Marina View School

Education institution number:
1592
School type:
Full Primary
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
630
Telephone:
Address:

97 Marina View Drive, West Harbour, Auckland

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Marina View School - 11/06/2018

School Context

Marina View School is a large primary school located in West Auckland. The school caters for approximately 700 students from Years 1 to 8. The school’s stable roll reflects the wide cultural diversity of the local community. International students from Korea and China are enrolled at the school.

Marina View School is committed to the New Zealand Curriculum (NZC) vision for all children to be confident, connected, actively involved lifelong learners. The intention of the school motto “Learning for Life” is to engage children in purposeful and authentic learning. The school aims to support children to be effective learners, thinkers and communicators, and globally minded, resilient citizens.

The school has undergone some refurbishment since the previous ERO report. This includes improvements to classrooms, the administration area, and the outdoor environment.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • progress towards the school’s strategic goals and direction

  • the wellbeing of staff and students

  • the impact of professional learning and development opportunities for teachers and leaders

  • the achievement and progress of students who require accelerated learning

  • ways the school’s curriculum responds to diverse requirements.

Marina View School is a member of Te Whiria a Tangata Kahui Ako|Community of Learning.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all students very well. Most students, including Māori, achieve very well in reading, writing and mathematics. The school’s data show improvement over time in Māori student achievement. Parity in achievement between Māori and other students has been achieved in reading and writing. Improvement of Māori achievement in mathematics has lessened disparity in that area and is indicative of the school’s focus on achieving equitable outcomes.

Most Pacific students achieve very well in reading, writing and mathematics. Longitudinal data shows parity of achievement compared with other groups of learners in the school.

Students achieve very well in relation to other school valued outcomes. Children:

  • demonstrate caring relationships with adults and peers
  • collaborate with, learn from, and support the learning of others
  • display self motivation and regulation in their learning
  • are reflective and creative thinkers.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

Marina View School is accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need additional support very well. The school has taken purposeful, well considered measures to reduce disparity for Māori students in mathematics. The achievement of Pacific students has successfully been raised over time.

Responsive teaching approaches, focused interventions, and ongoing monitoring have resulted in improved achievement for target students. Boys’ achievement in writing increased in 2017 and achievement levels of Māori students in mathematics show a significant increase. The school monitors very well students whose achievement is at risk of falling behind their cohort group in order to adapt programmes and teaching practices.

Children with diverse learning needs respond well to individual learning plans and are well supported to make progress towards the school’s expected outcomes.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Te Tiriti o Waitangi underpins the school’s vision, values and strategic direction, with a particular school wide commitment to the principle of partnership. All students are affirmed in their language, culture and identity. The school has developed a culturally responsive practice plan, to support its strong bicultural focus. Teachers are supported through well considered external professional development and internal systems and leadership. Te reo me ngā tikanga Māori are woven through school programmes and interactions. Recent refurbishment of the environment has made the school’s bicultural commitment more visible through the use of te reo Māori in signage and artwork depicting a Māori worldview.

The leadership team work effectively and collaboratively. Leadership expertise promotes very good systems, practices and processes to improve teaching and learning. Leaders have established clarity and shared understandings, around the school’s goals, purpose and direction, that enable high level strategic thinking. Leaders and teachers make very good use of external expertise and connections, to build capability and sustain ongoing improvement and innovation. Relational trust at every level of the school supports collaboration, risk taking and openness to change.

Strong partnerships for learning have been established with the community, and globally through learning relationships with schools in Korea and China. Partnerships with parents and whānau are valued as the key to establishing positive outcomes for students. Strong tuakana-teina interactions enhance children’s learning.

Students participate and learn in caring, inclusive and collaborative learning communities that are strongly child-centred. Responsive teaching effectively supports and promotes student learning across the curriculum. There is a particular emphasis on supporting students to develop digital knowledge, technological fluency, and productive and critical thinking. The curriculum is personalised and based on children’s interests, needs and strengths. As a result, children are highly engaged and enjoy a breadth of learning opportunities.

