Lakeview School

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School Context

Lakeview School in Masterton caters for students in Years 1 to 8. At the time of this review, the roll of 391 students includes 55% who are Māori and 8% of Pacific heritage.

The school’s overarching vision is for students to be engaged and empowered to achieve excellence. Eight learner qualities describe the Lakeview School learner.

In 2018, the school’s targets are for students in Year 3 and above to be achieving at or above their expected curriculum levels in reading, writing and mathematics.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • reading, writing and mathematics for students overall and for target students.

Schoolwide professional learning and development is focused on enhancing student engagement, self-management and creativity through building collegial approaches to assessment, planning and teaching.

Recent changes in staff have included the appointment of a new principal, deputy principal and two team leaders. There have also been changes of trustees.

The school is part of the Masterton (Whakaoriori) Kāhui Ako.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is achieving good academic outcomes for many of its students, with the majority of students achieving at and above expected levels in reading, writing and mathematics. Year 8 students who left Lakeview School at the end of 2017 were achieving well.

Pacific student achievement has steadily increased since 2015, with the majority achieving at and above expectations in reading, writing and mathematics at the end of 2017. There was 10% disparity between the achievement of Pākehā and Māori students in reading, writing and mathematics.

Overall achievement in writing and mathematics has been declining for all students, except Pacific students, over the past three years.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school accelerates learning for some students who need this, especially in reading with the majority of identified target students in reading in 2017 making accelerated progress. Less than half of target students in mathematics and writing made progress toward expected levels.

Leaders and teachers should increase their schoolwide focus on students whose progress needs acceleration and on deliberate teaching and assessment to track this progress.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Teachers know the children well. They identify each child’s learning needs and ways they may be supported with their learning. Students with complex learning needs are well supported, with assistance from appropriate external agencies. A new approach of tracking and monitoring student achievement has been introduced for 2018.

Students participate in their learning and teachers use deliberate teaching strategies to promote student engagement. Through the Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L) programme, leaders and teachers are focusing on a positive and settled tone in classrooms. Smaller senior class sizes, teacher aide support and consistent positive behaviour management practices have assisted this development.

Professional development for staff in 2017 and 2018 includes a deliberate focus on the ‘art of teaching’. This includes emphasis on students knowing about their learning, confidently expressing their ideas and making choices. Teachers are at different stages of development in promoting student agency in their practice. Teacher inquiry is an integral part of teacher development.

The overarching curriculum framework is under review. The current curriculum is appropriately underpinned by The New Zealand Curriculum and emphasises integration of learning areas within authentic contexts. Matrices in reading, writing and mathematics guide teaching and assessment. Students are able to participate in a wide range of enriching learning opportunities.

Promoting and valuing the language, culture and identity of Māori students has continued to be an area of focus since the August 2015 ERO report. A range of strategies and practices across the school and in classrooms support Māori students to learn in an environment that supports and affirms them as individuals and as Māori. Leaders recommend that the school continues to strengthen the cultural responsiveness of staff and rebuilds links with whānau and iwi. ERO’s evaluation confirms this direction.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

To better respond to the needs of students at risk of not achieving, trustees and leaders should:

  • refocus school targets on accelerated progress

  • ensure assessment is consistent and timely

  • analyse assessment information for individuals and groups of students.

This should better enable regular tracking and reporting about their progress.

Leaders seek feedback from staff when planning for future school direction. Increasing the connectedness and consistency of systems and processes across the school requires development. With the recent changes of leaders and trustees, ERO recommends that training for trustees and the new leadership team should be sought to develop shared understandings and build collective capacity and consistency.

There is an established culture of reflection on school processes. A next step is to establish a shared understanding of an evidence-based internal evaluation framework. This should enable leaders and trustees to understand the effectiveness of school systems and better inform decision making and resourcing.

Leaders and trustees have adopted a new, externally facilitated appraisal process. This should enable a more consistent and rigorous approach to developing staff capability and improving outcomes for students.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • a school curriculum that provides a wide variety of learning experiences for students

  • teachers’ knowledge of the children in their classes and responses to support their learning.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in increasing:

  • the connectedness and consistency of schoolwide systems and processes to support the school’s future direction and development

  • targeted planning to accelerate students’ learning, and support sustained lifts in overall achievement [ERO will monitor and discuss progress with the school]

  • internal evaluation processes and practices

[at the request of the school, ERO will provide an internal evaluation workshop for trustees and senior leaders.]

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in three years.

Patricia Davey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

27 June 2018

About the school

Location

Masterton

Ministry of Education profile number

1659

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

391

Gender composition

Male 54%, Female 46%

Ethnic composition

Māori 55%
Pākehā 35%
Pacific 8%
Other ethnic groups 2%

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

Yes

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

May 2018

Date of this report

27 June 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review August 2015
Education Review August 2012
Education Review June 2009

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Lakeview School is a Years 1 to 8 primary in Masterton. The roll of 446 includes 54% of students who identify as Māori and 8% of Samoan heritage.

Students, staff, families and whānau demonstrate a strong sense of belonging in the school. Cultural heritage is valued. Parents are important partners in their children’s learning and achievement.

The vision for students who are “engaged and empowered to achieve excellence” underpins all aspects of school life and is evident through relationships and interactions with students and whānau.

A culture of high expectations supports the holistic development of each student. A well‑understood and consistently implemented positive behaviour programme enhances learning outcomes for students. The school provides a high level of pastoral care and works with local agencies where appropriate.

