Inglewood High School

Inglewood High School - 20/04/2017

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Inglewood High School is a rural secondary school situated in the Taranaki town of Inglewood, south of New Plymouth. It caters for students from Years 9 to 13. At the time of this ERO review, 410 students were on the roll, 12% of whom identify as Māori.

The school has been involved in Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L) programme since 2015. This initiative has strengthened the positive school culture based around the shared MOA values of Manaakitanga, Ora and Ako. An inclusive family-like atmosphere is supported through the vertical pastoral care structure and relationships.

Leaders and teachers have recently been involved in professional learning and development (PLD) to support a new appraisal system, and the increased use of digital technologies in teaching, learning and administration across the school.

The school has been actively involved in the formation of an Inglewood Community of Learning / Kāhui Ako (CoL) that plans to include providers from early childhood through to tertiary levels. A lead principal has been appointed and achievement challenges for the CoL agreed upon.

The school has extended relationships with a range of agencies, employers and education providers to enhance options of learning pathways for students.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school collects a range of achievement information which is well used to make positive changes to outcomes for many learners.

Teachers use information suitably to improve student wellbeing and engagement and to accelerate their learning. This includes using assessment information:

  • about achievement in Year 8 to plan and provide for the transition of students at Year 9, including those with identified learning needs
  • to plan for students' needs and monitor their progress
  • to place students in appropriate programmes or interventions.

Significant numbers of students identified as being at risk of not achieving in Years 11 to 13 are well supported to gain a qualification. As a result, rates of achievement in National Certificates of Educational Achievement (NCEA) have steadily improved since the 2014 ERO report. In 2016, overall achievement at NCEA Levels 1 to 3 were above national rates and well above schools of similar type. Certificate endorsements have fluctuated over the past 3 years and are identified as an area for improvement.

The rates of achievement of students who identify as Maori is improving. The 2016 NCEA results at Level 1 show they have yet to reach that of their peers. However, at Levels 2 and 3 they achieve above their peers and national rates.

ERO affirms the schools initiatives for deeper inquiry into achievement data and evaluation of effectiveness of strategies used to accelerate achievement of groups, especially in Years 9 and 10. More regular reporting to the board of progress of these target groups should help programme evaluation and decision making for resourcing.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Over the last three years the Inglewood High School curriculum content, delivery and timetabling has been reviewed and extended so that it is responsive to diverse groups. As a result it caters well for a wide range of individual needs, abilities and aspirations.

Students’ placements in increasingly personalised learning pathways and programmes promote high levels of motivation, engagement and success, particularly in Years 12 and 13. Careers education provision is highly valued by learners.

Students are well supported through:

  • a range of vocational experiences and visits
  • an effective and collaborative pastoral care and academic mentoring system that provides senior students with increased levels of guidance
  • regular monitoring of academic progress
  • junior students’ wellbeing and engagement in the life of the school being supported by senior student leaders in vertical dean groupings.

The school environment and the inclusive ethos enables students who enter with identified needs to be welcomed, supported and expected to be successful lifelong learners. Their learning and progress are enhanced by well-considered differentiated learning programmes.

Expectations and guidelines for effective teaching are clearly documented in departmental handbooks and evident in classrooms observed by ERO. Increased use of digital tools and programmes promotes students engagement and extends learning opportunities.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school curriculum provides some opportunities for students who identify as Māori to be successful. Te reo Māori programmes enable some students to gain success at senior levels.

The school has placed priority on promoting teachers' cultural competencies and practices. Teachers provide well considered local cultural contexts for learning in their programmes.

It’s timely for the school, in association with whānau, to review the quality and effectiveness of its programmes for promoting educational success for all Māori learners as Māori.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance through ongoing review, managing change and innovation. The well-established board has clear guidelines for their roles and responsibilities. Systems are in place for review of policies and the effectiveness of the board's performance.

Trustees receive and use a range of student information and department reports related to programmes, student achievement and wellbeing. They use this information to purposefully target resourcing for improving outcomes for students.

