Taumarunui High School

Education institution number:
169
School type:
Secondary (Year 9-15)
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
359
Telephone:
Address:

202 Golf Road, Taumarunui

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Taumarunui High School

Te Ara Huarau | School Profile Report

Background

This Profile Report was written within 14 months of the Education Review Office and Taumarunui High School working in Te Ara Huarau, an improvement evaluation approach used in most English Medium State and State Integrated Schools. For more information about Te Ara Huarau see ERO’s website. www.ero.govt.nz

Context 

Taumarunui High School is a co-educational secondary school, providing education through ‘big picture learning’ for students in Years 9 to 13. The established principal and deputy principal continue in their roles.

Taumarunui High School’s strategic priorities for improving outcomes for learners are:

  • effectively implementing the ‘big picture learning’ curriculum

  • continuing focus on foundation learning in literacy, numeracy and learning to learn

  • continuing focus on achieving NCEA qualifications and supporting learners to identify personalised pathways that lead to further learning or meaningful employment.

You can find a copy of the school’s strategic and annual plan on Taumarunui High School’s website.

ERO and the school are working together to evaluate to what extent teacher efficacy impacts on student outcomes with the view to improving learning outcomes for all.

The rationale for selecting this evaluation is:

  • the knowledge that teacher efficacy (dispositions and effectiveness) is critical to raising student achievement for equity

  • the school and Kāhui Ako are currently engaged in a wider improvement strategy which includes teacher efficacy along with other key foci (student agency, educational leadership and whānau engagement). Ongoing improvement in these school conditions will support improving learning outcomes for all.

The school expects to see:

  • improvement in teaching practice aligned to the school ‘teacher efficacy’ rubric

  • teachers who are consistently able to engage in effective teaching interactions and practices according to Rongohia te Hau indicators and outcomes data

  • improved student achievement in literacy, numeracy in Years 9 and 10 and in the NCEA Level 2

  • personalised pathways for every student that lead to further learning or meaningful employment.

Strengths

The school can draw from the following strengths to evaluate the extent to which teacher efficacy impacts on student outcomes with the view to improving learning outcomes for all:

  • an established school culture where everyone is open to learning and improvement

  • leaders who have established a ‘big picture curriculum’ along with clear expectations for teachers to guide practice

  • collaboratively developed systems and processes to support and measure the growth of teacher efficacy.

Where to next?

Moving forward, the school will prioritise:

  • analysis of a range of data to identify areas of improvement in teaching and learning and areas that still need development with the goal of improving student outcomes

  • the ongoing strengthening of teacher efficacy through the established cycle of identification of need, professional learning, mentoring and evaluation.

ERO’s role will be to support the school in its evaluation for improvement cycle to improve outcomes for all learners. ERO will support the school in reporting their progress to the community. The next public report on ERO’s website will be a Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report and is due within three years.

Phil Cowie
Director Review and Improvement Services (Central)
Central Region | Te Tai Pūtahi Nui

3 November 2022 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement.  educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Taumarunui High School

Board Assurance with Regulatory and Legislative Requirements Report 2022 to 2025

As of February 2022, the Taumarunui High School Board of Trustees has attested to the following regulatory and legislative requirements:

Board Administration

Yes

Curriculum

Yes

Management of Health, Safety and Welfare

Yes

Personnel Management

Yes

Finance

Yes

Assets

Yes

Actions for Compliance

ERO has identified the following area of non-compliance during the board assurance process:

  • renewal of police vets for non-teaching staff every three years.
    [s 104, Education and Training Act 2020]

The board has since taken steps to address the areas of non-compliance identified.

Further Information

For further information please contact Taumarunui High School Board of Trustees.

The next Board of Trustees assurance that it is meeting regulatory and legislative requirements will be reported, along with the Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report, within three years.

Information on ERO’s role and process in this review can be found on the Education Review Office website.

Phil Cowie
Director Review and Improvement Services (Central)
Central Region | Te Tai Pūtahi Nui

3 November 2022 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Taumarunui High School

Provision for International Students Report

Background

The Education Review Office reviews schools that are signatories to the Education (Pastoral Care of Tertiary and International Learners) Code of Practice 2021 established under section 534 of the Education and Training Act 2020.

Findings

The school is a signatory to the Education (Pastoral Care of Tertiary and International Learners) Code of Practice 2021 established under section 534 of the Education and Training Act 2020. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

No international students were enrolled at the time of the ERO review.

