Mt Maunganui Intermediate

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Education institution number:
1837
School type:
Intermediate
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
731
Telephone:
Address:

Lodge Avenue, Mount Maunganui

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School Context

Mt Maunganui Intermediate is a large urban school that caters for students in Years 7 and 8 from the local community and surrounding districts. The current roll of 637 includes 177 Māori students and 16 international students.

The school’s vision and mission statement documents the intent to provide a quality education to develop confident, connected and actively involved life-long learners. Values promoted within the school are respect, pride, and being a bold and capable learner. The school’s charter states a commitment to developing policies and practices that reflect New Zealand’s cultural diversity and the unique position of Māori.

Historical Year 7 entry data indicates a continuing pattern of disparity for Māori, reflective of demographic data across local schools. Commitment to an inclusive culture that welcomes all learners, and the provision of a responsive curriculum specific to the needs of emerging adolescents, is central to the schools approach to raising achievement.

Since the last ERO review in 2014 three new trustees have joined the board. Early in 2017 a new deputy principal and several teachers were appointed. Professional learning and development initiatives have focused on writing, assessment and open-to-learning leadership and restorative practices. The school is a member of the Mt Maunganui Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, school-wide achievement information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • reading, writing and mathematics.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is continuing to raise overall levels of achievement for its students. The school’s end of year data over successive years, for year level cohorts, indicates improving levels of achievement in reading, writing and mathematics. Achievement data from 2014 to 2017 indicates that most students are achieving at the expected standards in reading. In writing and mathematics, the majority of students achieved the standards. Girls and boys are now achieving at comparable levels in reading and mathematics. However girls continue to outperform boys in writing. Significant disparity remains between Māori and other groups of learners in the school.

1.2 How effectively does this school respond to those Māori and other students whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is strengthening its response to those Māori and other students whose learning and achievement need acceleration. Recent data (end of year 2017) indicates some reduction in disparity for Māori. The school’s mid-year data for the 2016/17 Year 8 cohort shows that, in reading and writing, the majority of Māori girls and boys made accelerated progress. In mathematics the small majority of Māori girls and less than half of Māori boys made accelerated progress.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Curriculum design is responsive to identified learning needs. There is strong emphasis given to reading, writing and mathematics. Expectations for learning and teaching are clear and well understood. Teachers are increasingly using effective strategies including instructional and differentiated group teaching, and frameworks that scaffold student’s learning, particularly in writing. Students with additional learning needs are well supported in classroom programmes and specialist interventions. Teachers are responsive to student’s ideas and interests and there are opportunities for them to engage in authentic and integrated learning. These approaches are contributing to high levels of student engagement.

Leaders are providing clear direction about learning and teaching. Senior leaders have taken a strategic approach to growing relational trust and school-wide leadership of learning. There are high levels of collaboration among the wider leadership team. Open-to-learning conversations have been used as a key strategy for building teacher capability. There is a strong professional learning and development focus on teaching strategies to raise student achievement.

The school has a positive culture for learning. Students learn in orderly and inclusive environments that are supported by the Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L) system and school values. Leadership actively involves students in the development of an environment that supports their learning and wellbeing.

Teachers and parents are involved in educationally powerful partnerships for learning. There are many opportunities for them to engage in reciprocal and learner-centred relationships. Student-led conferences enable students to share their learning and develop goals in partnership with their parents and teacher. Parents are supportive of the school and make a valued contribution to the wider curriculum for all students.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence?

Performance management systems and practices need strengthening and do not fully reflect the Education Council requirements and guidelines. The school has been trialling a new appraisal process and this now needs to be consistently implemented by all leaders and teachers.

The use of assessment and achievement information needs strengthening. Leaders now need to place priority on:

  • making better use of school-wide achievement information to inform internal evaluation
  • developing specific and measurable targets for all identified groups of at-risk learners and report regularly to the board on the progress of these students
  • teachers making better diagnostic use of classroom assessment information to plan specifically to meet the needs of at risk learners, including supporting students to understand their specific next learning steps.