The principal and senior staff work collaboratively to provide effective leadership to pursue the school’s vision, values and goals. They support, promote and initiate innovation to improve valued student outcomes. Good teamwork across levels, departments and areas of responsibility promotes shared decision making that benefits learners.

Trustees and leaders actively support ongoing staff development and provide appropriate targeted resourcing for accessing expertise to build teacher capability. The appraisal system provides an effective framework for inquiry and ongoing teacher improvement. Next steps are to further develop teacher goal setting and inquiries so that they are more specific, measurable and link explicitly to outcomes for identified groups of target students. Leaders should ensure that an annual appraisal summary is completed for each teacher to show teachers’ strengths, areas for further development and whether practising teacher criteria are met.

Strengthened educational relationships with individual families, agencies, employers and the tertiary providers are enhanced through targeted strategies, staffing and resourcing. A range of strategies including regular meetings, informative newsletters, sharing real time online progress and ongoing consultations with parents and students promotes learning centred relationships for success.

School leaders model and promote ongoing development and use of review and internal evaluation for accountability and to support evidence-based decision making.

Next Steps

Leaders and trustees should:

  • develop more explicit annual targets related to accelerating achievement of groups of students
  • continue to develop a shared understanding and use of internal evaluation to strengthen planning and resourcing decisions for ongoing improvement across the school.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

At the time of this review there was one international student attending the school. The school is planning to increase student numbers in this area.

The school makes good provision for international students. It has robust systems for monitoring students’ wellbeing, progress and integration into the community. The self-review processes support ongoing improvement in provision for these learners.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

20 April 2017

About the School

Location

Inglewood

Ministry of Education profile number

177

School type

Secondary (Years 9 to 13)

School roll

410

Number of international students

1

Gender composition

Male 51%, Female 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Other ethnic groups

12%

86%

2%

Review team on site

February 2017

Date of this report

20 April 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

May 2014

December 2010

June 2006

 

Inglewood High School - 08/05/2014

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Inglewood High School is a rural secondary school situated in the Taranaki town of Inglewood. It caters for students from Year 9 up to Year 13. At the time of this review 469 students were on the roll, 15% of whom identify as Māori. All students transition from a diverse range of contributing primary schools.

Building a positive school culture has been a priority since ERO’s December 2010 review. School leaders have focused on developing an inclusive atmosphere and nurturing environment. Student success is valued. An emphasis on key values underpins a holistic approach to pastoral care.

Teachers promote a sense of belonging by building strong relationships with students and their families. School leaders and trustees have placed importance on enhancing the school's profile and contribution to the local community.

In 2014 many students are bringing their own digital devices to extend the use of technology in some classrooms. School leaders are beginning to consider ways to ensure that technological improvements enhance the learning for all students.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Teachers collect a useful range of achievement information through formal testing as students start at the school and formative assessment during Years 9 and 10. Student progress is successfully tracked and monitored over time.

Leaders identify that many students entering the school need support to improve their literacy levels. School data shows that many make good progress during their first two years in both literacy and numeracy. Junior diploma information gathered shows that the majority of students are meeting school expectations for success by the end of Year 10.

Achievement levels overall are regularly reported to the board. National Certificate of Achievement (NCEA) data at the end of 2013 showed that many students were successful in achieving Levels 1, 2 and 3. Those with merit and excellence endorsements have increased at all levels. School leaders and the board report that the 2013 roll based results were comparable to similar schools nationally. The retention of students into Years 12 and 13 continues to improve.

School support for its Māori students is beginning to show in NCEA data. The percentage of those leaving with NCEA Level 2 has improved since 2011 and more Māori students are achieving NCEA Level 1. While collated results for Māori are below those of other student groups, the school is helping raise their achievement and expectations.

Parents receive reports twice yearly that provide useful information about students' progress in relation to achievement standards, including references to The New Zealand Curriculum key competencies.

School leaders and trustees use collated data to inform decisions about strategic and annual plans. These clearly identify groups of students who are a teaching priority and the board sets appropriate goals for raising achievement.