Phil Cowie
Director Review and Improvement Services (Central)
Central Region | Te Tai Pūtahi Nui

3 November 2022 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Taumarunui High School - 16/05/2016

Findings

Improving student achievement and engagement is a high priority. The school is better able to identify students requiring additional support and respond to their needs. Teacher practice, leadership and internal evaluation are continuing to strengthen as curriculum changes and monitoring processes are fully implemented.   

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Taumarunui High School is a co-educational secondary school. Two thirds of the 354 students are Māori, mainly from Ngāti Hauaroa, Ngāti Maniapoto and Ngāti Tūwharetoa iwi.

The school hostel, Moyle House, presently provides five days a week boarding for students. The school has six international students and one exchange student in 2016.

The June 2013 ERO report recommended the school continue to implement, monitor and review initiatives and developments to further improve its performance to meet the needs of students and raise achievement. Changes to the organisation and delivery of the school curriculum in 2015 have seen positive results in qualifications for senior students. The school continues to address barriers to accelerate student progress in Years 9 and 10, especially in numeracy.

The school is participating in two Ministry of Education (the Ministry) initiatives. Kia Eke Panuku: Building on Success promotes Māori enjoying and achieving success as Māori. This initiative is currently focused on building the capability of a change team before extending professional learning across the school. Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L) is in its fourth year of implementation. The principles of this initiative are demonstrated through the school’s focus on the ‘Four A’s’, attendance, appearance, achievement and attitude.

Recruitment of personnel is an ongoing challenge for trustees and school leaders. Some teaching positions are currently filled by staff with a limited authority to teach.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Leaders and teachers continue to strengthen the use of data to support consistently effective teaching and learning for students.

Many students enter school at Year 9, with low literacy and numeracy achievement. Literacy data from 2014 shows students in Years 9 and 10 make progress with some accelerating their achievement. At the end of 2015, many Year 10 students achieved close to or at age expectations. However, the number of students at risk of poor educational outcomes continues to be a concern.

Raising student achievement in numeracy is a priority. School data shows that students make progress in Years 9 and 10. However, accelerated progress is insufficient for many students to ensure they meet age or curriculum expectations. Teachers must improve the use of assessment tools and data to ensure teaching is focused on students' learning needs.

National Certificates of Educational Achievement (NCEAs) achievement at Levels 1, 2 and 3 has increased since 2009. Changes to the organisational structure of the senior curriculum has improved monitoring of student progress during the year, enabling curriculum directors and school leaders to identify individuals requiring mentoring or additional support. This impacted positively on NCEA results in 2015.

Percentages of students achieving NCEA Levels 1 and 3 are generally equal to schools of similar type and below students nationally. Level 2 achievement in 2015 was below schools of similar type.

NCEA qualifications achieved by Māori students are increasing at a greater rate than that of non-Māori. Percentages of Māori learners gaining NCEA Level 1 and 2 in 2015, were equal to or above schools of similar type. Although Maori NCEA Level 3 leaver qualifications are lower than schools of similar type and all students nationally, data shows achievement is improving.

Addressing the disparity in retention between Māori learners and other groups in the school remains a priority for the board to address. Between 2012 and 2014, the gap between Māori and other groups in the school remained at a similar level. The school reports that changes made to the senior curriculum in 2015, and improved NCEA Level 2 achievement for Māori students, is likely to have a positive impact on the retention of Māori learners in 2015.

School leaders set targets to improve student achievement. Some actions identify useful strategies aimed at raising achievement. School and curriculum leaders should revise current targets to focus on specific groups of students, especially those below achievement expectations. Deeper analysis of student data is required to enable specific actions to be developed matched to their learning needs.

Student achievement information reported to parents is appropriate. Most attend interviews with teachers to discuss the progress of their children. School leaders have previously consulted with parents and whānau about the usefulness of written reports. It is timely to undertake further review to gauge how well comments related to student progress contribute to meaningful learning partnerships.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Changes to the curriculum promote and support student learning, engagement and achievement.

School leaders and trustees are currently engaging with the community to review their collective vision for student success.

To promote improved achievement in Years 9 and 10 the frequency of literacy and numeracy lessons has increased. Inquiry learning has been introduced as part of the junior curriculum. Developing teachers' capability to facilitate inquiry and assess student achievement using this approach is ongoing.

Teachers reflect on outcomes from the senior curriculum and monitor student progress. Project-based learning has been introduced two days a week for senior students. They can choose practical contexts to match their learning and vocational pathway.

Comprehensive processes support student wellbeing and their pastoral needs. Organisational structures are well designed to identify, consider and respond to the needs of individuals. Students access suitable guidance and mentoring. Extensive partnerships with external agencies are accessed to ensure students are included and participate in education.

