Mangere East School

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Education institution number:
1348
School type:
Full Primary
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
548
Telephone:
Address:

21 Yates Road, Mangere East, Auckland

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School Context

Māngere East School is a full primary school catering for Years 1 to 8 in the English medium section of the school and Years 1 to 6 in the Samoan language section of the school. There are currently four Samoan medium classes operating. Tuition in the medium of Samoan will be available for Year 7 students from 2018. The school is located in the Auckland suburb of Māngere. At the time of this ERO review there were 587 students on the roll. Of these, approximately 72% have Pacific, mainly Samoan, backgrounds. Approximately 20% are Māori. Most of these are from ngā hau e whā with only a small number having links to Te Wai o Hua, the local iwi.

The school states that it strives to be a learning community where students, parents, whānau and staff work together in learning partnerships. Respect for others, respect for self and respect for the environment, are promoted alongside students’ cultural diversity.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, school-wide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • reading and writing in English
  • mathematics (in English)
  • students’ understanding and enactment of the school values.

At the time of this ERO review most of the senior leadership team were recently appointed to the school and a new principal had only just begun her tenure. The board of trustees is also relatively new, with most trustees only having served for about 18 months.

Manumea, the Samoan language section of the school, gives students the opportunity to celebrate, maintain and enhance their Samoan language, culture and identity, as well as learning to read and write in English. Parents and aiga actively participate as cultural experts across learning areas in Manumea.

Teachers have had ongoing professional development over several years in mathematics and writing.  The school has also recently begun implementing a Ministry of Education behaviour management initiative.

The school is part of the Whakatipu Akoranga Community of Learning | Kāhui Ako.

Evaluation Findings

Equity and excellence – valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for most of its students.

Most students at Māngere East School are achieving at or above national expectations. A significant improvement in achievement in 2015 has been sustained in 2016. Māori students are the highest achieving group within the school. Their overall achievement is higher than national comparisons. There is continuing disparity for Pacific students in reading and writing. Many of these students are learning English as a second language. Boys are not performing as well as girls.

Teachers reported to the board in 2016 that there are high levels of student capability in the area of self-management.

1.2 How effectively does this school respond to those Māori and other students whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is responding to some Māori and other students whose learning and achievement needs acceleration.

Leaders are yet to aggregate rates of progress data. While some school leaders have begun to collect acceleration data to monitor student progress and evaluate teaching programmes, the school has not yet developed a school-wide approach to collecting and using this type of data.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Many school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence.

Professional leaders are knowledgeable. They are working collaboratively and strategically to improve the quality and consistency of teacher practice. Senior leaders have ensured that middle leaders are well supported to fulfil their role. Middle leaders consistently promote school policies, systems and procedures, and expect high quality teaching and learning outcomes. Improved teacher practice and improved outcomes for students are evident.

A range of effective, sustainable strategies and systems are in place to build teacher capability, including teaching as inquiry and ongoing professional development in writing and mathematics. This professional development includes effective, ongoing evaluation that tracks and monitors improvements in teacher practice. 

The focus on a small number of successful teaching strategies has enabled many students to experience success. These strategies include:

  • strong relationships among teachers and students are evident
  • enabling students to take more responsibility for their own learning
  • giving students choice about their learning
  • frequent teacher discussion and sharing about what might work for students at risk.

Working with parents to support learning at home is a feature of teacher practice. There is a school-wide approach to engaging parents as partners in helping children who are at risk of not achieving. It includes goal setting, regular meetings and the sharing of resources.

High levels of student engagement are evident in both sections of the school. Students with special needs participate in learning opportunities with appropriate support and challenge.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence?

Trustees, leaders and teachers need to strengthen the collation and use of assessment data. This is necessary to maximise the impact of targeted actions for at-risk students:

  • Achievement targets need to focus on accelerating the progress of all students who are at risk of not achieving.
  • Acceleration data to monitor the progress of individual students, classes and cohorts will allow teachers to see clearly whether teaching is lifting student achievement.

The school curriculum needs to be more culturally responsive. There is a need to ensure that teachers make greater use of Māori and Pacific content, context and perspective across the curriculum, and broaden the range of teaching strategies they use to include those preferred by Māori and Pacific learners.

Manumea, the Samoan language section of the school, now needs to consult with its parent community to clarify that its purpose continues to be aligned with parent aspirations and teacher practice. This will include reviewing:

  • the percentage of time students are immersed in the Samoan language
  • the assessment, monitoring and reporting of students’ fluency in Samoan oracy and literacy.

