Sunnybrae Normal School

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School Context

Sunnybrae Normal School caters for children in Years 1 to 6. Of the approximately 430 students on the roll, nine percent are Māori and eight percent have Pacific heritage. Children with Asian heritage, mostly Chinese and Korean, comprise 40 percent of the roll. This student group has increased significantly since ERO’s 2013 external evaluation.

The school’s vision of ‘a connected community of positively engaged learners|he hapori rangitāmiro ō ngā ākonga pai whai wāhi’, is designed to support students’ confidence and involvement in their learning and wellbeing. The school’s values: respect|whakaute; independence|motuhaketanga; cooperation|pahekotanga; and excellence|hiranga, underpin this vision.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • the progress of groups of priority learners in relation to school targets that are focused on raising achievement in reading, writing and mathematics

  • the achievement of all students in relation to the National Standards, and other learning areas

  • the quality of provision for children with additional learning needs

  • student engagement and wellbeing.

Schoolwide professional learning and development (PLD) initiatives have focused on increasing staff capability to lift achievement levels for learners who are at risk of not achieving. Culturally responsive teaching and learning practice has been integral to much of this PLD.

Sunnybrae Normal School is a part of the Pupuke (Westlake) Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako (CoL). The CoL has a focus on improving student learning and wellbeing outcomes, including strengthening pathways for learners, into and beyond school.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is highly effective in achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students. Most students achieve National Standards for reading, writing and mathematics. Māori children achieve at similar levels to the rest of the school. The school is aware that work needs to continue to accelerate the learning of some Pacific students.

Students achieve very well in relation to other school valued outcomes. Most students:

  • are involved in their learning, and actively contribute to the life of the school

  • have a strong sense of belonging and connection to others in the school community

  • use school values to support their positive interactions with others

  • are caring of others and respect their differences.

1.2 How effectively does this school respond to those Māori and other students whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school responds highly effectively to those Māori and other students whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

School targets are focused on accelerating the progress of all groups of children, including Māori and Pacific learners. Progress towards these targets is monitored by school leaders and the board. The tracking of other students who are below the National Standards shows positive shifts in achievement for the majority of these students.

Individual Pacific students are well supported to accelerate their progress. Key initiatives to overcome disparity in achievement include early intervention programmes, successful transitioning and a strategic staff appointment. These approaches are producing positive outcomes for Pacific learners. They are also benefitting other groups of learners who are at risk of not achieving.

High quality provision for children with additional needs supports them to make progress in their learning and wellbeing. Focused teaching approaches successfully respond to these students’ specific learning requirements. This positive facet of school operations has influenced and informed ways that the school provides for other groups of students whose learning requires acceleration.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school has many processes and practices that are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence. High quality school leadership inquires into ways teaching and learning practice can be enhanced to cater for children’s diverse learning requirements. School leaders support staff to accelerate children’s progress, for those students who are at risk of not achieving, and for those whose learning warrants extension.

Several significant school processes contribute to students’ progress and success as learners. Teachers identify students’ strengths, interests and learning needs in order to develop acceleration plans to cater for their specific learning requirements. Effective teaching and learning practices support children to succeed, and actively contribute to their learning pathway. Teachers provide all children, from their foundation years at school, with achievement information that informs them how well they are progressing, and supports them to plan their own next learning steps. Staff knowledge of individual students helps with transitions into the school, and from one year to the next.

A broad curriculum enables children to engage and succeed at school. Programmes are well integrated, and support children’s overall learning and development. As a result of a recommendation in the 2013 ERO report, the profile of te reo and tikanga Māori across the school has been enhanced. This development has contributed to children and staff having an increased understanding and appreciation of New Zealand’s dual heritages. Māori students benefit from programmes and interactions that provide opportunities for them to experience success as Māori.

The strong partnership the school has with parents, whānau and the community supports the school’s ongoing focus on improved outcomes for children. Trustees, school leaders and staff respect the aspirations of parents/whānau, and their role in their children’s success as learners. They provide good opportunities for parents to understand their children’s learning and progress.

Trustees use well-analysed and evaluated information to prioritise decision-making. They seek clarification about achievement information, and affirm actions that are focused on enabling the achievement of equity and excellence. The school’s moderation processes for assessing students’ progress and achievement in reading, writing and mathematics are rigorous. Teachers work collaboratively to check that their overall judgements are reliable.

Since ERO’s 2013 external evaluation, continuity in leadership and stewardship has contributed to successful ongoing school review and improvement. Evaluative practice is well developed and informs next steps for school leaders and staff, and for school direction. The board has well-considered plans to sustain the school’s high quality practices over time.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence?

Ongoing refinement of the school’s curriculum will contribute to an enhancement of current very good practices. The refreshed school curriculum could provide increased opportunities for students to construct knowledge, make meaning, and apply understandings to everyday situations.

Consistent with very good evaluative practices school-wide, the board could evaluate how well its own operations support the school’s ongoing efforts to strengthen its cultural responsiveness in relation to different groups of students and their families.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to theEducation (Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016(the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

At the time of this review there were two international students attending the school.