The quality of teaching must improve to support student engagement and build on achievement. In some classes, a range of well-considered strategies engage students purposefully in learning. However, variable practice needs addressing to promote better outcomes for students.

Processes and practices to build teacher capability require improvement. Professional learning groups for teachers have been reintroduced to explore current practice and discuss research. Capability of teachers to effectively inquire into the impact of their practice is developing. It is timely to strengthen leadership of teaching and learning to guide further improvement.

Implementation of the teacher appraisal process is in the early stage. School leaders should increase the observation and critique of practice and build teachers' knowledge of the evidence required to achieve the Practising Teacher Criteria.

Student attendance is improving over time. In 2014, an external audit recommended trustees and school leaders realign their attendance target to focus on Years 9 and 10, especially to raise the attendance of Māori students. The school should action this recommendation to bring about higher levels of student attendance.

Support for students identified with additional learning needs is appropriate. The learning support committee considers the level of intervention required and monitors the progress of individual students. External agencies are accessed when required.

Students identified with complex learning needs are effectively supported in the Independent Learning/Living Unit. The teacher in charge works closely with parents, whānau and families to plan and address the needs of learners. Some students are able to widen their learning experiences in mainstream classes.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Aspects of the school curriculum suitably reflect Māori students’ culture, language and identity. Māori performing arts, kapa haka, pōwhiri and bilingual teaching are available to students.

In 2015, the school began participation in a Ministry initiative to further develop the extent to which Māori students enjoy and achieve success as Māori. Continuing to implement changes to improve the cultural responsiveness of the curriculum and build teacher practice is ongoing through this initiative.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

Ongoing improvements in the key priority areas identified in the previous ERO report have positioned the school well to further develop teacher practice, leadership and internal evaluation practice.

Trustees receive useful information to guide their governance practice. Through strategic planning appropriate long term goals are identified. Trustees and senior leaders should strengthen the actions in their annual plan. Better alignment of actions to match planned goals should assist evaluation and build on effective practices over time.

Trustees, leaders and teachers have continued their focus on building a positive climate and tone in the school. Information gathered from a range of sources, including students, is reflected on regularly. Teachers generally develop positive relationships with students, promoting their purposeful participation in class and at school. Increasing levels of student satisfaction and inclusion remain as ongoing focuses for the school.

School leaders have developed common formats to support school and department planning and to review practice. Monitoring and guidance processes are appropriate. Strengthening the implementation and impact of these processes to further improve outcomes for students is needed. Improving the quality of information gained from internal evaluation should assist leaders, teachers and trustees to determine the effectiveness of curriculum development and make further improvements.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. At the time of this review there were six international students.

Comprehensive guidelines provide clear expectations for the care of international students. Teacher contact with individuals and host families is regular and responsive. Students make choices about their learning and inclusion in sports and cultural activities. A wide range of opportunities and pathways are available, including a comprehensive outdoor education programme. Improving annual reporting to the board should strengthen trustees' understanding about the quality of provision for international students.

Provision for students in the school hostel

The school hostel, Moyle House, is licensed for 47 students, seven days a week. It presently accommodates 19 boarders from Monday to Friday.

The hostel is operated by the board of trustees and managed by a hostel committee. The committee has representatives from the board, parents, students and hostel managers. The teacher in charge of the hostel and hostel manager have attested that all requirements of the Education (Hostels) Regulations 2005, are met.

Students, parents and whānau, receive clear, useful information about how the hostel operates. Suitable staffing ensures students’ needs are met. A family/whānau environment emphasises the development of students' living skills and self-management. Positive relationships between hostel staff, students and parents promote students' wellbeing.

The school should develop a schedule of refurbishment of hostel premises and facilities.

The hostel committee should report regularly to trustees to support their knowledge in relation to the quality of the provision for boarders.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Improving student achievement and engagement is a high priority. The school is better able to identify students requiring additional support and respond to their needs. Teacher practice, leadership and internal evaluation are continuing to strengthen as curriculum changes and monitoring processes are fully implemented.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

16 May 2016

About the School

Location

Taumarunui

Ministry of Education profile number

169

School type

Secondary (Years 9 to 13)

School roll

354

Number of international students

6

Gender composition

Female 52%, Male 48%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Other ethnic groups

63%

35%

2%

Special features

Independent Living Unit Resource Teacher: Learning and Behaviour Unit Alternative Education Class Trades Academy

Review team on site

February 2016

Date of this report

16 May 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

June 2013

March 2011

May 2007