Culturally responsive practice needs further development. The school’s focus needs to include:

  • developing a strategic approach for the long term sustainability of the whānau class

  • more consistent implementation of the principles of Ministry of Education documents, Tataiako and Ka Hikitia.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Education (Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016 (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

At the time of this review there were 16 international students attending the school.

International students are well supported at Mt Maunganui Intermediate to undertake a wide range of positive experiences both within the school and outside in the local community. Generous resourcing and a robust policy framework supports the school to provide quality educational experiences in a safe and responsive environment.

Actions for compliance

ERO identified non-compliance in relation to learning languages as stated in the New Zealand Curriculum.

In order to address this the board of trustees must work towards offering students opportunities for learning second or subsequent languages. [The New Zealand Curriculum]

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • leadership that is transparent, collaborative and focused on building higher levels of teacher capability

  • children experiencing a diverse range of learning experiences in a culture that supports the emerging adolescent

  • parent partnerships that are learning focused and contribute to improved student outcomes

  • a responsive curriculum that values core curriculum outcomes and is highly engaging for students.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, development priorities are in:

  • performance management systems to promote consistent levels of teacher performance

  • the use of data from a range of sources, to support internal evaluation

  • teaching and assessment practices to improve outcomes for students who are underachieving. 

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in three years.

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer

Te Tai Miringa - Waikato / Bay of Plenty Region

16 February 2018

About the school

Location

Mount Maunganui

Ministry of Education profile number

1837

School type

Intermediate (Years 7 to 8)

School roll

637

Gender composition

Boys 53% Girls 47%

Ethnic composition

Pakeha 60%
Māori 28%
Asian 4%
Other European 4%
Pacific 2%
Other 2%

International Students

16

Special feature

Bilingual whānau class

Review team on site

November 2017

Date of this report

16 February 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review May 2014
Education Review May 2011
Education Review May 2009

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Mt Maunganui Intermediate School is a large urban school that serves the local community and surrounding districts. In recent years significant roll growth has resulted in a need for more classrooms. The current roll is 541 Years 7 and 8 students. Thirty percent of these students are of Māori descent and include a significant proportion who affiliate to Ngai Te Rangi.

Students are involved and enthusiastic about their school. They benefit from a school-wide focus to support their wellbeing and learning. There are many opportunities for students to participate in extra-curricular activities. Parents and whānau are an integral part of the school’s learning community. They are regularly consulted about the aspirations they have for their children, willingly participate in school activities, and make significant contributions to the school’s wider curriculum.

School improvement is underpinned by a well embedded set of shared ‘Coastal Values; Whakaute, Whakahii, and Akonga’ (Respect, Pride and Learner). These values are clearly articulated and expressed in everyday actions among students and teachers, and students and students. A collegial approach by trustees, school leaders and staff, ensures that the school’s values and strategic goals are well understood, effectively implemented and frequently reviewed.

Recent strategic staff appointments have complemented the strengths and expertise of the senior and team leaders. A collaborative approach encourages staff to seek leadership opportunities and contribute in many areas of school organisation.

The school has addressed and made significant improvement in the areas for development identified in the 2011 ERO report.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The principal takes an active role in leading the learning and has a clear understanding of high quality teaching. An enthusiastic collegial team, which includes trustees and staff, is effectively managing the implementation of school goals and professional development. They use student achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement. Priority learners are identified and benefit from well resourced and targeted interventions.

Students have a good understanding of what and why they are learning and share this information with parents and whānau during student-led conferences. Parents and whānau are well informed about their child’s wellbeing, engagement, progress and achievement.

