Park Estate School

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Summary

Park Estate School in Rosehill, Papakura caters for students from Years 1 to 6. The school’s roll is culturally diverse and most are Māori. About one third of children have home languages other than English. A small number of children remain at the school for six years schooling.

The deputy principal was appointed to the role of principal at the start of 2017. She is supported by an acting deputy principal who has stepped up from a senior teaching position. The board of trustees is new although the current chairperson has been leading the board for almost three years. Most teachers and support staff are also new to the school, with three teachers being new to the teaching profession.

During the past three years, the school has accessed external professional learning to support children’s wellbeing, literacy and use of digital devices. Professional learning has also supported how teachers use achievement information and the school’s learning partnerships with parents.

The school is an active participant in a digital network cluster and is a member of the Papakura Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako (CoL). The CoL is recently established and is yet to set its achievement challenges.

The school has continued to make good progress since the 2014 ERO report, especially in areas of teaching and learning and governance.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school is achieving equitable outcomes well for Māori and all other children.

The board of trustees, senior leaders and staff have a strategic focus to promote equitable outcomes and plan well to meet the holistic needs of children and whānau. This planning includes professional learning to promote children’s wellbeing and learning. The board and leaders ensure that all children have equitable access to resources, including digital devices.

Teachers value knowing their learners and whānau. Their increasing use of restorative and child-centred approaches is making a difference to children being more settled and engaged in their learning. The school has a welcoming and inclusive ethos that values and promotes pride in Māori language, culture and identity.

Teachers and school leaders are increasingly partnering with parents and whanau about their children’s learning. They engage parents and whānau in hui and fono and are responsive to their ideas and opinions. As a result of these initiatives, parents are starting to request and respond to information about their children’s progress.

The board’s achievement targets prioritise Māori and Pacific children’s achievement. They are planning to re-vision the school in consultation with whānau to promote further opportunities for equity and excellence.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is effective in responding to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

School leaders and teachers make good use of achievement information to identify students whose learning needs accelerating. They meet regularly as a whole teaching team to discuss children’s progress and to share teaching strategies that promote engagement and have impact on children’s learning. Good internal and external moderation practices support the school to know that the judgements teachers make about children’s achievement area increasingly valid and accurate.

School leaders have implemented good processes to monitor learners’ progress. They identify and evaluate the impact that particular initiatives and programmes have on improving children’s learning. These good approaches are also used well for children learning English and for those who have specific learning needs.

The school’s varied and useful approaches are accelerating learners’ achievement in reading and writing. Mathematics achievement for most students in the school continues to be very good with around 80 percent of students achieving at and above the National Standard. Around two thirds of children achieve at and above in reading and writing.

The school’s data shows that girls’ achievement exceeds that of boys in all areas. Improving teaching practices to better support boys’ achievement is a particular focus for the school. Māori boys are identified as a specific group whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

School processes are increasingly effective in enabling the achievement of equity and excellence.

The principal and deputy principal are promoting collaborative leadership approaches and building the conditions for a trusting and positive school culture. Senior leaders are knowledgeable and open to learning. They are well organised and provide clear and well documented systems and processes that ensure consistency and accountability. Leaders recognise the skills and strengths of individual teachers and provide effective support and guidance for the teaching team.

There are clear expectations for teachers to enact a school curriculum that integrates the various learning areas, including literacy, maths and science. Teachers work collaboratively to plan learning programmes. They are reflective practitioners and use evidence to improve their practice. Teachers value professional learning opportunities that aim to promote positive outcomes for learners.

Some teachers provide very good opportunities for children to engage in challenging learning experiences. In these classrooms teachers promote collaboration and oral language that includes te reo Māori. Children have opportunities to choose what and how they learn. Some teachers make deliberate use of effective teaching strategies to engage and extend learners. These strategies include the improved use of digital devices.

The board of trustees is well led. Trustees bring varied skills and experiences to support their governance roles. They receive good information about student achievement and are dedicated to supporting the future direction of the school. Trustees and school leaders have a good understanding of internal evaluation as a tool for improvement. Strategic goals are well aligned to staff professional learning and appraisal. Along with school leaders, trustees have a clear vision for the school and are committed to achieving it.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

The board, school leaders and ERO agree that further developments for teachers include:

  • promoting and assessing the arts and health and physical education in the school’s curriculum
  • further strengthening culturally responsive teaching and learning approaches
  • continuing to promote student engagement in learning and learning partnerships with parents.

