Te Papapa School

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Education institution number:
1534
School type:
Contributing
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Bilingual Year 7 and Year 8 School
Total roll:
293
Telephone:
Address:

219 Mt Smart Road, Onehunga, Auckland

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School Context

Te Papapa School caters for approximately 300 students from Years 1 to 8. Students are predominantly of Māori or Pacific heritage. Those students choosing bilingual education in Te Rito, the Māori class or Le Manumea, the Samoan class, continue their learning to the end of Year 8.

The school has a strong commitment to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi and an inclusive culture that celebrates the diversity of families in the local community.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • achievement in reading, writing and mathematics
  • progress towards the school’s strategic targets
  • Māori, Pacific, and English language learners’ progress and achievement
  • programmes and interventions designed to support additional learning and behavioural needs
  • progress, trends and patterns of achievement for priority students
  • student attendance, engagement, and wellbeing.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

Leaders and teachers have a relentless focus on achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all students. The 2019 achievement data indicate that almost all students achieve at national curriculum expectations in reading, writing and mathematics. Since 2015, the achievement information indicates a consistent pattern of improvement for all Māori and Pacific students in literacy and mathematics.

Over the past four years there has been a trend of continuous improvement for boys in literacy. Girls’ high achievement in literacy and mathematics has been sustained. Achievement for students in Te Rito and Le Manumea is comparable to other groups of students.

Students achieve very well in relation to other school valued outcomes.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school is highly effective in its response to those Māori and other students who need to make accelerated progress. The achievement data indicates sustained acceleration for students and groups of students who require this. Over the past four years the school has been successful in increasing parity for boys in literacy.

Schoolwide achievement information shows that most children who need to, make accelerated progress in literacy and mathematics. Some students, including English Language learners and transient students, enter the school not achieving at expectation. School achievement data show that over time many of these students make accelerated progress in literacy and mathematics.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Leaders promote a positive school culture based on respect and collaboration. They actively promote practices that focus on students’ engagement and wellbeing. The value placed on and respect for children’s cultural heritage promotes an environment in which both adults and children have a strong sense of place and belonging.

Leaders and teachers have high expectations. Children are empowered to be leaders of their own learning. Leaders and teachers collate meaningful evidence to evaluate students’ achievement and progress. They purposefully design a range of targeted interventions and actively promote strategies to accelerate learning. Teachers and leaders continue to build their capability to identify and measure capabilities and competencies of bilingual students.

Teachers plan and deliver a broad and responsive curriculum. They use a variety of teaching strategies to engage and motivate students. Teachers are well supported by school leaders to implement teaching and learning strategies that respond to the learning needs and strengths of individual, and groups of children.

New learners of English receive highly effective support to enable them to make accelerated progress. Teachers scaffold programmes and use appropriate assessment resources to inform their planning.

A coherent approach supports students with additional needs to make progress in relation to their individual goals. These students feel accepted, enjoy positive relationships with their peers and teachers and are active, visible members of the learning community. Students build social and emotional competencies to help them to be successful learners.

Community collaboration and partnerships with whānau and families extend and enrich opportunities for students to become confident and connected learners. Te Reo Māori me ōna tikanga is highly visible throughout the school. Children learn about the dual heritage of Aotearoa New Zealand through authentic learning experiences. Leaders and teachers are successfully embedding culturally appropriate and responsive approaches.

School leaders, trustees, staff, whānau and families have sustained their focus and effort on achieving equitable outcomes for all children. Decision making is based on the effective use of data and best-practice evidence. Staff regularly participate in meaningful and purposeful professional learning and development. This builds collective capacity and positively impacts on outcomes for children.

The school has committed trustees who actively support the school. Trustees and school leaders focus on initiatives that support equitable and excellent outcomes for all students. Comprehensive and cohesive internal evaluation processes and practices are in place to ensure ongoing improvement.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

The school has the capability, systems and processes to continue working towards achieving equitable outcomes for students.

Senior leaders have identified relevant areas for further school improvement. They will:

  • further develop teachers’ understanding of bilingual education to maximise learning
  • continue to design, plan and implement a curriculum responsive to students and whānau aspirations.