Areas for development and review identified in the August 2012 ERO report have been actioned. The school has a good reporting history with ERO.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school effectively uses achievement information to support students’ progress and achievement.

Senior leaders use data to set appropriate achievement targets, plan professional learning and development (PLD) and identify future directions. Progress is closely tracked and monitored against expected outcomes. The school has identified the need to accelerate the progress and achievement of those most at risk of not achieving, including boys and Māori and Pacific learners.

Trustees receive detailed, useful information about student progress and achievement. The principal regularly reports progress against the school’s strategic goals. This is used to make well-informed decisions about resourcing and what ongoing support is needed.

Teachers use achievement data to respond to learners’ strengths and needs. They use a wide range of assessment tools and activities to inform their overall teacher judgements about students' achievement.

A model of teachers inquiring into their practice is developing. Ongoing reflection on teaching and learning ensures they cater for students’ immediate and changing needs. Continuing to embed and strengthen teacher inquiry should support accelerated progress and achievement of students.

Moderation practices are continuing to strengthen in assessment of reading and writing. Data walls have been developed to show student progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards in reading and writing. Teachers use these as a tool to track and monitor student progress and improve moderation and teacher judgements. The school plans to develop these practices in mathematics, across the school.

Sound systems and processes support the identification of students with special educational needs and the allocation of resources to support their learning. Appropriate programmes and initiatives are put in place. Progress is well tracked and monitored and the impacts of learning support are reported to the board of trustees. A next step is for teachers to continue to transfer successful teaching and learning strategies into their classroom practice.

Parents receive useful information about their child’s progress and achievement. In response to parent and whānau feedback, the school has redesigned student reports to parents to more clearly reflect progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Lakeview School’s curriculum promotes and supports students’ learning.

Staff and trustees have engaged their community to develop the school’s vision and values. Key competencies and the school values are highly evident.

There are clear expectations and guidance for teaching and learning, and programmes are well aligned with The New Zealand Curriculum. There is a sense of community and strong value is placed on establishing, building and maintaining purposeful parent and whānau relationships.

Students experience a broad curriculum with many rich opportunities to extend and enhance their learning. Te ao Māori perspectives are highly valued and are explicit in teachers’ practice, the learning environment and throughout the curriculum. Staff are building their capability in the use of te reo Māori.

The school draws on local and wider community expertise and skills to support learning. This guides the development of authentic teaching and learning programmes. A next step is to strengthen the documentation of these rich learning experiences school-wide to support ongoing implementation and consolidation of the school’s curriculum.

The promotion of Pacific language, culture and identity is developing, within learning programmes, targeted support programmes and building positive relationships with families. Senior leaders plan to further develop Pacific student success. Provision for English to Speakers of Second Languages (ESOL) is well managed.

Teachers use a range of effective teaching strategies to engage and support students in their learning. Teachers, and students with their peers, work collaboratively. There is an ongoing focus to develop student knowledge and understanding of their progress and next steps for learning.

There is a well-considered approach to promote a safe and positive school culture. The school is participating in the Positive Behaviour for Learning programme, which has provided a framework to support this work. Student engagement in learning has increased.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

There is a well-considered strategic approach to promoting educational success for Māori, as Māori. Being a culturally-responsive school is a goal within the charter.

Students learn in an environment that supports and affirms them as individuals and as Māori. A strong partnership between the school and Te Reka O Angitu (TOA), a whānau advisory group, has contributed to increased cultural responsiveness amongst leaders, trustees and teachers.

TOA continues to provide support and guidance for staff, including leading PLD and organising and promoting a variety of school events to strengthen whānau engagement. TOA plays a significant role in contributing to the strategic direction of the school.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

Senior leaders have complementary skills and work collaboratively towards the school’s vision and goals. There is a clear and well-articulated strategic direction with a focus on improvement. Strengthened review practices contribute to better outcomes for teaching and learning.

Trustees know their governance roles and responsibilities well. They make well-considered decisions that contribute to success for students, their families and whānau.

Senior leaders articulate high expectations for student learning and achievement and for teachers as professionals. They have developed sound communication strategies to support new initiatives to promote improvement.

Initiatives have been well implemented and it is now time to consolidate and embed these. Consolidation of practice should contribute to achieving the school’s goal to accelerate student progress and achievement in literacy and numeracy.

The newly refined appraisal process supports teacher growth and development. There is clear feedback that identifies strengths and next steps for teachers. PLD targets schoolwide priorities and individual teacher needs.

Parents, families, whānau and the community are welcomed and involved in school activities as respected and valued partners in learning.

The school and board have an ongoing cycle of review that identifies priorities for improvement, develops and implements plans, monitors progress and evaluates effectiveness. These processes are well understood and used to guide continual improvement.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Lakeview School is well placed to sustain and improve its performance. Students experience a broad curriculum with rich opportunities to extend and enhance their learning. Positive connections are made with parents and whānau to ensure school decision-making is in the best interests of students. Plans are in place to accelerate student progress and achievement.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

7 August 2015

About the School

Location

Masterton

Ministry of Education profile number

1659

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

446

Gender composition

Female 50%,

Male 50%

Ethnic composition

Māori 54%

Pākehā 36%

Samoan 8%

Other ethnic groups 2%

Review team on site

June 2015

Date of this report

7 August 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review August 2012

Education Review June 2009

Education Review June 2006