Glenview School (Hamilton)

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1 Context

Glenview School is a contributing primary school in a south western suburb of Hamilton. In the past two years the school has consolidated eleven teaching spaces into five innovative learning environments (ILEs). Whole staff professional development has focused on writing, especially for boys, teaching as inquiry, the teaching of mathematics, and the effective use of digital technologies.

2 Equity and excellence

The vision and valued outcomes defined by the school for all children are to 'cause their learning in a safe and happy environment'. BOB HERE is an acronym that summarises the school desired outcomes for children (Being Our Best) and the values of Honesty, Effort, Respect and Engagement.

The school’s achievement information shows that a proportion of Māori children achieve at and above the expected National Standard in mathematics and that this has improved over the past three years. In reading and writing, overall Māori achievement levels are below National Standards.

School data for other children in the school shows achievement in mathematics has improved in the past three years. Achievement levels in reading and writing are below national expectations. Girls continue to achieve at higher levels in literacy than boys.

Since the last ERO evaluation the school has responded directly to recommendations from the 2013 ERO report. The school has:

  • worked with teachers to develop 'the Glenview Tikanga' as a visual summary of the elements of effective teaching practice
  • developed learning progression criteria for reading, writing and mathematics based on The New Zealand Curriculum learning progressions
  • strengthened the appraisal system to incorporate teacher reflection and inquiry into practice informed by evidence from student achievement data. This process is reflected on the data walls in each syndicate area, where the achievement levels and progress of every child is visually displayed for the relevant staff
  • increased Māori representation in school leadership and on the teaching staff and board of trustees
  • provided for students from Years 3 and 4 onwards experiences of kapa haka
  • incorporated Māori values into 'the Glenview Tikanga'.

3 Accelerating achievement

How effectively does this school respond to Māori children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school has responded to some Māori children whose learning and achievement needs acceleration in mathematics. At the end of 2015, 79 out of 107 Māori children were at or above the National Standard for mathematics.

Currently, the school cannot show that it has been effective in accelerating the learning for priority Māori students in reading and writing. At the end of 2015, 66 of the 107 Māori children were at the National Standard in reading, and 60 in writing.

Teachers gather extensive achievement information for each Māori child, particularly during the first term. With the development of Innovative Learning Environments (ILEs), this information is shared with all staff at syndicate meetings where children at risk of not achieving equitable outcomes are clearly identified. Data walls provide effective visual sharing of achievement and progress information. School leaders provide a detailed summary of expected levels of achievement in reading writing and mathematics for each year level. Teams of teachers in ILEs work collaboratively to plan strategies and interventions to support Māori children with identified needs.

How effectively does this school respond to other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

A similar pattern applies to other children whose learning needs to be accelerated. The school has been effective in the area of mathematics for some children, but cannot yet show that it has been effective in accelerating the learning for priority students in reading and writing.

Teachers use extensive assessment information to identify the achievement levels of each child. This information is effectively shared and displayed in syndicate data walls. Priority children are clearly identified and teachers plan together for strategies and interventions.

The school has guidelines for the gathering of standardised assessment data and other evidence of learning at least three times a year for each child. Syndicates hold three-weekly cyclic meetings where children's assessment information in reading, writing and mathematics is shared and considered by teams of teachers. Senior managers work with syndicate team leaders to support school-wide moderation processes. Currently, the school is not involved in moderation processes between schools.

Senior leaders recognise that an important next step is to re-draft their progress targets to focus on improving educational outcomes for children most at risk, including Māori. These targets should align with expectations at syndicate and classroom level. This will strengthen the monitoring of, and timely response to, these children's progress. In addition, a review of the timing and use of current assessment tools should further strengthen the monitoring of children's progress, and evaluate the impact of strategies and interventions.

4 School conditions

How effectively do the school’s curriculum and other organisational processes and practices develop and enact the school’s vision, values, goals and targets for equity and excellence?

The school is working to embed recent initiatives, processes and practices to provide effective implementation of curriculum to meet targets and goals for equity and excellence.

