Mamaku School

Mamaku School

Te Ara Huarau | School Profile Report

Background

This Profile Report was written within 22 months of the Education Review Office and Mamaku School working in Te Ara Huarau, an improvement evaluation approach used in most English Medium State and State Integrated Schools. For more information about Te Ara Huarau see ERO’s website www.ero.govt.nz

Context 

Mamaku School is in Mamaku Village, northwest of Rotorua. The school provides education for learners in Years 1 to 8. The school HEART values of Honesty, Empathy, Achievement, Respect and Teamwork support the aspiration ‘like the children of Tane we grow’.

Mamaku School’s strategic priorities for improving outcomes for learners are centred in Te Whare Tapa Wha and aim to:

  • provide an inclusive curriculum that promotes wellbeing, identity and belonging

  • grow collective capacity in best practice teaching methods to ensure outcomes for learners are equitable and excellent

  • provide scaffolds that foster children’s understanding of how they are progressing and have choice in their learning.

You can find a copy of the school’s strategic and annual plan on Mamaku School’s website.

ERO and the school are working together to evaluate the extent to which the strategic alignment of resources, systems and staff capability building is improving outcomes for learners.

The rationale for selecting this evaluation is:

  • the need to understand, using both internal and external evaluation, which actions are having the most impact for learners

  • the opportunity to align capacity building strategies with the intent to pursue excellent and equitable outcomes for all learners.

The school expects to see:

  • children’s holistic and individual needs met, to ensure progress and improved outcomes

  • structures and frameworks supporting teaching and learning that are responsive and adaptive to the children and community of Mamaku

  • a curriculum that promotes engagement, choice and shared understanding of the learning process.

Strengths

The school can draw from the following strengths:

  • a range of supports, both internal and external that address the individual needs of students

  • a culture that promotes and supports wellbeing and engagement in the school community

  • a staff focused on collaborative growth, distributed leadership, and the sharing of practice for the benefit of learners.

Where to next?

Moving forward, the school will prioritise continuing to:

  • align structures and frameworks that promote equitable and excellent outcomes for learners

  • grow collective capacity that is focused on inclusive and adaptive practice to meet the individual needs of learners.

ERO’s role will be to support the school in its evaluation for improvement cycle to improve outcomes for all learners. ERO will support the school in reporting their progress to the community. The next public report on ERO’s website will be a Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report and is due within three years.

Phil Cowie
Director Review and Improvement Services (Central)
Central Region | Te Tai Pūtahi Nui

8 September 2022

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement.  educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Mamaku School

Board Assurance with Regulatory and Legislative Requirements Report 2022 to 2025

As of February 2022, the Mamaku School Board of Trustees has attested to the following regulatory and legislative requirements:

Board Administration

Yes

Curriculum

Yes

Management of Health, Safety and Welfare

Yes

Personnel Management

Yes

Finance

Yes

Assets

Yes

Further Information

For further information please contact Mamaku School Board of Trustees.

The next Board of Trustees assurance that it is meeting regulatory and legislative requirements will be reported, along with the Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report, within three years.

Information on ERO’s role and process in this review can be found on the Education Review Office website.

Phil Cowie
Director Review and Improvement Services (Central)
Central Region | Te Tai Pūtahi Nui

8 September 2022

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Mamaku School - 29/10/2018

School Context

Mamaku School is a full primary school catering for students Years 1 to 8. It is situated in the village of Mamaku, north west of Rotorua. The current roll of 122, includes 46 students who identify as Māori. Since the previous ERO review in 2015 the leadership structure has been reviewed and a new deputy principal appointed in 2017. There have been several changes in the teaching staff and the majority of school trustees are new to their governance roles. The school reports that a high number of students enrol and leave throughout the year.

Mamaku School continues to be the heart of its community. The school’s newly developed HEART values are honesty, empathy, achievement, respect and team work. Students are encouraged to demonstrate these values and to achieve their personal best. The school states that everyone brings diverse values, beliefs and backgrounds which make up the uniqueness of the environment. The motto “E tupu tātou pēnei ia Tane” along with the mission statement “Together as one” underpins the culture of the school.

The school is part of the Te Maru o Ngongotaha Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako (CoL). Teachers have recently undertaken professional learning and development focused on cultural responsive pedagogy initiated by the leaders and the CoL.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, school-wide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • reading, writing and mathematics.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is working towards achieving equity and excellence for all students. The school’s data from 2016 to 2017 shows that a large majority of students are achieving at or above the expected levels in mathematics and writing.