3 Board Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Children’s Act 2014.

4 ERO’s Overall Judgement

On the basis of the findings of this review, ERO’s overall evaluation judgement of Te Papapa School’s performance in achieving valued outcomes for its students is: Strong.

ERO’s Framework: Overall Findings and Judgement Tool derived from School Evaluation Indicators: Effective Practice for Improvement and Learner Success is available on ERO’s website.

5 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • highly effective leadership that promotes equity and excellence
  • evaluation, inquiry and knowledge building to sustain improvement
  • a professional, capable and committed teaching staff and culture
  • inclusive and responsive environments that support students’ learning and wellbeing
  • promoting cultural and linguistic responsiveness
  • community collaboration and partnerships.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in continuing to:

  • further develop bilingual education
  • extend the curriculum to further reflect community aspirations and students’ interests.

Steve Tanner

Director Review and Improvement Services Northern

Northern Region

23 April 2020

About the school

Location

Onehunga, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1534

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

306

Gender composition

Boys 51% Girls 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori 30%
NZ European/Pākehā 2%
Tongan 28%
Samoan 15%
Cook Island Māori 6%
other Pacific groups 6%
other ethnic groups 13%

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

Yes

Provision of Māori medium education

Yes

Review team on site

November 2019

Date of this report

23 April 2020

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review December 2014
Education Review January 2012
Education Review November 2008

Findings

Te Pāpapa School provides an inclusive learning environment that promotes student achievement and wellbeing. The school’s curriculum effectively responds to students’ needs and interests. School leaders seek improvement through effective ongoing school review and consultation. The engagement of family and whānau in learning partnerships contributes to successful outcomes for students.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Te Pāpapa School is located in the Auckland suburb of Onehunga and caters for students from Years 1 to 6. Students are mainly of Pacific (73%) and Māori (23%) descent. Samoan, Tongan and Cook Island are the school's predominant Pacific groups. The school has made ongoing progress and improvement since ERO’s 2011 review.

The school has a strong commitment to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi and an inclusive culture that celebrates children’s diverse backgrounds. The involvement of families and multi-agency collaboration supports children’s learning. Teachers have the skills and expertise to support children with special learning needs and those with English as an additional language.

The principal’s leadership over the past six years has positively transformed the school. Supported by a collaborative management team, the principal has maintained a persistent focus on children’s learning and achievement. Approaches to teaching and learning are cohesive and well understood.

The school is an asset in the local community. The buildings and grounds are maintained to a high standard. Children’s work personalises classroom and school displays. The gardens and trees provide an attractive setting. Parents and whānau are made welcome and work together with teacher aides to support learners.

A major innovation since 2011 has been the establishment of an early childhood education centre on the school site. This facility has strengthened the school’s partnership with its community. Stable leadership provided by school leaders and trustees contributes to well selected initiatives that are impacting positively on student engagement and achievement.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Students are highly engaged in their learning. They make good progress and generally achieve well. Students work collaboratively with their teachers and their parents to understand their own learning. As a result, they are able to establish and review personal learning goals.

Teachers are very skilled in the use of achievement information. They collect reliable information about student achievement and meet regularly to monitor student progress. Achievement information is used to set targets for all students in relation to the National Standards. There is a particular focus on students who are currently achieving below expectations. Teachers are implementing successful approaches to bring about accelerated learning. Analysis of data is used well to determine programme overviews and daily learning intentions.

The principal oversees school-wide student progress and achievement. She and the school’s senior leaders examine achievement information critically and work with teachers to help ensure students’ learning needs are met. Parents receive very good information about their children’s learning, progress and achievement through conferences and written reports. School data is also compared with data from similar schools locally, regionally and nationally. This helps the board and leaders to measure progress and to monitor the wider effectiveness of Te Pāpapa School in progressing student learning.

The principal and senior leaders have been strategic and intentional in the use of initiatives to give added value to children’s learning. Initiatives that are bringing about positive changes to learner’s engagement, progress and achievement include;

  • extra staff to provide professional coaching for teachers

support for the very effective parent partnership programmes, such as Mutukaroa, HIPPY, Little Learners, Reading Together and the twice a term mathematics workshops with parents.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum supports student learning very effectively.

