Pukekohe East School

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Education institution number:
1450
School type:
Contributing
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
152
Telephone:
Address:

137 Runciman Road, Pukekohe

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Summary

Pukekohe East School is a semi-rural primary school for students in Years 1 to 6. The current roll of 168 includes, 17 Māori and a small number from Pacific and Asian cultures. The school roll has grown in recent years and the number of Māori children has increased.

Since the previous ERO review in 2012 the principal and management team have remained the same.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school’s is responding well to children whose learning is at risk.

There are many processes that are enabling the achievement of excellence and equity.

Further development is needed in school-wide targeted action to accelerate the achievement of identified groups of learners.

At the time of this ERO review the significant majority of all children were achieving at or above National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. This school has successfully addressed disparity in educational outcomes for Māori children over the last three years.

Children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

ERO and the school agree that the next step is to continue to enrich the school’s curriculum to reflect:

  • current thinking and shifts in practice

  • valued student outcomes expressed in the vision

  • whānau aspirations and ideas for promoting and enriching culture, language and identity.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is responding well to Māori and other children whose learning is at risk.

Data gathered and reported by the school in 2016 showed that the significant majority of all children, including Māori achieved at or above National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Māori children are achieving as well as other children in the school in reading, writing and mathematics in relation to National Standards. The school has implemented effective strategies and practices that have addressed the achievement disparity for Māori children over the last three years.

The school’s achievement data shows that during 2016 nearly all children working below the expected National Standard in reading, made accelerated progress. While achievement of boys overall is similar to girls in reading and mathematics, it is below in writing. A more targeted, school-wide approach to address this disparity is being developed and implemented.

The school gathers achievement information using a range of appropriate tests and strategies. This data, along with additional information gathered by teachers is used to make judgements about each child’s achievement in relation to National Standards. Across-school moderation processes are robust and contribute to dependable judgements. The school values the potential of its involvement in the Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako. This will enable teachers to share and reflect on assessment and moderation practices with teaching colleagues in other schools.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

There are many processes that are enabling the achievement of excellence and equity.

Leadership of learning is effectively creating conditions that promote equity and excellence for all children. There is a strong culture of professional learning, shared leadership and collaboration that leads to common understanding of, and consistent use of effective teaching strategies across the school. This leadership of learning is contributing to equitable opportunities for all children to experience success and strive for their personal best.

The school has well-embedded systems and practices for internal evaluation. Ongoing monitoring enables the impact of the curriculum, school processes and practices to be evaluated and modified when needed. Well-developed internal evaluation is effectively growing the school’s collective capability to focus school improvement on achieving equitable outcomes for all children.

Teaching as inquiry processes are well established. These processes are robust and lead teachers to identify and share the most effective strategies for accelerating children’s progress.

Leaders and teachers have established and documented clear and shared understandings about effective teaching practice and expected learner outcomes across the curriculum. The curriculum actively engages children in innovation, inquiry, sustainable practices and promotes self belief and strategies for them to develop as confident, self-managing learners.

The school effectively engages families and whānau in reciprocal learner-centred relationships. These productive learning partnerships support equitable and excellent outcomes for each child.

Trustees are well informed about children’s achievement. This ongoing and informative reporting enables trustees to make timely and responsive resourcing decisions that support equitable outcomes for children.

Teachers have a well-developed understanding of effective assessment practices. Their skilled interpretation of data informs planning and teaching to address individual learning strengths and needs, and to make reliable judgements about achievement in relation to National Standards.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Further development is needed in school-wide targeted action to accelerate the achievement of identified groups of learners.

The school recognises that enriching the school’s curriculum to support the achievement of equity and excellence is a next step.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014. 

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

ERO and the school agree that the next step is to continue to enrich the school’s curriculum to reflect:

  • current thinking and shifts in practice

  • valued student outcomes expressed in the vision

  • whanau aspirations and ideas for promoting and enriching culture, language and identity.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Waikato / Bay of Plenty

30 May 2017

About the school 

Location

Pukekohe

Ministry of Education profile number

1450

School type

Contributing Primary (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

168

Gender composition

Girls 57% Boys 43%

Ethnic composition

Pākehā 83%
Māori 10%
Asian 4%
Niue 1%
Other European 1%
Samoan 1%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

March 2017

Date of this report

30 May 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review – September 2012
Education Review – August 2009
Education Review – September 2006



1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Pukekohe East School is a small rural school for students from Year 1 to 6. The school currently has seven classrooms. A significant number of students travel from Pukekohe township to attend the school. An active Playcentre located on the school boundary helps many children to make a smooth transition to their first year at school.

The 2009 ERO report noted that the new principal created an immediate, positive impact on the school. Since this time the principal has built on early initiatives to further improve learning outcomes for students.