Sunnybrae Normal School has high quality systems to maintain the quality of both education and pastoral care for international students. Their achievement and progress are well monitored. International students are well integrated into the educational, community and cultural experiences offered by the school.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • collaborative leadership that supports equity and excellence for all learners and provides the means to accelerate the progress of children who are at risk of not achieving

  • connections and partnerships with parents, whānau and community that are focused on improving children’s learning and wellbeing

  • processes that support teachers to inquire into, and adapt their practice to cater for children’s diverse learning requirements.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, development priorities are in:

  • embedding a school curriculum that enhances students’ identity and builds on their capabilities and interests

  • enhancing evaluation processes at all levels to support all learners who are at risk of not achieving.

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in four-to-five years.

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

Te Tai Raki - Northern Region

13 December 2017

About the school

Location

Hillcrest, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1516

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

433

Gender composition

Boys 53% Girls 47%

Ethnic composition

Pākehā
Māori
Chinese
Korean
Indian/Sri Lankan
Tongan
Middle Eastern
other Pacific
other Asian
other ethnicities

30%
9%
20%
9%
5%
5%
4%
3%
6%
9%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

October 2017

Date of this report

13 December 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Education Review
Education Review

May 2013
May 2010
January 2007

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Sunnybrae Normal School is a contributing primary school located in Hillcrest, on Auckland’s North Shore. The school is inclusive and welcoming and caters for a wide range of student needs. The school’s community is culturally diverse. As a Normal School, the school provides a partnership with universities to give student teachers a model of sound, current and effective teaching practice.

This cohesive, well organised school is focused on improvement. The school vision reflects the board’s commitment to providing students with opportunities to engage in high quality learning.

The capable senior leadership team works collaboratively with the experienced staff, many of whom have long-term affiliations with the school. The parent community is actively involved in the school’s calendar of events and contributes to the development of the school curriculum.

The school has a history of positive ERO reviews and has responded well to the recommendations of the 2010 ERO report. The development of robust self review, at all levels, has continued to enhance teacher practice, student achievement, and school leadership capability.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school uses achievement information effectively to make continued improvements in learners’ engagement, progress and achievement. Managers and teachers have relevant data that indicates most learners are progressing and achieving at or above National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Māori and Pacific students are achieving at levels similar to those of other learners. School-wide targets are set for priority groups of students who need particular additional assistance to make progress. Parents receive two written reports each year that show their children’s achievement in relation to the National Standards.

Students are actively engaged in learning programmes. They think about how they learn as well as about what they learn. Formative teaching processes support students to access their own learning. Students show how they are taking responsibility for their own learning during conferences with their parents and teachers.

The board uses achievement information to make informed decisions about resourcing, in particular for targeted priority groups and special needs provision. The coordination of learning programmes and transitions for students with high level special needs is effective and has a positive impact on students’ progress and achievement. Gifted and talented students are well catered for.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Sunnybrae Normal School’s curriculum promotes and supports student learning very effectively. The school curriculum is closely aligned to The New Zealand Curriculum (NZC). The school values of respect, independence, co-operation and excellence are explicitly taught and are reflected in school programmes. Students’ acquisition of key competencies is given a high priority in teaching and learning plans.

Strong collaborative teams lead the curriculum. Learning areas are integrated to maximise student learning. The teaching of literacy is aligned to the inquiry topics that are being investigated by each Year level of students. Parents are utilised as curriculum experts to support some of the inquiry investigations. E-learning is developing strongly as part of the inquiry programme. Inquiry learning is planned using a framework that supports children to be able to think and learn in depth about their areas of interest. Students develop an awareness of issues related to environmental sustainability.

Teachers are committed to continually improving their practice through professional learning and development. They reflect on their teaching so that they can identify learning strategies that work most effectively for specific groups of learners identified through school data analysis. School managers encourage teacher leadership of the curriculum.

Students are highly involved in co-curricular activities that are supported by community involvement. These include specialist arts, cultural, musical and sporting opportunities.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school promotes achievement success for Māori students, who benefit from the affirming relationships that characterise the school. Effective practices for teaching and learning engage Maōri learners.

An education plan for teaching te reo Māori is being developed. Māori students extend their knowledge of te reo and tikanga Maori through integrated curriculum investigations that include aspects of te ao Māori. Students have opportunities to participate in kapa haka and perform at local festivals and community events.

A whānau group is consulted by school leaders, teachers and board of trustees about their aspirations for Māori students.

Senior leaders recognise that the school could show its commitment to biculturalism more clearly by raising the profile of te reo and tikanga Māori across the school. An increased understanding of New Zealand’s dual heritages would be of benefit to all learners.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

Sunnybrae School is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance. Coherent self review is centred on improving student outcomes. Perspectives are sought from leaders, staff, students and community to support internal review.

A close reciprocal relationship between principal, school leadership and board trustees ensures shared understandings of the ways in which the school is developing. Governance and board decision-making is well informed.

The long-standing, experienced principal is respected and is connected positively with the community.

Growing teacher leadership within a supportive team culture is a key aspect of school success and sustainability. The appraisal system for teachers is aligned to the improvement of student learning through individual reflection and team strategising, particularly in relation to students who are at risk of not achieving.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1998. No international students were enrolled at the time of the ERO review.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

20 June 2013

About the School

Location

Hillcrest, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1516

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

390

Number of international students

0

Gender composition

Boys 55% Girls 45%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Chinese

Korean

Filipino

Tongan

Indonesian

Japanese

Other Pacific Islands

Other

41%

11%

13%

11%

4%

4%

2%

2%

2%

10%

Special Features

Normal School

Review team on site

May 2013

Date of this report

20 June 2013

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

May 2010

January 2007

December 2003