility, integrity, diligence, empathy - are well-known by the students.

Ōhope Beach School has a number of strategic goals for 2019, including to:

  • foster student achievement (prioritising progress and achievement in numeracy and literacy)
  • champion Māori culture
  • use ICT effectively
  • maintain high-quality staff.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, school-wide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • achievement in reading, writing and mathematics.

Since the 2014 ERO review, the senior leadership team and teaching staff have remained stable. The school has undergone substantial structural site work with the removal of the old classrooms and the creation of a large, new building in an innovative learning environment (ILE) style. In 2017 and 2018, this construction work had significant impact on school operations. As of 2019, all learning is accommodated in the new building which houses four classroom spaces with two teachers each, and one classroom space with three teachers.

The school is a member of the Whakatane Community of Learning (CoL)|Kāhui Ako.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is achieving excellent outcomes for most students but is not achieving equitable outcomes for all.

The school’s achievement data for 2018 shows that most students achieved at or above expected national curriculum levels in reading and mathematics, and the large majority achieved at or above expected national curriculum levels in writing.

The school’s longitudinal achievement data shows patterns of ongoing disparity. Māori students achieved significantly less than their Pākehā peers, with disparity in reading, writing and mathematics. The level of disparity in reading and writing has increased over time. There is also increasing disparity in achievement between boys and girls in reading and writing. Boys are achieving comparably to girls in mathematics.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school’s analysed achievement information shows that some at-risk students, including Māori, have made accelerated progress. The school has been most successful in the acceleration of students in reading.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Teachers are responsive to individual student’s interests and needs. Use of the surrounding natural environment in authentic ways is a valued feature of the curriculum. Students benefit from a range of learning opportunities in the areas of sports, culture and the arts. Aspects of te ao Māori are integrated into the architectural design of the new building, and students have opportunities to be involved in kapa haka. Students are actively engaged in their learning and teachers use a range of information to plan for individual student needs. A number of interventions and programmes is available to support the learning of students who are at risk of underachieving.

Students with additional needs are well supported. A close working relationship with the resource teacher for learning and behaviour (RTLB) provides the special education needs co-ordinator (SENCO) with relevant access to external agencies and professional networks. The school’s strong, professional engagement with the Whakatane CoL is enabling shared professional development opportunities for teachers supporting students with additional needs. The SENCO develops individual education plans (IEPs) for a number of students to support positive learning and behaviour outcomes. Transitions into and out of the school for students with additional needs and their families are well supported by the SENCO and teachers.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Leaders and teachers have identified, and this evaluation supports, the following areas that require continuing development:

  • ongoing support for the teachers in working within the innovative learning environment
  • the management and use of student achievement information to track and monitor the accelerated progress particularly for Māori and boys at risk of underachieving
  • regularly reporting to the board on the progress of at-risk targeted students throughout the year
  • strengthening internal evaluation to determine the impact of interventions particularly for at-risk students.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Children’s Act 2014.

Areas for improved compliance practice

To improve current practice, the board of trustees have begun to implement:

  • the review process for documenting discussions for ‘in-committee’ meetings

  • the policy regarding safety checking of the workforce

  • the process to receive reports at least once per year in relation to teacher registration and appraisal.

4 ERO’s Overall Judgement

On the basis of the findings of this review, ERO‘s overall evaluation judgement of Ōhope Beach School’s performance in achieving valued outcomes for its students is:  Developing – particularly processes and practices for accelerating the learning for at-risk Māori and boys.

ERO’s Framework: Overall School Performance is available on ERO’s website.

5 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • teaching practice that is responsive to students’ wellbeing and learning needs
  • responsive programmes and interventions that support students with additional needs.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • ongoing professional development to support teaching practice in the innovative learning environment

  • the management and effective use of achievement data to support accelerated progress and improved outcomes for learners who are at-risk of underachieving

  • internal evaluation processes and practices to inform strategic planning with a focus on equitable outcomes for all learners.

Phillip Cowie

Director Review and Improvement Services

Central Region

14 June 2019

About the school

Location

Ōhope

Ministry of Education profile number

1857

School type

Contributing School (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

245

Gender composition

Male 48% Female 52%

Ethnic composition

Māori 29%
NZ European/Pākehā 60%
African 2%
Asian 2%
Other ethnic groups 7%

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

Yes

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

February 2019

Date of this report

14 June 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review September 2014
Education Review October 2011
Education Review October 2008

Findings

Ohope Beach School is providing students with high-quality opportunities to achieve success with their learning. Targeted programmes are planned for all students achieving below expected levels. The school enjoys a strong partnership with parents and whānau, and there is a culture of high expectations and respect throughout the school.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Ohope Beach School is located in Ohope Village near Whakatane. The school is situated in a picturesque setting adjacent to Ohope Beach and rests on Ngāti Awa Iwi lands. The board is currently working with the Ministry of Education to plan significant upgrades and major property alterations on the school site.

