Waiau Pa School

Education institution number:
1547
School type:
Full Primary
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
314
Telephone:
Address:

571 Waiau Pa Road, Waiau Pa, Pukekohe

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Waiau Pa School

Te Ara Huarau | School Profile Report

Background

This Profile Report was written within eight months of the Education Review Office and Waiau Pa School working in Te Ara Huarau, an improvement evaluation approach used in most English Medium State and State Integrated Schools. For more information about Te Ara Huarau see ERO’s website. www.ero.govt.nz

Context

Waiau Pa School is located in a rural environment in Waiau Pa, near Clark’s Beach. The school provides education for students in Years 1 to 8.

Waiau Pa School’s strategic priorities for improving outcomes for learners are based around:

  • Believe – tamariki who believe they can achieve personal excellence across the curriculum.

  • Belong – tamariki who take pride in knowing they belong to their community and the wider world.

  • Become – tamariki who become empowered, future-focused learners.

You can find a copy of the school’s strategic and annual plan on Waiau Pa School’s website.

ERO and the school are working together to evaluate the effectiveness of strategic actions to further improve outcomes for students in writing, with a focus on equitable outcomes for boys. Strengthening evaluation practices and improving rates of student attendance are ongoing priorities for the school.

The rationale for selecting this evaluation is:

  • the school’s ongoing commitment to achieving equity and excellence for all students.

  • the opportunity it provides to further strengthen consistency of teaching practice and build students’ engagement and ownership in their learning journeys.

  • the importance of strengthening collective capability in evaluation for continuous improvement.

The school expects to see planned actions implemented to increase attendance, enable improved rates of progress and equitable outcomes for boys in writing.

Strengths

The school can draw from the following strengths to support its goal to further develop evaluation capability for raising student outcomes:

  • leadership of learning that is reflective, open to change and focused on continual improvement.

  • comprehensive systems and practices that identify and support progress for students with additional needs.

  • differentiated learning programmes that are responsive and inclusive to the needs of tamariki.

Where to next?

Moving forward, the school will prioritise:

  • implementing targeted actions to improve attendance, increase learner progress and enable equitable outcomes for boys in writing

  • further developing learner agency to empower students to strive towards reaching their potential

  • strengthening evaluation capability to inform planning and teaching for continuous improvement.

ERO’s role will be to support the school in its evaluation for improvement cycle to improve outcomes for all learners. ERO will support the school in reporting their progress to the community. The next public report on ERO’s website will be a Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report and is due within three years.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

26 October 2023

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement.  educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Waiau Pa School

Board Assurance with Regulatory and Legislative Requirements Report 2023 to 2026

As of August 2023, the Waiau Pa School Board has attested to the following regulatory and legislative requirements:

Board Administration

Yes

Curriculum

Yes

Management of Health, Safety and Welfare

Yes

Personnel Management

Yes

Finance

Yes

Assets

Yes

Further Information

For further information please contact Waiau Pa School, School Board.

The next School Board assurance that it is meeting regulatory and legislative requirements will be reported, along with the Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report, within three years.

Information on ERO’s role and process in this review can be found on the Education Review Office website.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

26 October 2023

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Waiau Pa School - 28/02/2019

School Context

Waiau Pā School is a full primary school catering for students in Years 1 to 8. It is located in Waiau Pā near Clark’s Beach.

The school encourages students to believe, belong, and become. The schools’ agreed values of respect, inclusion, care and honesty are promoted. Skills for learning such as making connections, taking risks, asking questions, persevering and reflecting are valued.

A new principal and senior management team started at the beginning of 2018. The board continues to be led by an experienced chair, with a mixture of old and new trustees.

The school is a member of the Rosehill Community of Learning | Kāhui Ako.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, school-wide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • reading, writing and mathematics.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is achieving excellent outcomes for some of its students.

The school’s achievement information for 2017 shows that most students are achieving at or above expected levels in reading and mathematics, and a large majority in writing. Disparity has been reduced for boys and Māori in mathematics and for Māori in writing since 2016. Significant disparity has remained consistent over time for boys and Māori in reading, and for boys in writing.

There is a small number of Pacific students at the school. Up until 2017 the majority of Pacific students were achieving at or above expectations in reading, writing and mathematics. In 2018 slightly less than half of Pacific students were achieving at or above expectations in writing and mathematics.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school is accelerating the progress of some Māori and other students who need it.

Interim 2018 data shows effective acceleration for Māori students in reading and writing. In mathematics about one quarter of students at risk of underachieving made accelerated progress in 2017 and 2018. Data collated during the onsite stage of the ERO review shows that approximately one third of students at risk of underachieving made accelerated progress in reading and writing in 2017.

Students who require additional support make appropriate progress in relation to their individual goals.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

The new leadership team is developing a clear strategic direction for improvement. Leaders are developing strong collaborative relationships with all stakeholders to ensure their perspectives and aspirations are incorporated in the school’s goals and targets. They support teachers and facilitate ongoing professional discussion about improving student progress and achievement. Leaders have a well-considered approach to managing change.

