Waikowhai Intermediate

We maintain a regular review programme to evaluate and report on the education and care of young people in schools.

We are in the process of shifting from event-based external reviews to supporting each school in a process of continuous improvement.

There may be delays between reviews for some schools and kura due to Covid-19 and while we transition to our new way of reviewing.

Read more about our new processes and why we changed the way we review schools and kura.

Find out which schools have upcoming reviews.

Education institution number:
1548
School type:
Intermediate
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
405
Telephone:
Address:

Richardson Road, Mount Roskill, Auckland

View on map

Summary

Waikowhai Intermediate provides education for Year 7 and 8 students. Currently there are 361 children, with six percent of Māori descent and 24 percent from Pacific Nations.

The school has built on the very good practices noted in ERO’s 2014 evaluation report. Positive developments include greater partnering with whānau and families, and targeting programmes to accelerate children’s progress.

In 2016, the board successfully managed the school through school leadership changes. The new principal has established a wider team of capable senior leaders. This new leadership team works cohesively with dedicated trustees who have a keen understanding of stewardship.

The school’s multi-layered approach to raising achievement, supports learning equity and excellence for children. Effective school leadership, robust internal evaluation and strong community partnership underpin this work. The school’s data show that children engage well in learning. In the two years they attend Waikowhai, their progress is accelerated in reading, writing and mathematics.

The school is a member in the Lynfield Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako (CoL). School leaders have established pathways to build coherence and capability for the benefit of the children, the school and the wider CoL.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school responds very well to learners whose learning and achievement need acceleration. The board, leaders and teachers see lifting overall achievement as an integral part of school improvement. The school’s processes and actions are very effective in helping to achieve excellence and equity for children.

Children are achieving excellent educational outcomes. School performance has been sustained over time through well-focused, embedded processes and practices. This school has successfully addressed in-school disparity in educational outcomes.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years. 

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school responds very effectively to all learners whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

The school’s data show significant shifts in students’ achievement in relation to the National Standards, from when they enter school at Year 7 to when they leave at Year 8. A range of robust processes are in place for moderation across the school and with other schools in the CoL.

Children benefit from the board’s strategic approach to raising achievement. The school is addressing in-school disparity for Māori. In 2016, Māori students’ learning progress was accelerated in reading, writing and mathematics.

The school monitors Pacific students’ progress and responds with culturally appropriate interventions to accelerate their progress. This deliberate approach acknowledges the partnership of families, children and teachers, and the inclusion of culture in learning. It is also being used to accelerate mathematics learning for all children. The school is addressing in-school disparity for Pacific students. School data show a significant increase in the achievement of Tongan and Samoan students in all National Standards.

Culturally responsive teaching practices are supporting children to engage well in their learning. Specialist subject teachers are an integral part of the school’s learning community and contribute fully to the targeted actions to accelerating student progress. They also monitor children’s achievement outcomes through their targeted teacher inquiries.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school’s processes and actions are very effective in helping achieve excellence and equity for children.

The board demonstrates a strong commitment to fostering conditions for equity and excellence. Trustees are strategic in their approach to accelerating students’ achievement. Priority is given to enabling all children to access meaningful learning opportunities. This is achieved through very good use of resourcing and strong internal evaluation processes that ensure interventions support and strengthen outcomes for children.

School leaders have high expectations of themselves and of everyone in the school’s learning community. They lead and influence a professional teaching culture, committed to ongoing learning and improvement. All staff participate in quality mentoring and coaching programmes and comprehensive appraisal processes. Leaders and teachers carry out evidenced-based inquiries into the effectiveness of their practice, with the purpose of benefitting learners.

Internal evaluation is systematic and coherent, underpinning school improvement at every level. The community, board, leaders, teachers and students contribute to the school’s evaluations.

The school’s curriculum design is responsive to children’s culture, language and identity. Children experience a wide range of learning opportunities called the ‘Wai Way’, which is linked to The New Zealand Curriculum. They have many opportunities to engage in high level critical thinking and reflection. Personalised ‘learning maps’ reference each child’s progress, fostering student agency. These maps are shared with teachers and family. Children use school-issue computers very well for independent and collaborative learning.

Children respond well to school expectations and strive to succeed as learners and developing citizens. Manaakitanga, whanaungatanga and mahi tahi are evident throughout the school. Students’ wellbeing is a focus in the school. The school’s values are threaded through the curriculum, and are reflected in the very good outcomes achieved for students. These values are ‘diversity, excellence, equity, participation, innovation and inquiry, hauora, integrity, respect and sustainability’.