The board and school leaders are now keen to consult more meaningfully with their community about a new vision for the school. This would support school leaders as they continue to promote a positive school culture that builds children’s confidence, belonging and security.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Violet Tu’uga Stevenson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

20 September 2017

About the school

Location

Papakura, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1434

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

142

Gender composition

Boys 59% Girls 41%

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Samoan
Tongan
Indian
other Pacific

59%
9%
11%
9%
6%
6%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

May, 2017

Date of this report

20 September 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Education Review
Education Review

January 2014
June 2012
June 2009

1 Background and Context

What is the background and context for this school’s Arotake Paetawhiti review?

Park Estate School is located in Rosehill, Papakura, and caters for students from Years 1 to 6. The school reflects its ethnically diverse community and has a significant number of Māori students.

The 2012 ERO report highlighted concerns about the use of student achievement information, the school’s curriculum, and the need to increase opportunities for Māori students to succeed as Māori. For this reason ERO decided to continue to monitor the school's progress through a longitudinal review process. The principal, senior leaders, trustees and staff have worked very successfully with the Ministry of Education (MOE) and a MOE Student Achievement Practitioner (SAF) to address the agreed priorities for development in the school.

Trustees and school leaders agreed on ways to improve and created a development plan. They have worked systematically and collaboratively to address the key priorities.

A long-term programme of professional learning and development was initiated by the school prior to the 2012 ERO review. An external facilitator has been supporting school leaders and teachers to implement more effective teaching of literacy. An ongoing programme of professional learning is planned, using both internal and external expertise.

2 Review and Development

How effectively is the school addressing its priorities for review and development?

Priorities identified for review and development

ERO’s 2012 report identified the need to ensure ongoing improvement through:

  • implementing strategies to raise student progress and achievement in relation to National Standards
  • furthering success for Māori students in school programmes and practices
  • developing closer links with the school’s community
  • increasing teacher capability in current best practice in teaching and learning
  • promoting a more positive school culture.
Progress

The school is effectively addressing its priorities for review and development.

The principal and deputy principal are leading a well managed and considered process for change. Student achievement information is used strategically to identify school strengths and areas where improvements should be made next. Teachers have participated in both externally and internally facilitated professional development to enhance their use of assessment information. This has resulted in increased, and in some cases accelerated, progress and achievement. Teachers are beginning to review the effectiveness of their teaching practices in supporting students’ learning. Senior leaders are closely monitoring the progress of each student and are implementing appropriate support strategies.

Teachers have responded positively to the challenges of increasing their knowledge and understanding of effective teaching and learning practices and have developed a greater understanding of the National Standards. This knowledge has supported teachers in making increasingly sound overall teacher judgements (OTJs) about student achievement. Senior managers monitor the robustness of the OTJs and have strategies to help teachers to ensure results are consistent. Parents receive useful reports about their children’s progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards.

Significant progress has been made in aligning the school’s curriculum to the histories and culture of the local community. Teachers, parents and whānau have a variety of opportunities to contribute to the learning programme. Senior managers and teachers are using indicators of expected learning within curriculum areas and reporting student outcomes to the board. Making students’ home languages and background cultures more visible in classroom programmes continues to be a focus for development.

The board and senior managers have held hui and fono to gather families’ views into community perspectives. This information has helped the development of the school’s charter, values and strategic direction. Trustees have talked with local iwi to increase their knowledge of local kaupapa.

Senior managers have implemented a variety of strategies to support Māori to succeed as Māori. They have introduced kapa haka for the senior school and promoted leadership opportunities. School leaders report an increased sense of mana across the school.

3 Sustainable performance and self review

How well placed is the school to sustain and continue to improve and review its performance?

The board, the principal and staff are well positioned to continue improving the school’s performance.

Trustees are committed to improving outcomes for all students. The board and senior leaders are working together effectively to achieve school goals. Self review is evidence informed and improvement focused. The board is well informed and receives good quality student achievement information from the principal and senior leaders. The board reflects on this information and uses it to determine school-wide priorities. The principal reports regularly to the board on progress towards meeting these priorities.

Clear expectations and an increased focus on improving student outcomes are contributing to greater consistency of teaching and learning practices across the school. Teachers have worked effectively with the SAF and the professional development facilitator to build their capacity. Trustees are now more involved in understanding and using student achievement information.

Trustees have introduced a useful cycle of regular self review that considers all areas of governance. Included in this schedule are opportunities for the board to respond to current issues as they arise. The process could be strengthened by including a review of the board’s effectiveness as governors of the school.

Improvements since ERO’s 2012 review have established a sound foundation and a positive learning environment that are likely to help sustain good practices and continue improving outcomes for students.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

24 January 2014

About the School

Location

Papakura, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1434

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

122

Gender composition

Boys 53%

Girls 47%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Indian

Tongan

Samoan

other

64%

10%

10%

7%

5%

4%

Review team on site

November 2013

Date of this report

24 January 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

June 2012

June 2009

June 2006