Students participate and learn in a caring, collaborative learning environment. Relationships between teachers are respectful. Agreed school values are well-promoted in classes and school-wide, and understood by students. Senior leaders actively promote agreed expectations and a consistent approach to behaviour management, with a focus on restoring relationships. The new leadership team has developed an open, inclusive approach to special needs education. Students’ diverse languages, cultures and identities are celebrated. Those who need additional support are carefully identified, and programmes and interventions are responsive to their needs.

The promotion of learning skills for life facilitates the development of life-long learning. Parents of Māori students spoken to by ERO report that the school is beginning to enact their aspirations in relation to tikanga and te reo Māori, which are visible in the school. Extensive professional development in writing aligns with identified trends and patterns in student achievement data. Students who are achieving below expectations are well identified and their progress tracked. A broad range of opportunities enable students to develop confidence, leadership skills and experience success.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Leaders now need to:

  • further strengthen the management and use of student assessment data to report on rates of progress (expected and accelerated) for at-risk learners
  • inquire more deeply into teaching practice to identify strategies making a difference for learners, and the effectiveness of programmes and interventions.

Teachers need to:

  • to empower students to take more responsibility for their learning, by developing knowledge of their own learning and next steps

  • develop greater consistency of targeted planning and feedback to accelerate learning for at-risk students

  • review the curriculum document with a focus on developing a local perspective.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • leadership that collaboratively develops clear directions for improvement

  • a learning environment that is respectful and inclusive

  • a broad curriculum that provides many opportunities for students to experience success.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • reviewing the collation and use of assessment data to focus on accelerating the progress of those at-risk of underachievement

formative assessment teaching practice to enable students to become self-managing learners

  • localising the curriculum to reflect community priorities and emphases

  • targeted planning to accelerate learning.

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in three years.

Phil Cowie

Director Review and Improvement Services

Te Tai Miringa - Waikato / Bay of Plenty Region

28 February 2019

About the school

Location

Waiau Pā, Hunua, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

Waiau Pa School 1547

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

361

Gender composition

Boys 55% Girls 45%

Ethnic composition

Māori 16%
Pākehā 79%
Pacific 2%
Other 3%

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

Yes

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

November 2018

Date of this report

28 February 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review September 2015
Education Review April 2012
Education Review November 2008

Waiau Pa School - 24/09/2015

Findings

Students at Waiau Pa School engage purposefully in learning and benefit from a broad curriculum. The school’s set of learner traits and values support students to experience success as learners. School governance and leadership is effective and learning partnerships with parents are valued. These features contribute positively to students’ wellbeing and learning.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Waiau Pa School, in the Franklin district, caters for Years 1 to 8 students. Positive and supportive relationships between staff and students contribute to a settled school tone that is focused on learning.

The 2015 celebration of the school’s establishment 125 years ago signifies the deep and enduring bonds between the school and its community. Some members of the board and staff were past students. School events are well supported by parents and community members. Their contributions to the life of the school are valued by the board and staff.

The school’s 2012 ERO report noted its good quality learning culture, governance and leadership, and staff collaboration. These positive features continue to be evident. The school has made useful progress with some of the areas for development noted in ERO’s 2012 report.

Well considered professional learning and development (PLD) for teachers has had a positive impact on outcomes for students.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school uses achievement information well to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement.

Students are very engaged in their learning. They confidently contribute to classroom discussions and support each other by providing feedback about their ideas, successes and areas for improvement.

Students reflect on how they have achieved their personal goals. They confidently discuss their progress and achievement with their parents and whānau. Most students are achieving at and above the National Standards for reading, writing and mathematics.

School achievement information for 2014 shows increased numbers of students achieving at and above National Standards. This positive trend is indicative of the school-wide development of teaching strategies that are focused on students’ diverse learning requirements. Teachers use achievement information well to plan programmes to cater for students’ individual needs.

The board should now form achievement targets that are evidence-based and emphasise student outcomes. A focus on raising achievement would align well with the board’s focus on student progress and contribute to the school’s ability to meeting the government’s 2017 National Standards targets.

School leaders and the board work collaboratively to raise the achievement of students who have traditionally not achieved to their potential. Well analysed and regularly reported achievement information helps the board identify where to allocate additional staffing and resources to support these students’ learning requirements.

Students who achieve below the National Standards are supported by a variety of programmes that cater for their diverse learning requirements. Since the 2012 ERO review, senior leaders have supported teachers to use achievement information to accelerate student progress by modifying teaching and learning practices to suit the requirements of individual students. This good process supports students who achieve below National Standards to make accelerated progress.

School consultation with parents about written reports has resulted in clearer information about their children’s learning, progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards for reading, writing and mathematics. Parents and whānau find that the information helps them to understand and contribute to their children’s learning and next steps.

