Papatoetoe Intermediate

Education institution number:
1428
School type:
Intermediate
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
690
Telephone:
Address:

175 Motatau Road, Papatoetoe, Auckland

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Papatoetoe Intermediate - 20/09/2017

Findings

Papatoetoe Intermediate has undergone significant school-wide improvement. Strengthened professional leadership has been established. The principal, senior leaders, teachers and support staff have worked together to improve practices that promote student engagement and successful learning. They are developing a school that is learner-centred, and focused on developing successful, high achieving students.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Background and Context

What is the background and context for this school’s review?

Papatoetoe Intermediate School is a large culturally diverse school and has served its local community for many years. The roll has remained stable over the past 3 years and has a majority of Pacific and Indian students.

Over the past four years significant issues with finance, personnel and governance resulted in the school receiving support from Ministry of Education (MoE) Limited Statutory Managers (LSM) and most recently a commissioner.

In 2014 ERO identified a number of areas of school-wide systems and practices that required improvement. The school has worked with ERO and MoE guidance to address these areas. There have been significant improvements to governance, personnel and the quality of leadership and teaching and learning.

The principal and school leaders have successfully led change management across the school that is resulting in children receiving more responsive and engaging learning programmes. The commissioner has planned a well-considered path to reinstating the board of trustees.

2 Review and Development

How effectively is the school addressing its priorities for review and development?

Priorities identified for review and development

ERO’s 2014 report identified that improvements were necessary to:

  • strengthen the analysis and reporting of student achievement
  • improve the quality of teaching and learning
  • improve curriculum design and implementation
  • build leadership and governance capability to sustain and embed changes.
Progress

The principal provides significant educational leadership. In collaboration with senior leaders and teachers, she has implemented strategic, considered and highly effective responses to the recommendations identified in the 2014 ERO review. This has resulted in improved school practices and operations, including better reporting systems. Senior leaders place a strong priority on the analysis and use of student achievement information, and on ensuring that this information is well used to inform planning for teaching and learning.

Developing an inclusive and positive school culture has been a key part of the work to improve students’ educational outcomes. Considerable professional learning and development has supported senior leaders to build professional capability and collective capacity across the school. This approach is generating greater collaboration for school improvement and helping to increase the capability at all levels of the school. Senior leaders are strategically planning to move from reliance on external expertise to a more sustainable approach for improvement.

Significant changes in the school’s teaching culture has contributed to greater student wellbeing and motivation to engage and achieve. The sustained work on teacher improvement has led to a fundamentally different quality of teaching and learning that is being constantly refined. Positive improvements include more personalised learning for individual and groups of students. Classrooms are settled, productive work environments.

Senior leaders and teachers have actively promoted parent and whānau engagement. There has been a significant increase in parents and whānau working together with teachers to enable them to better support their children’s learning and progress.

Senior leaders with teachers have reviewed the school curriculum. Key components of the revised curriculum are: responsive teaching and learning, deliberate acts of teaching, and students taking more ownership for their learning within local and relevant contexts. There is greater consistency in the planning of teaching and learning programmes at all levels of the school.

3 Sustainable performance and self review

How well placed is the school to sustain and continue to improve and review its performance?

The school is significantly better placed to sustain and continue to improve and review its performance. Improved educational leadership, effective teaching and coherent systems now support a school culture focused on improving outcomes for students. Decision making is well considered and informed by different sources of evidence. This is resulting in good strategic decision making and efficient resourcing at all levels of the school.

Internal evaluation is developing well and is now used more at leadership, team and teaching levels. Staff inquiry cycles align with school goals and are based on improving student outcomes through targeted actions. Increased student achievement between 2013 and 2015 is evidence of the school’s growing strengths.

Senior leaders model collaboration to promote a greater shared understanding and more collective decision making among staff. They provide time and encouragement for middle leaders and teachers to share best practice and to focus on enhancing teaching through targeted professional development. This is resulting in a more cohesive staff culture.

The commissioner is providing effective school governance. He has implemented a range of strategies to engage with the school community. An advisory group, representative of the community has been established to contribute to school decision making. The commissioner has planned a well-considered path to reinstating a board of trustees.