All children, including those who need additional support with their learning, benefit from the settled, inclusive and affirming culture of the school. Teachers know their children well and successfully establish positive relationships with them. They are available to meet and have formal or informal conversations with parents/whānau for half an hour before the start of each school day. High levels of engagement are evident in classrooms. ILEs are providing the environment for several teachers to share responsibility for strategies and interventions for each child. These aspects of culturally responsive practice are building the platform for a more effective focus on accelerating the learning of Māori children.

The school has reviewed and strengthen a number of school systems that support children, especially those at risk of not achieving their potential. The recently created reception class provides a small settled home-like environment to nurture early learning and dispositions. This class consolidates the 'Here We Go' programme for welcoming children from early childhood education, and has particular benefits for children entering school with low levels of oral language. Children remain in each ILE for two years, meaning that potentially disruptive 'class transitions' are reduced. Children accompany their parents to student-led conferences when their achievement and progress information is shared and discussed.

The principal and senior leaders recognise that work still needs to be done to consistently embed, and realise the positive potential of recent initiatives such as ILEs, the Glenview Tikanga, partnerships for learning with students and parents/whānau and the effective use of digital technologies.

Whole school professional development and resource provisions in mathematics have strengthened the consistency and effectiveness of teacher practice. School leaders recognise that teaching practice in areas of literacy should be strengthened further, to consolidate recent professional development and to include the consistent building of productive partnerships for learning with students and whānau.

The principal and senior leadership team continue to provide, and model, strong professional leadership for the staff and school community with a focus on equity and excellence for all children. The team has built strong relational trust among staff which has supported the recent introduction of ILEs and more collaborative professional practice. Opportunities for leadership have been extended to syndicate leaders who play a pivotal role in supporting children, including Māori, whose learning needs to be accelerated. Senior leaders provide strong and effective support for teachers new to the profession.

Trustees effectively govern the school in the best interests of children and the community. They are well informed by senior leaders, and allocate resources to support strategies priorities such as professional development, digital technologies and other resources to support teaching and learning. The next step for the board is to review their charter targets to bring a clearer aligned focus onto those priority children, including Māori, whose achievement needs accelerating.

5 Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated
  • respond to the strengths, needs and interests of each child
  • regularly evaluate how teaching is working for these children
  • need to systematically act on what they know works for each child
  • need to have a plan in place to build teacher capability to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it.

Teachers are supported to build their capabilities and understandings, and curriculum delivery is well resourced. There is an increasing awareness of culturally responsive practice to affirm the language, culture and identity of Māori children. Internal evaluation is informed by evidence and focused on continual improvements to professional practice and educational outcomes for all children.

The main challenge that remains for school leaders is to ensure the sustained accelerated progress of children, who are at risk of not achieving equitable outcomes. This involves reviewing charter progress targets at the school level, and being specific about, and closely monitoring, the children's progress expectations at syndicate/ILE level. The professional practice descriptions in the Glenview Tikanga, including building productive partnerships with students and their parents/whānau, are not yet consistently evident throughout the school. Successful strategies for teaching and learning in literacy should be shared, so that effective practice in this curriculum area becomes consistent.

Action: The board, principal and teachers should use the findings of this evaluation, the Effective School Evaluation resource, the Internal Evaluation: Good Practice exemplars and the School Evaluation Indicators to develop more targeted planning to accelerate student achievement. Planning should show how processes and practices will respond effectively to the strengths and needs of children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated.

As part of this review ERO will continue to monitor the school’s planning and the progress the school makes. ERO is likely to carry out the next full review in three years.

6 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and Self Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions

  • attendance

  • compliance with the provisions of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014 

7 Recommendation

School leaders should review, and strengthen the monitoring of, student progress targets to bring a clearer aligned focus on children, whose achievement needs accelerating. They should consolidate the current initiatives and continually evaluate their effectiveness on improving education outcomes for children, particularly those most at risk. 

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer

26 October 2016 

About the school

Location

Hamilton

Ministry of Education profile number

1725

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

440

Gender composition

Boys 50% Girls 50%

Ethnic composition

Pākehā

Māori

Pacific

Other Asian

Other

60%

27%

4%

8%

1%

Review team on site

June 2016

Date of this report

26 October 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

April 2013

August 2010

October 2007



1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Glenview School is located in the south of Hamilton and provides an education for students in Years 1 to 6. At the time of this ERO review the school had a roll of 370 students of whom 101 identified as Māori. The school operates 17 classrooms, is well resourced and supported by its community and an active parent teacher association.