Trustees have clarity around their roles and responsibilities. The board is well informed to support decision-making that is focused on improving outcomes for students.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

The board, leaders and teachers could now focus on enhancing collective capacity in evaluation, inquiry and knowledge building to sustain the very good innovation and improvements at all levels of the school.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016 (. At the time of this review there were eight long stay, and 22 short stay international students attending the school.

The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

ERO’s evaluation process confirms that the school’s internal evaluation processes are of very good quality.

The school provides international students with pastoral care processes of a high standard. They receive very good quality English language support. International students integrate well into the school’s educational programmes. They immerse themselves in all aspects of school and community life.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • high quality leadership practices that collaboratively develop and enact the school’s vision, goals and targets for equity and excellence

  • a culturally responsive focus that contributes to the school’s effectiveness in promoting positive outcomes for all students

  • leadership that builds relational trust and effective collaboration at every level of the school community

  • high quality professional capability among staff that supports effective teaching and learning.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • continuing to develop the quality of internal evaluation to build and sustain improvement and innovation through all levels of the school.

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in four-to-five years.

Julie Foley

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

Te Tai Raki - Northern Region

11 June 2018

About the school

Location

West Harbour, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1592

School type

Full Primary (Years 1-8)

School roll

725

Gender composition

Boys 51% Girls 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori 12%
Pākehā 37%
Chinese 21%
Korean 7%
Pasifika 6%
Indian 6%
other 11%

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

Yes

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

May 2018

Date of this report

11 June 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review July 2013
Education Review March 2010
Education Review April 2007

Marina View School - 29/07/2013

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Marina View School in West Harbour, Auckland, is a large school catering for students in Years 1 to 8. Teachers and students share a sense of pride in their school and their achievements. Students benefit from learning in a well organised, well maintained environment.

Significant building programmes undertaken since the 2010 ERO review provide additional specialised teaching areas to support the implementation of the school’s broad curriculum. Extensive new playgrounds increase opportunities for students’ play. The school roll is stable and reflects the local community. A small group of international students from Korea attend the school.

The 2010 ERO report identified high quality educational leadership and a supportive learning culture. These positive features are well embedded in school practice and continue to contribute to the purposeful and nurturing learning–focused environment. A senior leadership team with a clear vision for learning lead the school. They promote leadership opportunities for teachers throughout the school.

The school’s strategic direction is evident in school operations. Focused professional development by external facilitators, and support from school curriculum leaders, ensures teachers embed new learning about effective teaching practices.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school makes very good use of achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement. Students achieve well in reading, writing and mathematics in relation to National Standards.

Students are confident and positive members of the learning community. They are well engaged in, and focused on learning. Students describe their progress and achievement using a shared language of learning. They set goals for themselves and use self and peer evaluations, and meaningful feedback from teachers to monitor their progress.

Senior leaders have a broad view of student success. They hold high expectations of student achievement and teacher practice. Senior leaders support teachers well to be responsible and accountable for student progress. They work closely with teachers to ensure assessment and monitoring processes are good quality.

Senior leaders, in collaboration with teachers, set targets to promote achievement for groups of students. Teachers use information from formal assessments and their professional judgement to identify students’ achievement levels, including those who need extra support.

Teachers develop individual education plans for all students who are achieving below National Standards. Senior leaders closely monitor progress of students with special needs. Teachers collaborate effectively in teaching teams to promote learning for students who need to make accelerated progress. They use highly effective strategies to ensure students know what they are learning and what they need to do to achieve.

Teachers promote trusting relationships for learning with students. They share a sense of urgency with parents for accelerating student progress through positive home and school partnerships. Teachers report in writing on student progress and achievement in relation to National Standards to parents twice a year. The processes and formats used to report to parents are subject to ongoing review.

School leaders identify that teaching and learning could continue to improve by:

  • using student voice to explore the relationship between what teachers are teaching and what students are learning
  • increasing student awareness of their achievement in relation to the National Standards
  • using self-review processes to measure the effectiveness of initiatives to accelerate student progress.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum promotes and supports student learning very effectively. The school motto ‘Learning for Life’ is well understood and underpins the school’s curriculum.