Senior leaders plan to continue progressing the development priorities noted in this report. In particular, senior leaders have identified the key areas of:

  • continuing to raise student achievement
  • further developing teacher and leader capability
  • continuing to develop a curriculum that is responsive to students’ interests and learning needs
  • using internal evaluation to continue lifting school performance.

Recommendations

ERO intends to monitor the implementation of the plans for working towards the reinstatement of the board of trustees. On this basis another ERO review is likely to be undertaken in three years.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Papatoetoe Intermediate has undergone significant school-wide improvement. Strengthened professional leadership has been established. The principal, senior leaders, teachers and support staff have worked together to improve practices that promote student engagement and successful learning. They are developing a school that is learner-centred, and focused on developing successful, high achieving students.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Violet Tu’uga Stevenson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

Te Tai Raki - Northern Region

20 September 2017

About the School

Location

Papatoetoe, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1428

School type

Intermediate (Years 7 to 8)

School roll

732

Gender composition

Boys 53% Girls 47%

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Indian
Samoan
Tongan
Cook Islands Māori
Fijian/Indian
Niue
Asian
Vietnamese
other

14%
4%
26%
18%
11%
7%
4%
2%
7%
4%
3%

Special Features

Resource Teachers: Learning and Behaviour Cluster

Mt Richmond Special School satellite classrooms

Social Workers in School (SWIS)

Review team on site

July 2017

Date of this report

20 September 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Education Review
Education Review

August 2014
April 2011
May 2008

Papatoetoe Intermediate - 08/08/2014

Findings

How effectively is this school’s curriculum promoting student learning - engagement, progress and achievement?

Papatoetoe Intermediate School provides students with a welcoming and culturally affirming environment. The school is undergoing considerable change aimed at improving students’ achievement and extending their learning opportunities. ERO recommends external support to help continue and embed the progress the school is making towards its new direction.

ERO intends to carry out another review over the course of one-to-two years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Papatoetoe Intermediate provides a welcoming environment for its predominantly Māori, Pacific and Indian students. Many of the students have home languages other than English. Students have opportunities to experience and celebrate the school’s diverse cultures. Roll growth is predicted for this school and an enrolment scheme is in place to manage this growth.

A strong sense of pride and belonging in the school is shared by staff, students and the wider school community. The school has made good use of the Ministry of Education’s Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L) programme. This has helped to promote and sustain an affirming school tone. A satellite unit, operated and managed by the Mt Richmond Special School, is located on the school grounds. Students and staff of the unit are included as part of the Papatoetoe Intermediate School community.

Since ERO’s 2011 review there have been significant changes in the school. In 2013, a new principal was appointed. She, together with a new board and new leadership teams, many of whom are new to their roles, is working to set a new educational direction for the school. This new direction is being supported by professional development for teachers that is targeted on improving outcomes for students.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

School achievement information is not yet used well to make positive changes to students’ progress and achievement. School data confirms that a large number of students achieve below expected levels.

School leaders are beginning to establish more effective and reliable assessment and reporting systems to better promote students’ progress and achievement. These new systems should help school leaders and trustees set increasingly relevant and meaningful targets that reflect the specific needs of groups and individual students who have been identified on entry to the school as being at risk of not achieving.

Students are engaged in learning both independently and collaboratively. Teachers help them to set learning goals. Classroom environments are planned to support learning and value student work. Senior leaders have identified, and ERO agrees, that a next step is to increase opportunities for students to take a greater role in leading their own learning.

School leaders and teachers are developing the capacity to form overall judgements about students’ progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards. However, the school has recognised, and ERO confirms, that reports to parents about their child’s achievement against the Standards do not yet meet Ministry of Education (MoE) requirements. The school reports that consultation to address this matter has begun.

While teachers have made some progress in using more reliable achievement information, students need further targeted teaching to help them make the accelerated progress necessary to reach their learning goals. Increased use of targeted teaching that is responsive to achievement information is an urgent need for the school. Students are keen and ready for teachers to increase the challenge and pace of learning.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

School leaders acknowledge that further work is needed for the school’s curriculum to effectively promote and support student learning. ERO affirms the steps being taken by school leaders to develop a more culturally responsive and effective curriculum that reflects the school community, deepens students’ and parents’ understanding of learning, and promotes their participation in learning. The principles, values and key competencies of The New Zealand Curriculum (NZC) could also be better embedded in school programmes.