Overall reading achievement has increased over the past two years with most students achieving at the expected level. Achievement levels of girls and boys are now comparable. However, significant disparity remains in mathematics where boys are achieving at higher levels than girls. The 2017 data shows that in reading and mathematics, Māori students proportionally are achieving at lower levels than their non-Māori peers and at similar levels in writing.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school is unable to show accelerated progress for those Māori and other students who need this. Leaders now need to develop effective systems to collate analyse and report school-wide data to show the rate and pace of acceleration for all at-risk students. This is necessary to ensure target and priority learners achieve success.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

School leaders have established a culture of high relational trust. They provide a safe and inclusive environment for staff, students and their whānau. There are positive working relationships between the board and the leadership team. Leaders support staff and trustees to build their capability through appropriate and relevant professional learning and development. The recently formed leadership team works collaboratively and is focused on school-wide improvement focussed on equity and excellence.

The school and community are actively engaged in reciprocal learning-centred relationships. Whānau and the wider community are respected and valued as partners in learning and are welcomed and involved in school activities. The school has strong connections with relevant external agencies to support whānau and learners. The community and the school work collaboratively to enhance learning opportunities for students. These practices promote a strong sense of belonging for students, and collegial partnerships between the school, whānau and the community.

The school’s curriculum is broad and responsive to children’s interests. There are many opportunities for students to be involved in a range of curriculum areas including: sport, music, art, science, information technology, kapahaka, performing arts and leadership. Students with additional needs are well supported and integrated into classroom programmes. Teachers take full responsibility for the education and care needs of students by ensuring they participate in all aspects of the learning alongside their peers. Leaders and teachers prioritise working together to provide authentic learning contexts to engage students in their learning.

During classroom observations ERO observed a range of effective teaching strategies that included: positive teacher and student relationships, teacher modelling, use of prior knowledge, purposeful questioning and a balanced approach between teacher-directed and student-led learning.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Leaders, trustees and teachers need to implement an effective approach to accelerating learning for all at-risk students. This should include:

  • developing specific and measurable targets for all at-risk learners and reporting regularly to the board and parents about how effectively progress is being accelerated

  • collating and analysing student achievement data to evaluate the effectiveness of classroom teaching programmes and learning interventions. This will better inform planning, and resourcing decisions

  • teachers consistently making use of classroom assessment information to plan and target the identified learning needs of at-risk learners.

Leaders and teachers need to develop shared and agreed expectations for teaching and learning.

Leaders and teachers need to strengthen the bicultural dimension within the school. This should include:

  • leaders and teachers accessing support to improve their language and knowledge of te reo and tikanga Māori

  • the natural integration of Māori content in all curriculum areas and learning environments.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • the school-wide culture of relational trust that promotes a positive learning environment for students

  • community partnerships that are focused on improved student outcomes.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • school-wide target setting and reporting to include all at-risk learners

  • deliberate teacher planning that is focused on raising achievement

  • internal evaluation processes and practices

  • developing a bicultural dimension to acknowledge and reflect the unique place of Māori as tangata whenua.

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in three years.

Adrienne Fowler

Director Review and Improvement Services

Te Tai Miringa - Waikato / Bay of Plenty Region

29 October 2018

About the school

Location

Mamaku

Ministry of Education profile number

1797

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

122

Gender composition

Girls 52% Boys 48%

Ethnic composition

Māori 38%
Pākehā 57%
Other 5%

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

Yes

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

June 2018

Date of this report

29 October 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review June 2015
Education Review January 2012
Education Review May 2009

Mamaku School - 04/06/2015

Findings

Students at Mamaku School are confident, show pride in their school and have a strong sense of belonging. School leaders and teachers work effectively to maintain a positive school culture and raise student achievement. A feature of the school is the commitment of knowledgeable parents and whānau in school life.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Students at Mamaku School enjoy a safe and inclusive environment for learning in well-maintained buildings and grounds. The school’s values, based on the concept of ‘Together’, are well embedded. Interactions among students, teachers and parents are positive and mutually respectful. Student achievements and successes are recognised and celebrated.

Parents and whānau are involved in sporting, cultural events and classroom programmes. Fund-raising activities make a significant contribution to resources and activities that extend opportunities for children’s learning beyond the school. Parent’s ideas and views are sought and valued through a wide range of consultation processes.

A new principal started at the beginning of term one 2015. He is focused on maintaining good practices in the school and extending the professional capabilities of staff. He is knowledgeable and experienced in the role of principal, and implemented a leadership approach based on the curriculum strengths and skills of teachers. The principal is supported by his deputy and assistant principals to implement both pastoral and curriculum systems.

Trustees bring a wide range of skills to their positions and are supportive of current school initiatives. They are highly focused on their roles and have efficient and robust systems that sustain sound governance practices. Significant long-term developments to property and grounds show the school is well maintained and serves the educational needs of students.

The school was established in the early nineteen hundreds in the historical village of Mamaku. It is west of Rotorua and provides education for students in Years 1 to 8. Most children come from the rural community and the current school roll is 124 students. Thirty-six percent of these students are of Māori descent and are affiliated to a number of iwi throughout Aotearoa/New Zealand.