An inclusive and supportive culture is evident in the school. The principal promotes high expectations for respectful behaviour and consequently students enjoy positive relationships with each other and with teachers. Senior students are good role models for their younger peers and students of all ages are actively involved in lunch time activities together.

Since the 2009 ERO report the board has overseen building projects, such as a new library, that are improving learning facilities. The school is well resourced and well maintained. The board and staff benefit from a loyal community of parents who want the school to thrive.

There is a positive tone in the school that supports the learning of all students. Students, teachers and parents all value being members of the school community and display a strong sense of pride.

2 Learning

How well are students learning – engaging, progressing and achieving?

Students are engaged in learning. Teachers support student engagement by providing settled learning environments and by giving students specific and constructive comments about how well they are learning. Teachers have high expectations for student learning. Classroom environments celebrate students’ work.

School achievement information shows that students, including Māori and Pacific students, are achieving well in reading, writing and mathematics in relation to the National Standards.

The school uses achievement data very well to support student learning. There is clear reporting of student achievement by senior leaders to the board. The information is used to set annual school achievement targets and school priorities. The board, principal and teachers monitor student progress closely against these targets.

The analysis of achievement data is well used by teachers to plan for the different learning abilities of students in classroom programmes. School information shows that students make good progress and that the progress of some students is significantly accelerated. Students participate in learning forums to discuss their learning and next steps with their teacher and parents. Parents receive two written, plain language reports that show how well their child is achieving against the National Standards over the year.

The school has effective programmes and interventions in place to support students with special learning needs. Education plans and goals are developed for each child with special learning needs and progress is closely monitored. Teachers are supported by a well trained teacher aide who works with groups of students on independent activities. Students who would benefit from extension are also identified and the school offers programmes that provide students with opportunities to develop their talents.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school curriculum is well designed and documented. The curriculum captures the aspirations and values of staff and community and there is a shared ownership for its implementation. The school curriculum document provides good guidance for teachers for planning teaching and learning programmes.

Learning programmes for literacy and mathematics have priority in the school curriculum. Education outside the classroom (EOTC) is also a focus with learning opportunities provided at all year levels. Contributions from the community are evident in the other learning programmes, such as The Arts and environmental studies.

The school’s inquiry model supports students to explore their interests and investigate their own questions within predetermined learning contexts. This inquiry learning approach and strategies for e-learning are shaping future curriculum developments.

Good quality teaching practices are evident across the school. Teachers share professional practice and display a sense of collegial responsibility for raising student achievement. School systems support teachers to be reflective and responsive to meeting the diverse needs of students.

Teachers are well placed to work towards becoming facilitators of student learning as a way to further improve learning outcomes for students. Teachers could consider the extent to which they create opportunities for students to make independent decisions about their learning. They could also provide opportunities for student voice in planning the curriculum.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Good progress is being made to promote educational success for Māori, as Māori.

Currently twelve of the students at the school identify as Māori. Māori students have positive attitudes to school and learning. They benefit from the positive relationships that underpin the school culture and from the educational and leadership opportunities available to support their learning.

Maōri students value the increasing inclusion of aspects of Māori culture and language in the environment, learning programmes and school practices. These opportunities celebrate the bicultural backgrounds of the school’s Māori students and contribute to all students’ knowledge.

The principal and staff have made good use of the Ministry of Education’s Māori Education Strategy, Ka Hikitia: Managing for Success, as a tool for reviewing how well school policies and practices develop the potential of all Māori students. The cultural competences for teachers of Māori learners are beginning to be introduced into the school’s performance management systems.

The principal consults with the school’s Māori families individually. ERO suggests that the board continue to explore ways to strengthen engagement with whānau and iwi. Further engagement of the Māori community would allow them to have greater levels of involvement in supporting positive learning outcomes for Māori students.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

The leadership of the school is highly effective. The principal provides strong professional leadership. Her clear plan for implementing the school’s vision means that it is evident in practice. The principal has established clear lines of communication and manages the pace of school improvement initiatives successfully. The principal is well supported by an experienced senior leadership team that take a lead in the improvement of classroom curriculum programmes.

The board is effective in governing the school. They are well informed about curriculum matters and student achievement. Board decisions focus on improving student learning outcomes. The work of the board and senior leaders is well coordinated through the school’s comprehensive strategic and operational planning process.

Self review is used well to sustain and improve the school’s performance. There is a culture of critical reflection, led by the principal and board. Outcomes of self review provide clear rationale for curriculum design, teaching practice, and future directions for the school.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Makere Smith

National Manager Review Services Northern Region (Acting)

17 September 2012

About the School

Location

Pukekohe

Ministry of Education profile number

1450

School type

Contributing

School roll

158

Gender composition

Boys 51% Girls 49%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

British

Indian

South African

Other ethnicities

73%

9%

4%

4%

4%

6%

Review team on site

July 2012

Date of this report

17 September 2012

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

August 2009

September 2006

May 2003