Recent positive curriculum developments include the:

  • re-establishment of the SENCO role
  • development of new and improved systems and guidelines for teacher planning
  • appointment of an experienced teacher coach to lift the overall quality of teaching.

Students are provided with a variety of specialist programmes. They can participate and experience success in sporting, leadership and cultural activities. Strengthening Pacific, Indian and other cultural groups has created increased opportunities to promote students’ languages, cultures and identities.

Some good teaching practices are evident. These practices include targeted instruction based on teachers’ knowledge of individual students, and the sharing of learning intentions with students. However, there is considerable variability in the quality of teaching practice across the school. School leaders are working with teachers to develop school-wide expectations about teaching approaches that respond to diverse learners and accelerate their progress and achievement. This work should continue until all teaching programmes and practices reflect these agreed expectations.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school has taken some steps to promote educational success for Māori, as Māori. Fifteen percent of the students identify as Māori. A school kawa is beginning to be embedded. Māori students now have significant roles leading karanga, haka and waiata.

A newly developed te reo Māori programme is taught weekly to all students. Reviewing how well the te reo Māori programme is implemented and how well it caters for students and extends levels of competency in te reo Māori could be useful.

School leaders are beginning to discuss what educational success as Māori means in a school setting. They are using relevant MoE documents to develop their understanding. Developing a school-wide education plan for Māori success could help provide a more strategic and coordinated approach to further raising success for Māori students. The plan should specify achievement targets, and identify aspirations for success for Māori as Māori.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is not yet sufficiently well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

In 2013, an external advisor began working with the board to build capacity in school governance. The board requested a Limited Statutory Manager (LSM) to help address previous overspending and long-standing staffing issues. The LSM has worked effectively with the principal and trustees to rectify these issues. Over staffing has been addressed and staff appraisal processes have been strengthened. The LSM and the principal have also improved the financial management of the local cluster of Resource Teachers: Learning and Behaviour (RTLB) that is located on the school site.

New and experienced trustees are representative of the community and have a range of useful skills and expertise. External training has helped strengthen their understanding of their roles and responsibilities. The school has a positive tone and good relationships with families who have children at the school.

The principal has a pivotal role in leading the new school direction. She promotes school improvement and has undertaken extensive self review. This has incorporated input from staff, trustees, parents and community to identify school priorities. She works collaboratively and collegially with the senior leadership team. Further developing the educational leadership capacity of senior and middle leaders and their professional accountability could be useful next steps.

The board acknowledges that major property development will need to be undertaken by the school. One technology block has been closed due to health and safety concerns. The main classroom block requires extensive renovations. It is important that the principal has the time needed to lead the new school direction. ERO and the board agree that further external support would be appropriate for the management of property development.

Some teachers and members of the school community have been challenged by changes within the school and the new expectations placed on them. ERO affirms the school’s new direction as both timely and necessary. It recommends ongoing evaluation of school priorities with staff to help progress and embed planned improvements. More evaluative reporting processes would better inform the strategic direction and support the board’s self review.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989 and has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code. At the time of this review there were no international students attending the school.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Recommendations to other agencies

ERO recommends that the Secretary of Education consider extending the intervention under Part 7A of the Education Act, 1989, in order to support school leaders to improve curriculum design, the quality of student achievement information, the quality of teaching to accelerate student progress, and to support the board with property development.

Conclusion

Papatoetoe Intermediate School provides students with a welcoming and culturally affirming environment. The school is undergoing considerable change aimed at improving students’ achievement and extending their learning opportunities. ERO recommends external support to help continue and embed the progress the school is making towards its new direction.

ERO intends to carry out another review over the course of one-to-two years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

8 August 2014

About the School

Location

Papatoetoe, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1428

School type

Intermediate (Years 7 to 8)

School roll

735

Number of international students

0

Gender composition

Boys 50%

Girls 50%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Indian

Samoan

Tongan

Cook Island Māori

Chinese

Niue

Vietnamese

Cambodian

Filipino

Middle Eastern

other Pacific

other

15%

4%

29%

19%

10%

6%

5%

3%

3%

1%

1%

1%

1%

2%

Special Features

Resource Teachers: Learning and Behaviour Unit

Mt Richmond Special School satellite classrooms

Social Workers in School (SWIS)

Review team on site

June 2014

Date of this report

8 August 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

April 2011

May 2008

January 2005