Teachers use assessment data to group students and plan for their learning. Ongoing professional development is contributing to improved teaching practice. Leaders have recognised that there is a need to continue to develop teachers’ understanding in how they use achievement information in the following areas:

  • national assessment tools and how they align to National Standards
  • school based assessments of students
  • teachers monitoring and recording observations about individual student progress.
  • This would continue to strengthen overall teacher judgements and further assist student understanding of their progress and achievement.

School National Standard achievement information in reading and mathematics indicates that most students in year seven in 2012 made progress and some priority learners made accelerated progress by the end of 2013. Writing data for this year group of students shows that a greater proportion of priority learners made accelerated progress during their time at the school. This movement of targeted students shows that school interventions are having a positive influence, particularly in writing.

National Standards data for Māori students is below that of European/ Pākehā students in reading, writing and mathematics. Just over half of Māori students are achieving at and above in National Standards for reading. School leaders and trustees are focused on improving Māori student achievement and the strategic goals for 2014 to 2016 have a strong and clear emphasis on raising their levels of achievement.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school curriculum is well designed to promote and support student wellbeing and learning. It is inclusive and responsive to the needs of students and provides authentic learning contexts. There are clear and shared expectations for high quality teaching. Annual curriculum reviews include the aspirations of teachers, students, parents and whānau.

The school is in its fourth year of the Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L) programme. Teachers reflect on what they do and receive regular feedback from team leaders. Positive partnerships among students, teachers, parents and whānau are increasing student engagement and success in learning. PB4L alignment and consultation with other local schools contributes to the effective transition of students from primary schools and to secondary education.

Examples of good teaching practice include teachers:

  • sharing the purpose of learning with students
  • promoting thinking skills among students
  • encouraging students to extend their learning.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The principle of partnership and the school vision provides clear expectations for the promotion of Māori student identity and success.

A whānau class established in 2013 resulted from a proposal from local whānau and the school kaiārahi ki te reo. Students in this class are learning in an environment that effectively promotes their cultural identity and aspirations. A strong sense of belonging contributes to student wellbeing and learning. The Kaiako and Kaiārahi ki te reo leads te reo me ngā tikanga o Ngai Te Rangi in this class and also across the school. In addition, Pacific students who are members of the whānau class are able to learn in a culturally appropriate environment.

The principal is a member of the Ngai Te Rangi Education Reference Group and is working to develop positive educational outcomes for all Māori students. Relationships with whānau, hapu and Ngai Te Rangi have been further strengthened with the provision of a kaumatua and the election of a Māori trustee. In addition, students have opportunities to participate in leadership roles, kapa haka, powhiri, noho marae and the Ra Whakangahau performing arts festival.

School leaders will continue a school-wide focus to improve teacher capability and confidence in te reo me ngā tikanga o Ngai Te Rangi and integrate a progressive and sequential te reo Māori programme across the school.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance because:

  • a comprehensive approach to self review guides school improvement
  • the curriculum promotes student engagement, progress and achievement
  • trustees plan for succession to ensure continuity of governance
  • an holistic and inclusive school culture includes high expectations, student wellbeing, positive relationships, and open communication
  • the strategic plan is clearly defined and provides direction for future development.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. At the time of this review there were four international students attending the school.

The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

ERO confirms that the school’s self-review process for international students is thorough.

Mt Maunganui Intermediate provides a good quality care and education for its international students (IS). All IS students reside with their parents or guardians.

The teacher in charge of IS ensures that all aspects of student wellbeing is considered. The school provides English language tutoring and access to the school’s sporting, cultural and pastoral care facilities. These activities promote IS academic and social development.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

2 May 2014

About the School

Location

Mount Maunganui

Ministry of Education profile number

1837

School type

Intermediate (Years 7 to 8)

School roll

541

Number of international students

4

Gender composition

Boys 52%

Girls 48%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

NZ Māori

Pacific

Asian

Other

59%

30%

2%

3%

6%

Special Features

Bilingual whānau unit

Review team on site

March 2014

Date of this report

2 May 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

May 2011

May 2009

April 2006