Leaders need to strengthen systems and processes for internal evaluation. This should enable them to evaluate the impact of key charter goals, innovations, and interventions with a focus on the extent to which these actions improve outcomes for students.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • collaborative and strategic leadership that is leading to improved teacher practice
  • its focus on a small number of successful teaching strategies that is leading to a consistent and coherent approach to accelerating achievement
  • the engagement of parents in a way that develops them as partners in learning.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, development priorities are in:

  • the collation and use of assessment data to maximise the impact of targeted actions for at risk leaners 
  • a culturally responsive curriculum to increase student belonging, progress and achievement
  • internal evaluation processes and practices. 

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in three years. 

Lynda Pura-Watson
Deputy Chief Review Officer

Te Tai Miringa - Waikato / Bay of Plenty Region

5 March 2018

About the school 

Location

Manukau, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1348

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

587

Gender composition

Boys      52%
Girls       48%

Ethnic composition

Māori                   20%
Samoan               33%
Other Pacific       21%
Tongan                18%
Indian                     4%
Other                      2%
Pākehā                   2%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

November 2017

Date of this report

5 March 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review             January 2015
Education Review             December 2011
Education Review             June 2008

 

 

Findings

The school’s vision and values promote a positive, settled school tone. Students make good progress in their learning. School priorities are to review the curriculum to further enhance students’ critical thinking skills and educational success for Māori, and to ensure the school is well placed for Year 7 and 8 students.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Mangere East School continues to provide good quality education for students from Years 1 to 6. Students are predominantly of Pacific origin, with large groups of Samoan, Cook Island and Tongan students. Māori students comprise about 22 percent of the roll. Approximately a quarter of all students have English as an additional language.

The school’s vision and values underpin the positive, settled tone of the school. The board and staff promote an affirming and inclusive learning environment and student wellbeing is well supported. The board has successfully built a modern learning environment (MLE) to replace classrooms lost in a serious fire in 2010. Manumea, the school’s Samoan Bilingual Unit, continues to be a successful and integral part of the school. The school environment is attractive and well maintained.

The school has a positive ERO reporting history. Trustees have responded positively to the recommendations of the school’s 2011 ERO report. Many noteworthy practices identified in that report have been maintained and further developed.

The experienced principal continues to provide future-focused leadership for the school and community. Since the last ERO review several new initiatives have been introduced, including whānau grouping. The board has recently received approval from the Ministry of Education to become a full primary school and will cater for students in Years 1 to 8 from 2015.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The board, school leaders and teachers use student achievement information well to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement.

Trustees set relevant achievement targets and provide specific resourcing that is focused on improving outcomes for students at risk of achieving to their potential.

School data shows that Māori and Pacific students achieve above the local, regional and national statistics for Māori and Pacific achievement. Some students, particularly those who participate in learning support programmes, are making accelerated progress in reading and writing. The principal agrees that it could be useful to analyse the school’s achievement data over time, particularly for students who have only attended Mangere East School.

Students successfully participate in the ‘Pasifika Maths’ programme. This programme promotes teaching mathematics through local and culturally relevant contexts that better fit the world view of the child. Students show high levels of engagement and enjoy opportunities for problem solving and discussing their learning as they work collaboratively with each other.

Recent professional development has helped teachers to make reliable judgements about children’s progress against the National Standards and to share this information with parents. Students would now benefit from opportunities to participate in meaningful discussions about their learning and achievement with their parents and teachers.

Teachers are committed to raising the achievement of students in reading, writing and mathematics. They participate in weekly professional learning discussions that help them to:

  • identify and closely monitor the progress of students whose learning needs to be accelerated
  • improve their professional knowledge and critique their teaching practice
  • use more deliberate teaching strategies to accelerate student progress.

School leaders continue to develop the quality of teaching practice across the school. Teacher professional development and school-wide focus on writing is building students' capacity to write with confidence. Where teachers use high quality teaching practices engagement in learning is high and students are active learners. School leaders acknowledge that establishing consistently effective teaching strategies that develop students’ critical thinking, creativity and ownership of learning is an important priority for the school.

The principal has recently returned from study leave. His sabbatical study focused on accelerating student learning and findings from this study could have a positive impact on students’ progress and achievement.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Mangere East School has developed a school curriculum that is relevant to its school context. It promotes positive outcomes for learners, is becoming better aligned with the principles ofThe New Zealand Curriculum (NZC), and places a suitable emphasis on the NZC key competencies.

Students are confident and eager participants in their learning. They appreciate caring and supportive relationships with teachers and each other. Student wellbeing is central to decisions about the curriculum. Students have a range of responsibilities and leadership opportunities, and serve the school well. Students’ emotional and social competence is promoted and those with special educational needs are well catered for. Effective transition processes are in place with neighbouring early childhood services.