The school caters for 293 students in Years 1 to 6, of whom approximately 44 identify as Māori. Since the last ERO review in 2011, the teaching team has remained stable and the principal has continued to provide highly effective professional leadership. In addition, four new trustees, who bring a range of complementary skills, have been elected to the board. The school continues to benefit from strong community support and a close partnership with parents.

The school values of ‘Dream, Believe, Achieve’ are well known to students and staff and underpin a highly positive culture that is focused on learning and success for all.

The school has a positive reporting history with ERO.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school makes very effective use of student achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement.

Teachers gather data about student achievement using a range of appropriate standardised tests, together with teachers’ professional observations of student learning. They use this data to make judgements about individual students’ achievement in relation to National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. When collated, this information shows that almost all students are achieving well in these core learning areas, and many students are making accelerated progress. Students also experience considerable success in sporting and cultural activities including a successful and well-supported kapa haka group.

Trustees use achievement information very well to review overall school effectiveness and to make appropriate resourcing decisions. Achievement information is also used by trustees to monitor student progress against school-wide goals outlined in the strategic plan.

The principal and senior leaders make highly effective use of achievement information to set appropriate annual targets to raise student achievement levels. Progress towards these targets is closely monitored and reported to trustees at regular intervals. Achievement targets are set and closely monitored for all students achieving below expected levels. Senior leaders also make good use of achievement data to prioritise and plan teacher professional learning, and to develop appropriate teacher performance goals.

At the classroom level, teachers carefully monitor student progress to plan programmes that address individuals’ emerging learning needs. Teachers are developing strategies to reflect on their professional practice, trial new initiatives, and keep up to date with current research and best practice. Teachers also use a wide range of data to report to parents about individual student progress and achievement. Individual student portfolios, student-led interviews and an open-door policy enable parents and families to be well informed about student achievement and progress.

The school is continuing to explore ways to encourage parent participation in their child’s learning and to build students’ capability as reflective learners.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school has developed a local curriculum that is highly responsive to the needs of Ohope Beach students. The curriculum is reflective of the principles and values of The New Zealand Curriculum with a special emphasis on competencies that support students’ life-long learning and achievement. The school's curriculum is effectively supported by the use of community resources, the local environment and contexts for learning. The curriculum places value on fully integrating local Māori history, culture and perspectives in all learning programmes.

The following aspects of the school’s curriculum and organisation contribute to student learning outcomes.

There are school-wide high expectations for student learning and behaviour.

Teachers are committed to ongoing and relevant professional learning that contributes to continual improvements to teacher effectiveness.

There is a school-wide belief that all students can be successful and teachers plan programmes that enable all student to demonstrate their abilities.

Many opportunities are provided to involve students in decisions about their learning, including self and peer assessment.

Teachers make the purpose of learning clear to students, provide students with ongoing feedback, and involve students in establishing next learning steps.

Trustees, school leaders and teachers have taken a strategic and deliberate approach to fostering a meaningful home-school partnership.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school’s approach to promoting success for Māori is highly effective. Data reported by the school shows that Māori students are achieving very well.

Māori perspectives are fully integrated into school life. All students have opportunities to be involved in cultural and performing activities that recognise and affirm te ao Māori (the Māori world).

School environments reflect the strong presence of a Māori dimension. Teachers are committed to promoting the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi and encourage students’ engagement through incidental use of te reo Māori, school waiata, karakia, kapa haka and marae-based experiences. Students benefit from opportunities to practise te reo Māori and key staff members provide leadership for teachers to improve their understanding and use of te reo in classroom programmes.

Māori parents and whānau interviewed by ERO felt welcome in the school and were confident to make a contribution towards promoting success for Māori students.

The board, school leaders and teachers are clearly focused on acknowledging the importance of, and caring for, natural taonga (treasure). Together they fully support school initiatives designed to promote success for Māori students and a greater understanding of bicultural practice for all students.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance. Ongoing improvement and continued high levels of performance are highly likely because:

  • there is robust and effective self review at governance, school leadership and classroom level
  • reflective, supportive and well-informed leadership is demonstrated by the principal
  • the senior leadership team is knowledgeable about teaching and learning, and successful in promoting a culture of teacher professional growth
  • skilled, professional teaching practice is evident in classrooms
  • knowledgeable and well-informed trustees are focused on ongoing school improvement
  • there is a comprehensive teacher performance appraisal programme focused on improving teacher practice and building a collaborative learning culture
  • there is a strong partnership between the school and parent community.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Ohope Beach School is providing students with high-quality opportunities to achieve success with their learning. Targeted programmes are planned for all students achieving below expected levels. The school enjoys a strong partnership with parents and whānau, and there is a culture of high expectations and respect throughout the school.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services

Northern Region

12 September 2014

About the School

Location

Ohope

Ministry of Education profile number

1857

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

293

Gender composition

Girls 56% Boys 44%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Other European

Other

76%

15%

8%

1%

Review team on site

July 2014

Date of this report

12 September 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

October 2011

October 2008

August 2005