Thirteen percent of the school population identifies as Māori. While most Māori students achieve at and above the National Standards, overall they achieve at lower levels than their non-Māori peers in the school. The board and senior leaders have identified ways they can build on partnerships with whānau to focus on raising achievement levels. They have considered ways to use achievement information to identify and establish targets for Māori students who are not achieving at expected levels.

Pacific students represent two percent of the school roll. They achieve at comparable levels to their school cohort.

Students with special learning needs benefit from the school’s inclusive culture. Appropriate intervention programmes are implemented with parent/whānau involvement. These students are involved in the everyday life of the school.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum promotes and supports student learning well.

Students are confident, capable learners. They have a strong sense of their identity and make decisions about how they can contribute to the life of the school. Students represent and advocate for themselves and others. Teachers support students to develop skills, knowledge and social capabilities in their academic, sporting, social and cultural endeavours. The school’s set of values and learning traits are well understood by students and are used to support their learning.

Teaching practices affirm students’ wellbeing and promote their empathy for others. Teachers provide opportunities for students to develop and experience leadership in a variety of meaningful ways. They support students to transition successfully to their next year level, and to their next school.

School leaders, teachers and trustees are committed to promoting modern learning practices (MLP). They support teachers to share each other’s effective teaching practice through school-wide professional learning and development opportunities. As a result of MLP, students enjoy increasing opportunities to be “authors of their own learning.”

Students confidently use digital devices to support and extend their learning. Teachers report that student engagement in learning has increased as a result of using these devices, particularly for students who have found writing difficult. Through sharing documents electronically, senior school students have opportunities to seek feedback and ideas from classmates and their teachers.

Student wellbeing is promoted by the school’s inclusive culture. School leaders, teachers and trustees demonstrate team work and open enthusiasm about school and learning. Education outside the classroom experiences continues to be valued by the school, students and parents. The school and community’s calf club day is a highlight in the annual calendar.

Key areas for development include:

  • assessing student achievement and progress in learning areas such as science and social sciences
  • exploring ways to build students’ knowledge and understanding of the bicultural heritage of the local area
  • continuing to refine school evaluation practices to drive and promote MLP.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school’s promotion of bicultural approaches is increasingly evident in the curriculum. Māori are acknowledged and respected as tangata whenua. Classroom environments reflect aspects of Māori language and culture.

Senior leaders, teachers and trustees acknowledge the need to raise overall Māori student achievement. It is timely that the board and school leaders review the provision for Māori students and whānau to ensure consistently high quality outcomes for Māori students. A sequenced te reo Māori programme would contribute to these positive outcomes.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

Collegial relationships among staff support their professional growth. Teachers work collaboratively to plan and ensure positive outcomes for students. An effective performance management system supports teachers in their ongoing development. Senior leaders and teachers are receptive to new ideas. Staff use digital devices effectively to collaborate and plan for students with diverse requirements. They have enthusiastically adopted strategies that are designed to accelerate student progress.

The school continues to be well led by school leaders. High levels of professional trust enable teachers to be innovative and contribute to school direction. Experienced teachers lead initiatives that are focused on what is best for students.

The board has a good balance of experienced and newly appointed members. Trustees are very supportive of the principal and staff. They have a clear understanding of their role and focus on improving student learning. Good stewardship is evident in the way the board works strategically and collaboratively to achieve the school community’s vision, values, goals and priorities. The school’s strategic plan, annual plan and policies align well and contribute to positive outcomes for students.

The board coordinates a variety of approaches to support sustainability by:

  • conducting mid-term trustee elections
  • using feedback from the community to inform school direction
  • accessing relevant board training.

The school’s strong partnerships with parents, whānau and community benefit students’ wellbeing and learning. Students are secure in the knowledge that their interests and welfare are upmost in adults’ hearts and minds. Trustees and school leaders plan to explore ways that these partnerships can be further enhanced, particularly with the parents/whānau of Māori and Pacific students.

The school’s focus on developing teaching and learning practices suited to modern learning environments would be supported by self review. School leaders, teachers and the board could review how the school might more effectively:

  • provide students with choice in their learning
  • use student outcomes to determine charter targets and drive school developments
  • align The New Zealand Curriculum principles to the school’s goals and direction.

The enhancement of self-review processes that are focused on positive student outcomes could further consolidate and embed school developments.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Students at Waiau Pa School engage purposefully in learning and benefit from a broad curriculum. The school’s set of learner traits and values support students to experience success as learners. School governance and leadership is effective and learning partnerships with parents are valued. These features contribute positively to students’ wellbeing and learning.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

24 September 2015

About the School

Location

Waiau Pa, Pukekohe

Ministry of Education profile number

1547

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

349

Gender composition

Boys 54% Girls 46%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Asian

Pacific

other

13%

82%

2%

2%

1%

Review team on site

July 2015

Date of this report

24 September 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

April 2012

November 2008

December 2005