Leaders and teachers maintain useful partnerships between families, school and the community. Home languages are actively encouraged and used in the school, and at parent interviews. The school establishes relationships with agencies and networks to support equity of access for all children.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

The school is very well placed to sustain its current good practices and continue to make ongoing improvements that impact positively on equity and excellence for all children. Leaders and teachers continue to have a strong focus on eliminating disparity across the school, and the further development of children’s agency in their role as school decision makers.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Children are achieving excellent educational outcomes. School performance has been sustained over time through well-focused, embedded processes and practices. This school has successfully addressed in-school disparity in educational outcomes.

Agreed next steps are:

  • undertake an internal evaluation to align successful school wide initiatives that will further enhance the curriculum

  • continue implementing successful strategies to address disparity in achievement.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years. 

Violet Tu’uga Stevenson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

30 June 2017

About the school 

Location

Mt Roskill, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1548

School type

Intermediate (Years 7 and 8)

School roll

361

Gender composition

Boys 51% Girls 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Samoan
Tongan
Chinese
Indian
Other Pacific
Other Ethnicities

6%
46%
10%
10%
5%
5%
4%
6%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

May 2017

Date of this report

30 June 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Education Review
Education Review

February 2014
September 2010
May 2007

 

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Waikowhai Intermediate caters for students in Years 7 and 8. It is situated in Mt Roskill and the school uses some of the public grounds in the adjacent Sir Keith Hay Park. Students come from a wide geographical area; many are bilingual and come from diverse multi-ethnic backgrounds.

The school hosts a satellite class from the Carlson School (Cerebral Palsy) and provides facilities for a Gifted Kids programme, which some of school’s students attend.

Students do most of their learning in their home rooms. They also have access to specialist teaching and purpose built classrooms for science and subjects such as technology and the Arts. One day a week, students have opportunities to pursue areas of special interest to them.

The school has a positive ERO reporting history. Many staff are long serving and dedicated intermediate school specialists. They understand the significance and challenges associated with adolescence. Teachers have a positive approach to student management.

Teacher professional development is ongoing and is currently focused on writing, inquiry learning and integrating specialised subjects into homeroom programmes.

Since the previous ERO review in 2010, the library has been rebuilt and the school’s information and communication technology infrastructure has been improved. Senior leaders are considering how enhancing e-learning approaches and having students use portable devices might help modernise learning environments.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school effectively uses achievement information to make positive changes to learners' engagement, progress and achievement. Students are well engaged in school life and value opportunities to engage in a range of student leadership opportunities. The well organised classrooms and clear expectations for student behaviour support a settled school tone.

Very effective data tracking systems have been developed to closely monitor student progress and success. Student achievement information shows that while some students are below national standards in reading, writing and mathematics, their rates of progress are beginning to accelerate. Māori students succeed at levels above other groups in the school. It would now be useful for the school to set more specific achievement targets to continue to support their achievement.

Pacific students’ achievement is now consistent with national levels of Pacific achievement. However, Pacific boys’ achievement in mathematics and writing remains a concern. School leaders are well placed to deepen their analysis of successes and to evaluate achievement patterns and trends over time. Documenting approaches that are proving most successful for teaching writing is underway.

The board funds specialised reading and language programmes for over half the school. Teachers are expected to build on these programmes through their classroom planning. There is some evidence that these initiatives are helping students succeed. The board and school leaders should now:

  • comprehensively review the sustainability and success of this approach
  • strengthen teaching practice so that teachers can meet students’ specific learning needs in their homeroom programme
  • evaluate how well the content of teaching programmes connects with the learning in the classroom.

Teachers use achievement information well to target the learning needs of groups of students and individuals. Students with additional learning needs, including gifted and talented students receive good support. Teachers, students, families and other specialists work together to set individual goals aimed at promoting each of these student’s wellbeing and achievement.

Teachers have implemented national standards well. Robust achievement information provides a basis for school decision making. Students are aware of their achievement levels and what they need to learn next. Teaching students how to evaluate and select evidence of their own learning to share with others could be a next step. Reports to parents are increasingly helpful and teachers’ efforts to write in plain language is supporting the development of learning partnerships with families.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school curriculum effectively promotes and supports student learning. The curriculum is well aligned to The New Zealand Curriculum (NZC) and places a significant emphasis on literacy and mathematics. The curriculum is underpinned by well resourced learning environments and good access to information and communication technologies.