In order to realise these goals senior leaders should continue to support teachers' better use of achievement information to:

  • more effectively plan for differentiated teaching to meet the varied learning needs of individual students and
  • improve the achievement and success of priority learners, particularly Māori.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The Inglewood High School curriculum purposefully promotes student engagement and progress.

Since ERO's 2010 review, leaders and teachers have placed considerable focus on developing school culture. This has included an emphasis on shared values and high expectations for students “to be the best that they can be”. School values are an integral part of decision making.

A focused approach supports smoother transitions in to the school at Year 9, through increased liaison and sharing of student information with local contributing schools. Individual mentoring provides additional support for students with specific learning needs. Mixed age form classes successfully promote the development of a positive and inclusive atmosphere.

The school's expressed values and processes promote student wellbeing. The schoolwide focus on strengthening teachers' relationships with students is fostering a sense of belonging. The pastoral team work collaboratively to care for students. The school’s good relationships with external agencies offer students appropriate support as required. The high emphasis on participation in sports and out-of-class activities benefits student health and wellbeing. Te Awhinatia provides a safe environment for students to meet and access relevant support.

The pastoral team have identified next steps and ERO agrees that to further develop students wellbeing school leaders should:

  • build teachers' ability to respond appropriately to students' cultural diversity, and
  • increase student voice in decision making.

In 2010 ERO identified that the school needed to develop the capability of teachers to meet the learning needs of all students. Senior leaders have responded to students individual learning needs through timetable changes and an increased range of suitable curriculum pathways. This continues to be an area for ongoing improvement.

Teacher participation in professional learning groups, opportunities to share good practice and improved appraisal has provided a foundation for further development. Leaders should document a shared school-wide understanding of effective teaching that impacts positively on achievement. This should include equitable access to technologies that support learning.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school should strengthen provisions to promote educational success for Māori. Culture, language and identity requires greater consideration and response through the school’s curriculum.

Kapa haka was re-introduced into the school and there has been some development of te reo Māori as a learning area.

While there are some new initiatives to mentor Māori students in Year 9 and Year 13 the impact of these has yet to be determined.

Whānau hui have been held, however school leaders have yet to collate the information gathered.

In order to better promote success for Māori as Māori:

  • trustees, senior leaders and teachers should continue to build their cultural competency
  • senior leaders and teachers should review how the school’s curriculum empowers Māori students to achieve success, develop leadership and contribute to the wider life of the school.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school's governance appropriately focuses its efforts on providing a positive environment for student learning. Succession planning supports continuity of board membership. Sound governance processes and decision making contributes to improvement.

The principal and senior leaders have purposefully led positive changes to school culture and tone. This provides a useful foundation for:

  • making positive changes to curriculum
  • building capability in teaching and learning
  • strengthening partnerships with parents, whānau and the wider community.

A useful process for teacher appraisal contains goals linked to the school's strategic priorities and focuses on the development of teachers' professional knowledge. It is clearly linked to gathering evidence aligned to the registered teachers' criteria. Student voice successfully contributes to teacher feedback.

ERO identifies and the school agrees that improved self review is necessary to sustain and improve its performance. A model for teachers inquiring into their practices has been recently introduced. Senior leaders should ensure this model is robust and evidence based so that it can support their focus on improved outcomes for all students and contribute to embedding a better understanding of school-wide self review.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. At the time of this review eight international students were on the roll. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

Pastoral needs of international student are well catered for and supported through good communication with students, their families and hosts. Students' programmes are tailored to meet their individual needs and interests. Students have opportunities to become involved in local community activities.

Recent change to international student leadership highlights the need for a more rigorous self-review process to ensure that provision for these students continues to be responsive to their needs. This should include improved review and regular reporting to trustees to better inform decision making.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services Central Region (Acting)

8 May 2014

About the School

Location

Inglewood

Ministry of Education profile number

177

School type

Secondary (Years 9 to 15)

School roll

469

Number of international students

8

Gender composition

Male 51%, Female 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Pacific

15%

84%

1%

Review team on site

February 2014

Date of this report

8 May 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

December 2010

June 2006

September 2003