The school’s vision of ‘Being Our Best’ and the values of ‘honesty, effort, respect and engagement’ are well known to students and families and contribute to a calm and settled atmosphere for learning.

In recent years a new assistant principal has been appointed and the senior leadership team has been reorganised. The school is focused on improving teaching practice, raising student achievement and curriculum development. Teachers have benefitted from their involvement in long-term professional learning about mathematics teaching. This learning has provided a useful model for future professional learning in other areas.

The school has responded positively to the areas for development and review identified in the August 2010 ERO report and has a positive reporting history.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school is making effective use of student achievement information to support student learning. School systems support and guide teachers to gather appropriate achievement information, particularly in literacy and mathematics. This information shows that at the end of 2012, a significant majority of students was achieving at or above the expected National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. School leaders use this information to set targets to raise overall student achievement levels and to identify students who require additional support with their learning.

Trustees are well informed about school-wide levels of student achievement. They also receive comprehensive reports about the progress of students who participate in an extensive range of learning support programmes. These reports also help trustees to make appropriate resourcing decisions that support student learning.

Teachers make effective use of achievement information to develop and implement programmes that target individual students’ learning needs. In some classes students are able to talk confidently about their achievement levels and next learning steps. In addition, teachers closely monitor student progress to identify those achieving below expected National Standards and provide additional in-class support for these students.

Parents receive comprehensive information about their child’s achievement and progress through written reports and individual student portfolios. The growing learning partnership between the school and parents/ whānau is being supported by a recent initiative, which involves teachers working with students to develop and share their learning goals.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school curriculum effectively promotes and supports student learning. It has a strong focus on reading, writing and mathematics. The school is continuing to develop a model of learning that encourages students to ask questions and investigate aspects of their learning. This ‘inquiry model’ is being used in social studies, science and technology. Other features of the curriculum that promote and support student learning are:

  • programmes that assist children and their families to transition to school
  • opportunities for students to enjoy a wide range of sporting and cultural activities
  • regular trips and camps that explore the local and wider community and provide challenge for students
  • high-quality programmes for students who need additional help in literacy.

Positive relationships between teachers and students are an important feature of the school. There are some examples of high-quality teaching practice that effectively engage students in meaningful learning.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Māori students’ sense of belonging and identity at the school is promoted by kapa haka, te reo Māori signage and positive relationships with teachers. Achievement information shows that Māori students achieve at levels similar to their non-Māori peers in reading, writing and mathematics.

School leaders and ERO have identified that a next step for the school is to develop a plan to support educational success for Māori as Māori. This should involve effective consultation with Māori parents/ whānau and consider:

  • key Ministry of Education documents such as Ka Hikitia and Tātaiako
  • incorporating the tikanga of Tainui into the school curriculum.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance because:

  • the principal and assistant principals have a reflective, knowledgeable and well-informed approach to school leadership
  • there is a focus on growing professional leadership within the school
  • regular and ongoing self-review practices, including a robust teacher appraisal process have been developed and implemented
  • trustees have a wide range of skills and expertise, and are supportive of school leaders and teachers.

ERO and school leaders agree that the next step for the school is to develop and document a plan for school improvement for the next three years. It is important that trustees, teachers, whānau and students are involved in this development. Priorities include:

  • shared understandings for effective teaching practice
  • clear progressions for each subject area
  • links between strategic goals, school curriculum, teacher professional development and appraisal.

Attention to these priorities should assist the school to effectively sustain and improve its performance and strengthen self review.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services

Northern Region

26 April 2013

About the School

Location

Hamilton

Ministry of Education profile number

1725

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

370

Gender composition

Girls 52%

Boys 48%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Other

Samoan

Indian

63%

27%

5%

3%

2%

Review team on site

March 2013

Date of this report

26 April 2013

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

August 2010

October 2007

September 2004