Teachers identify several qualities that are desirable in a learner and that incorporate the key competencies of The New Zealand Curriculum. These qualities, along with the school values of curiosity, perseverance, respect, integrity and diversity, are understood and enacted by teachers and students throughout the school day.

The school curriculum has an appropriate focus on literacy and numeracy while encouraging the active involvement of students in a broad range of authentic, relevant learning experiences.

Teachers facilitate inquiry based learning organised into themes or big ideas. They use an integrated approach to ensure coherence of lessons and to develop understandings across contexts chosen by the teams. School leaders respect the integrity of learning areas such as science, by ensuring teacher content knowledge is developed, and by promoting ‘hands on’ learning methods for students.

The use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to engage students, and to support and extend their learning, is high quality and well established. Students benefit from a wide range of opportunities to research, create and present their learning across the curriculum.

Teachers provide a technology programme for students in Years 7 and 8. They use authentic, practical contexts for students to apply their knowledge and skills. These students explore real life business opportunities as part of their careers education. Senior leaders use the students’ own knowledge of themselves as learners to promote self-regulated learning.

To support further development of the school’s curriculum, school leaders intend to continue focusing on:

  • extending the integration of information and communication technologies (ICT) and twenty first century learning strategies across the curriculum
  • teachers increasingly using the inquiry process to challenge students’ thinking
  • exploring possibilities for incorporating aspects of te ao Māori in learning contexts.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school promotes educational success for Māori, as Māori, well. School leaders report against strategic goals for Māori achievement. Māori students achieve at the same level as other students in reading, writing and mathematics. The roll of Māori students has increased as more students who attend the school choose to identify their ethnicity as Māori.

Teachers are supported to develop their awareness of the impact of language, culture and identity on Māori student achievement. A group of teacher leaders provides leadership for te reo me ngā tikanga Māori lessons across the school. Years 7 and 8 students learn te reo Māori for their learning languages component of the curriculum. Teachers identify students with special abilities who could benefit from a programme of te reo Māori and carving.

Through formal consultation processes whānau provide direction for the school and offer support for programmes. The school’s kaumātua offers guidance to the board and the leadership team. A group of Māori students meets with senior leaders to help ensure aspirations of Māori students are known.

A useful next step could be to continue the development of a more progressive learning programme for te reo me ona tikanga Māori. This could support teachers and students to build confidence and self efficacy in this area.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

The board is well led. Trustees are knowledgeable and bring a variety of skills and expertise to their roles. They have a commitment to the school and the community.

Senior leaders are experienced and knowledgeable and provide professional leadership within the school. They have a clear philosophy for learning. This helps them make decisions that are aligned with the teaching and learning philosophy and the strategic plan. Senior leaders foster leadership in others.

School leaders have responded positively to the 2010 ERO report and are committed to ongoing improvement. The existing connection to the community has been strengthened by consultation with whānau Māori and Pacific students’ families. Students contribute ideas and information that help leaders make decisions.

Professional development facilitated by external providers contributes to the continuous learning expected of teachers. Curriculum leaders ensure teachers are supported to achieve expectations of teaching practice.

Teachers inquire into and extend their own practice by working together on areas of interest and school-wide goals. School leaders and teachers effectively review programmes and processes. Teachers and leaders use a capability framework to focus their personal reflections for improvement. It is important that the board of trustees review their own processes and performance to ensure they continue to challenge and seek improvement in ways that promote student outcomes.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. At the time of this review there were five international students attending the school.

The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code. ERO’s investigations confirm that the school’s self-review process for international students is thorough.

International students are well included in classroom programmes and school activities. They are well supported by a teacher who speaks the children’s home language.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

29 July 2013

About the School

Location

West Harbour, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1592

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

689

Number of international students

5

Gender composition

Boys 50% Girls 50%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Pacific

Chinese

Korean

Indian

African

Australian

British

Japanese

Other European

57%

9%

7%

9%

6%

4%

2%

1%

1%

1%

3%

Review team on site

June 2013

Date of this report

29 July 2013

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

March 2010

April 2007

April 2004