Students experience a curriculum that emphasises reading, writing and mathematics. Their writing and oral language are celebrated at school, with parents, and in the community through on-line provisions and the school’s radio station. Opportunities for students, teachers and parents to provide feedback to teachers further supports two-way conversations about learning and helps students to achieve.

Inquiry learning models teach students strategies that enhance their sense of directing and owning their learning. Students also experience a broader curriculum through sports, the performing arts, ICT and education outside the classroom. The physical environment of the MLE provides good opportunities for students to learn more cooperatively and collaboratively with each other.

The new whānau grouping structure promotes many opportunities to enact the school vision of 'Together We Learn – Me Akō Tahi Tātou'. Cultural concepts of manaakitanga and tuakana/teina learning relationships are fostered. Teachers know the students and their families well.

A key initiative of the school’s curriculum is promoting educational success for Samoan students. The board’s commitment to bilingual education in Samoan and English is well resourced. Students have good opportunities to explore the curriculum in the Manumea teaching unit. This positive learning environment successfully promotes and nurtures Samoan students’ language, culture and identity.

School leaders acknowledge the importance of continuing to develop an engaging, relevant and challenging curriculum. They are currently undertaking a curriculum review. Leaders recognise that priorities for review and development could include:

  • reviewing the school’s curriculum against the principles and key competencies of the NZC and considering programme design for Year 7 and 8 students
  • looking at how Te Aho Arotaki Marau mo te Ako i te reo Māori – Kura Auraki (Curriculum Guidelines for Teaching and Learning Te Reo Māori in English-medium Schools) could enhance the school’s curriculum
  • exploring how promoting science and further extending student-centred learning opportunities might strengthen students’ critical thinking and problem solving skills
  • broadening the identification of, and in-class provision for, those students who are gifted and talented.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Mangere East School has some positive initiatives in place that promote educational success for Māori students, as Māori.

Māori students are involved in pōwhiri and kapa haka in the school and community. They celebrate and provide leadership during Matariki and Māori Language Week. The establishment of whānau groups in the school’s organisational structure acknowledges the importance of tikanga Māori in the way students learn. Māori students are also well represented in wider leadership roles within the school.

To further support success for Māori students, school leaders acknowledge there would be value in:

  • developing a school-wide te reo Māori language learning progression to extend students’ language skills
  • better understanding how Ministry of Education strategies, such as Ka Hikitia-Accelerating Success 2013 - 2017 and Tātaiako - Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners, can further influence school performance and enhance outcomes for learners.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

Trustees are longstanding members of the community, and it is timely that board members now review their roles and responsibilities and align these, where appropriate, with the goals and aspirations contained in the school's charter and strategic plans. Board review should also include a formal process for succession planning so that the board remains well placed to serve the school now and in the future.

Self-review processes are focused on teaching, learning, and promoting positive outcomes for students. They include a focus on students at risk of not achieving to their potential. Student achievement information is used strategically to inform decision making. The principal ensures that there is clear alignment from the strategic plan, through the annual plan, to the well developed plans that support programme implementation.

A new deputy principal joined the leadership team in 2014. School leaders work well together and provide opportunities that allow teachers to also develop skills as leaders. The school’s appraisal process is robust and based on an effective model that is focused on improving outcomes for students.

The school is developing a culture of professional inquiry. Leaders provide good support, guidance and systems to promote teacher dialogue and reflection about their practice. Well considered professional learning and development is having a positive impact on improving teaching practice.

The board and school leaders are committed to developing the school as a learning community. Whānau are welcome at the school and are encouraged to take an active role in their children’s learning. The aiga of students in Manumea meet regularly to strengthen learning partnerships between home and school. Leaders have initiated some good learning partnership opportunities that help teachers and parents to work more collaboratively to support children’s learning.

The school has developed good relationships with Tainui as mana whenua. School leaders could now explore how the Tainui education plan might benefit the tamariki of Mangere East School. The school continues to explore ways to improve educational success for Māori, as Māori. Meeting regularly with whānau Māori could support this initiative.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

The school’s vision and values promote a positive, settled school tone. Students make good progress in their learning. School priorities are to review the curriculum to further enhance students’ critical thinking skills and educational success for Māori, and to ensure the school is well placed for Year 7 and 8 students.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey

Deputy Chief Review Officer - Northern Northern Region

16 January 2015

About the School

Location

Mangere East, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1348

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

499

Gender composition

Boys 55%

Girls 45%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Samoan

Tongan

Cook Island

Niue

Indian

other ethnicities

24%

2%

32%

16%

12%

5%

4%

5%

Special Features

Samoan Bilingual Unit

Review team on site

November 2014

Date of this report

16 January 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

December 2011

June 2008

June 2005