Students experience a wide range of subjects and enrichment opportunities. Teachers are developing inquiry learning to promote students’ thinking skills and are working to integrate specialised subjects. Continuing to increase the challenge in learning tasks could further accelerate student learning.

ERO and school leaders agree that the curriculum could be enhanced if teachers strengthened:

  • the connection between the curriculum and students’ home languages and cultural knowledge
  • opportunities for students to design learning experiences and topics
  • the use of te ao Māori and Pacific perspectives across the curriculum.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school promotes educational success for Māori and has identified that further work is needed to foster students' success as Māori by further promoting their language, culture and identity.

Māori students’ achievement is monitored very well. They are currently achieving at above the level of other groups in the school, and ongoing work is needed to sustain school approaches.

Teachers are implementing a useful te reo Māori programme. They would benefit from professional development and Ministry of Education (MoE) support to build their capacity to be more confident with te reo and tikanga. The use of MoE resources and acting on recommendations from hui with whānau could also offer ways to strengthen biculturalism.

To promote success as Māori the school could consider:

  • defining and developing a school plan to promote success as Māori
  • using Ka Hikitia: Accelerating Success and Tātaiako resources to inform planning and self review
  • revisiting school policies and philosophy to better document the aspects of manaakiatanga and whanaungatanga that are evident in school practices
  • consider ways to sustain successful practices over time.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

A new three year charter is in place with key strategic priorities to guide future directions. Self review is effective and used to make positive changes. Review processes continue to develop and school leaders have recently documented a new self-review approach. Trustees and school leaders agree that developing a more evaluative self-review process using indicators could assist school leaders, trustees and teachers to reflect more deeply and comprehensively on developments.

School leadership is effective and thoughtful. There is a focus on developing leaders and empowering teachers. Senior leaders have high expectations and model professional leadership and learning. They make good use of external links and professional development.

Very good support is in place for beginning teachers and coaching and mentoring approaches support teacher development well. Performance management is thoughtfully designed and promotes useful teacher reflection.

The school effectively promotes and supports student wellbeing through well connected support systems. Staff demonstrate empathy for students and have developed effective approaches for noticing and responding to students’ needs.

Effective pastoral care and good relationships between students and teachers underpin the school’s respectful and settled culture. The board could now consider how best to allocate resources and to explore ways in which students might have more regular access to a qualified counsellor.

Transition to intermediate is well planned and monitored. As some families have long-standing connections with the school, many students connect readily with the new environment. Making successful transitions to secondary school is a priority for leaders and students. Senior leaders could seek a range of evidence from secondary schools to monitor and review how well this is working.

School governance is effective and the board comprises both newer and more experienced trustees. The positive relationship between the board and senior leaders supports the school’s focus on student achievement. Trustees have a useful range of skills and expertise to offer the school.

The board is well informed about student achievement and key steps to continue strengthening governance include:

  • enhancing the school vision and philosophy to include bicultural and multiethnic perspectives
  • developing more specific charter targets for groups of learners
  • seeking community input and evaluation on a regular basis
  • refining the school policy and procedure framework
  • receiving reports that evaluate progress towards meeting charter requirements and priorities, including reports on the success of specific interventions programmes.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. At the time of this review, there were no international students attending the school.

The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

ERO’s investigations confirmed that the school’s self-review process for international students is thorough. When reporting to the board orally, school leaders should ensure the evidence is documented with the attestation to show how the school meets the Code.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

During the course of the review ERO identified one area of non-compliance. In order to address this, the board of trustees must clearly distinguish between voluntary donations and fees in all school documentation, including invoices to parents and whānau.[Education Act 1989, s3/MOE Circular 1998/25, 2013/06].

To improve current practice, the board should also ensure that school personnel management policies are updated to include reference to the registered teachers’ criteria.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

25 April 2014

About the School

Location

Mt Roskill, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1548

School type

Intermediate (Years 7 to 8)

School roll

392

Number of international students

0

Gender composition

Boys 50% Girls 50%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Tongan

Samoan

Indian

Chinese

Other Pacific

Other Asian

Other European

Other

11%

41%

12%

10%

9%

3%

4%

2%

2%

2%

Special Features

Carlson School (Cerebral Palsy) satellite class Gifted Kids Charitable Trust satellite class

Review team on site

February 2014

Date of this report

25 April 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

September 2010

May 2007

August 2003