Curriculum review has been purposefully targeted to respond to students’ identified learning needs and interests. Learning programmes are designed to foster literacy and numeracy in a framework of inquiry-based learning. Students contribute to the selection of topics and explore learning through questioning, reading, writing, sharing and presenting information. Teachers interweave children’s home language, culture and identity within daily teaching and learning programmes.

The school’s culture and values promote success for all students. Well managed programmes and in-class support for children with special learning and behaviour needs is a feature of the school curriculum. The school-wide programme for positive behaviour promotes students’ engagement in learning. Positive relationships and restorative practices enhance students’ wellbeing, self worth and sense of belonging.

Consistent standards of teaching practice have been achieved through the complementary skills and shared expertise of curriculum leaders who work together with classroom teachers. Literacy and numeracy leaders collaborate with the special needs coordinator and team leaders. Professional learning groups provide opportunities for teachers to discuss information that guides their planning. Teachers respond positively to the cultural needs of children.

The curriculum encourages students to become self managing and to take responsibility for their own learning. As students gain confidence as learners they can share their progress with each other and with their parents. Curriculum expectations are displayed in all classrooms. Students discuss their learning with their teachers and set goals related to their own rate of progress.

The curriculum is varied and fun. Programmes include sustainability and the environment, particularly relating to gardening and food production. Art, music, and cultural experiences such as pōwhiri are regular and planned events. Students also achieve well in sports, including swimming and team games. They participate with enthusiasm. Support by adults for the roles of tuakana and teina allows younger and older students help one another to learn.

Senior leaders are considering how the curriculum could become more future focused and could further broaden students' learning experiences. They are also exploring options for extending the use of e-learning. These are appropriate next steps in helping students to become lifelong learners.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school promotes educational success for Māori students as Māori very effectively.

School practices and procedures are based on the values of mana, manaaki and mahi tahi. Teachers are using Ministry of Education resource documents to develop a much deeper understanding of how to make a positive difference for Maori students.

Tikanga Māori is guided by mana whenua. School leaders consult regularly with whānau Māori and the wider Māori community. Students lead daily mihimihi, karakia and himene using the many different languages of the school community. Te reo Māori is proudly used throughout the school. As a result, there is increased engagement with whānau, Māori students are achieving well, and there is a strategic goal to reinforce options for the learning of te reo Māori. At this school, tikanga Māori is the norm.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is very well placed to sustain and maintain its performance.

There are clear and shared understandings of expectations, school vision and direction. School leaders foster a culture of self reflection, improvement and innovation. They have managed change effectively over recent years. The principal is an experienced and capable professional leader, who promotes high expectations for staff and students. School leaders promote collaborative practice and are building the leadership capacity of all staff across the school. They are leaders within many professional networks where they share their innovative practices.

The board of trustees supports the school’s focus on student achievement well. It is led by an experienced chairperson and elected trustees. Co-opted representatives bring a wide range of skills and experience to the governance role. They share a strong commitment to effective partnerships with parents and whānau. The board’s strategic plan is closely aligned to school operations, and school leaders use high quality self review to evaluate progress towards the annual goals and targets.

Reflective practice and decision making that is focused on continual improvement are evident at all levels of the school. A range of formal and informal reporting practices ensure that the board is well informed. The principal regularly reports against the school’s goals and targets. School leaders and trustees communicate and consult with the community well. They use information from parents, staff and students to inform strategic decisions.

Sound foundations have been established and the school is well positioned to continue refining its governance, leadership and teaching practices. The board is considering ways to strengthen its strategic planning processes to ensure ongoing improvement and sustainability.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Te Pāpapa School provides an inclusive learning environment that promotes student achievement and wellbeing. The school’s curriculum effectively responds to students’ needs and interests. School leaders seek improvement through effective ongoing school review and consultation. The engagement of family and whānau in learning partnerships contributes to successful outcomes for students.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services

Northern Region

19 December 2014

About the School

Location

Onehunga, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1534

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

260

Gender composition

Boys 53% Girls 47%

Ethnic composition

Maori

NZ European/Pākeha

Tongan

Samoan

Cook Island

Niue

other

26%

1%

26%

25%

12%

5%

5%

Review team on site

November 2014

Date of this report

19 December 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

January 2012

November 2008

September 2005