The school has a positive reporting history with ERO. Some progress has been made in response to the recommendations made in the 2012 ERO report. These are professional development for teachers in reading and writing, agreed expectations for effective teaching practice, feedback about teaching practice, and the use of information and communication technologies (ICT). The principal acknowledges that the professional leadership of learning in the junior school continues to be in need of review.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Students are highly engaged in a wide range of learning activities. They have a good understanding of their achievements and are confident, independent learners. Students in the senior school have a very good understanding about what they need to learn and how they can achieve success. They use teacher feedback to progress their knowledge and understanding of their next steps in learning. Student’s individual successes are celebrated. They lead discussions about their performance and achievement during three-way conferences with their parents, whānau and teacher. Students demonstrate confidence and enjoyment in learning.

The school makes good use of student achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement and learning. School strategic goals are determined using analysed achievement information and there is close alignment between these goals, school targets and decisions about teacher professional learning.

The school’s 2014 achievement data indicates that most students are achieving at and above National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Nearly half of all students who are achieving below expectations in relation to National Standards are Māori. The Special Education Needs Co-ordinator, teacher aides and specialist teachers who have responsibility for literacy and mathematics are assisting these students. A review and evaluation of effectiveness of these roles and initiatives is likely to assist leaders and trustees to make better informed decisions about student progress overtime.

Trustees are well informed by school leaders about student achievement, and use this information to inform their decision-making processes. They acknowledge that there is a need to raise achievement of all students who are at risk of poor achievement, particularly a group of Māori students who are at greater risk of not achieving.

School leaders are focused on raising achievement for all students. They work collaboratively to collate and analyse achievement information in reading, writing and mathematics, and use the data to identify groups of learners who need extra support.

Teachers gather achievement information using a range of nationally referenced tests. They use this information, along with their observations of student learning, to make judgements about student achievement in relation to National Standards. Teachers group students for instruction and closely monitor their progress. Teachers are becoming increasingly reflective about the effectiveness of the teaching strategies they use in planning programmes.

There is a strong commitment to building learning partnerships with parents. They are welcomed into the school to discuss their children’s progress and achievement. There are both informal and formal interviews with teachers, which ensure parents have a good understanding of their children’s learning.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Students experience a rich curriculum where interests and the local environment play a significant role. Frequent reviews ensure the curriculum is relevant and that a wide range of opportunities and experiences are available for students to choose from. There is a range of features in the school’s curriculum that effectively promote and support student learning, particularly in the senior school. These include:

  • the integration of literacy and mathematics into the curriculum through learning themes provide a whole-school focus, which is shared with parents and whānau
  • the positive influence of ICT on teaching strategies and student learning. The effective use of ICT in the senior area contributes to student engagement and progress
  • teachers share the purpose of learning with students and guide them to make meaningful links to their learning pathways
  • students use their interests as a pivotal mechanism in their learning.

There are clear and agreed expectations for teaching and learning in the senior school. The principal and school leaders have recognised the need to extend these high-quality examples of teaching in the senior school, to the junior school.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Trustees have a clearly defined policy, which outlines the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. The policy recognises the challenges faced by the school in effectively promoting the educational success for Māori students as Māori. The school is considering the Ministry of Education documents of Ka Hikitia and Tā Taiako to further develop teacher practices, making them more culturally responsive towards the needs of Māori students.

The school has recognised that it would be beneficial for team leaders to review and develop a te reo and tikanga Māori programme that builds on students’ prior knowledge of Te Ao Māori. This should include a framework that recognises teacher competencies and expertise in the delivery of te reo and tikanga Māori.

There are opportunities for students to take part in kapa haka, noho marae and other activities.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance because:

  • trustees are enthusiastic and knowledgeable
  • the principal has a clear vision for school development and professional learning
  • collaborative leadership opportunities exist for teachers and students
  • positive partnerships with parents and whānau are established
  • teachers share their professional learning to improve their practice
  • there is a process for reviewing school planning and programmes
  • there is strong community support and involvement in the school curriculum.

Trustees and the principal acknowledge the need to review and develop:

  • the roles and responsibilities of senior leaders
  • the school’s appraisal system
  • professional learning and development.

Attention to these areas is likely to improve the consistency of effective teaching and learning in all areas of the school.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Students at Mamaku School are confident, show pride in their school and have a strong sense of belonging. School leaders and teachers work effectively to maintain a positive school culture and raise student achievement. A feature of the school is the commitment of knowledgeable parents and whānau in school life.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

4 June 2015

About the School

Location

Mamaku, west of Rotorua

Ministry of Education profile number

1797

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

124

Gender composition

Boys 50% Girls 50%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākeha

Cook Island Māori

Other

36%

60%

2%

2%

Review team on site

March 2015

Date of this report

4 June 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

January 2012

May 2009

December 2005