Don Buck School

Education institution number:
1262
School type:
Full Primary
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
240
Telephone:
Address:

124 Don Buck Road, Massey, Auckland

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Don Buck School

Te Ara Huarau | School Profile Report

Background

This Profile Report was written within 6 months of the Education Review Office and Don Buck School working in Te Ara Huarau, an improvement evaluation approach used in most English Medium State and State Integrated Schools. For more information about Te Ara Huarau see ERO’s website. www.ero.govt.nz

Context

Don Buck School is located in Massey, Auckland and caters for students in Years 1 to 8. The school vision is for all ākonga to be exceptional through their skills, talents, and passions. This vision guides the school to positively affect the lives of teachers, tamariki and the community.

Don Buck School’s strategic priorities for improving outcomes for learners are:

  • develop the DBS culture of teaching and learning.

  • growing exceptional teaching.

  • building Don Buck School as a community hub.

You can find a copy of the school’s strategic and annual plan on Don Buck School’s website.

ERO and the school are working together to determine the impact of consistent effective teacher practices and processes on improving positive learner outcomes.

The rationale for selecting this evaluation is:

  • to ensure all ākonga access and experience high quality teaching and learning where learner needs are consistently prioritised.

  • to provide and connect whānau and learners with snapshots of real-time agentic learning using online tools, and through open class sessions.

  • explorative learning foci that support learners building curiosity and creativity.

  • alignment with National Education Learning Priorities (NELP), to ensure barrier free access to learning.

  • to give life and focus to the vision of the ‘DBS Beat’ and school values.

The school expects to see:

  • consistent and adaptive teaching practices, focussed on creating opportunities that support engaged, agentic and challenged learners, all focused on improving learning outcomes.

  • progress and achievement tracked, analysed, and used by teachers and leaders with a focus on building capacity and capability explicitly in numeracy and literacy to ensure equitable outcomes.

  • teachers knowing their learners and knowing the practices that enable them to reach their and their learners ‘exceptional’ potential.

  • grow leadership for all.

Strengths

The school can draw from the following strengths to support the school in its goal to determine the impact of consistent effective teacher practices and processes on positive learner outcomes:

  • ākonga have a powerful sense of belonging.

  • tuakana-teina relationships embedded into the school vision and WAKA values.

  • a school culture focused on improving teaching and learning.

  • vision encapsulates a shared language focused on being exceptional together.

  • openness to the community and working towards becoming a community hub.

Where to next?

Moving forward, the school will prioritise:

  • gap analysis and acceleration practices, focused on lifting student progress and achievement, explicitly in literacy and numeracy.

  • continuing to relentlessly focus on attendance with the aim of 90 percent regular attendees.

  • an ongoing focus on building consistency in the practices and processes of teaching and learning.

  • reviewing internal evaluative practices to consider schoolwide consistency and best practice systems.

  • developing coaching, with the leaders using a common language to work alongside and support teacher growth.

  • strengthening whānau/parent and community partnerships around ‘learning talk’.

ERO’s role will be to support the school in its evaluation for improvement cycle to improve outcomes for all learners. ERO will support the school in reporting their progress to the community. The next public report on ERO’s website will be a Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report and is due within three years.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

2 November 2023

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement.  educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Don Buck School

Board Assurance with Regulatory and Legislative Requirements Report 2023 to 2026

As of August 2023, the Don Buck School Board has attested to the following regulatory and legislative requirements:

Board Administration

Yes

Curriculum

Yes

Management of Health, Safety and Welfare

Yes

Personnel Management

Yes

Finance

Yes

Assets

Yes

Actions for Compliance

ERO and the board have identified the following area of non-compliance during the board assurance process:

  • Ensuring all teachers have a current practising certificate.
    [Section 92(2) Education and Training Act 2020]

The board has since addressed the area of non-compliance identified.

Further Information

For further information please contact Don Buck School, School Board.

The next School Board assurance that it is meeting regulatory and legislative requirements will be reported, along with the Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report, within three years.

Information on ERO’s role and process in this review can be found on the Education Review Office website.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

2 November 2023 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Don Buck School - 07/06/2018

School Context

Don Buck School caters for students in Years 1 to 8. The culturally diverse school roll has continued to grow since ERO’s 2013 review. The roll includes 32 percent Maori learners, 23 percent of Pacific heritage and seven percent Indian. There is an increase in the numbers of learners from the Middle East and South East Asia who make up 10 percent of the school roll.

Don Buck School is the RTLB (Resource Teachers for Learning and Behaviour) lead school for 53 local schools and 31 RTLB staff. There is one social worker attached to the school.

The school’s strategic focus is the implementation of play-based learning, the wellbeing of the school community, and community involvement and participation. The charter targets improvement in reading, writing and mathematics achievement. Leaders and teachers are currently updating parents/whānau understanding of progress and achievement across the curriculum.

Consultation with the school community has guided the mission/vision statement ‘with a sense of optimism, in partnership with our community, we will provide a nurturing and stimulating learning environment, based on individual needs, which promotes personal success for all children.’ The vision is underpinned by values of manaakitanga (care), hiranga (excellence), matauranga (knowledge), whakaute (respect), whaiwhitanga (participation), kawenga (responsibility), whanaungatanga (community) and rerenga ketanga (diversity).

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • achievement in reading, writing and mathematics

  • achievement in relation to school targets

  • initiatives and programmes that improve valued outcomes for learners.

The principal’s reports to the board also reflect the school’s use of curriculum expectations, key competencies and the significance of student wellbeing outcomes.

Since the 2013 ERO review, there has been continuity of leadership. The board of trustees includes an experienced, long serving board chair and newly appointed and experienced members. Staff have participated in professional learning in literacy to increase their capability to make positive changes for learners. 2018 professional learning includes a focus on play-based learning.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

School data over the last three years show that the school has sustained and improved the levels of student achievement in reading, writing and mathematics. The majority of children achieve at national expectations across the three learning areas.

Pacific girls have made significant gains in their achievement in writing and mathematics. The school is successfully working toward parity for Māori students in mathematics. Data show increased levels of mathematics achievement for these students.

School literacy data show some disparity between the achievement of boys and girls, with girls achieving at higher levels although this gap is closing. This disparity reflects a recent trend due to a large increase of new learners in the school, particularly boys, needing specific support to begin their school learning journey. Senior leaders target, deliberately plan for, and monitor the outcomes for these learners using the concept of hauora/wellbeing.

Learners achieve very well in relation to the school’s broader valued outcomes. Most students:

  • have strong relationships of care and respect for each other

  • display skills to self-manage and reflect on their growth as learners

  • collaborate with, learn from and support the learning of their peers

  • are inclusive and accepting of difference

  • exhibit high levels of citizenship and pride in themselves and the school.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school is highly effective in its response to those students whose learning and achievement needs acceleration. Senior leaders place a high priority on responding to the learning and wellbeing needs of these children. They promote high expectations and personalised learning practices. Their commitment is underpinned by increased teacher accountability for the progress of these children.

Charter targets are appropriately focused on those students not achieving at expectation in reading, writing and mathematics. Teachers, leaders and whānau work together to develop strategies for these children. Teachers reflect on the effectiveness of these strategies and class programmes in supporting student success. Children’s progress is well monitored, and responded to at syndicate and school-wide levels.

A very effective intervention to accelerate reading has accelerated the progress of a group of Year 4 to 6 learners. This intervention has also increased children’s self-confidence as learners, and extended ways of engaging parents in learning partnerships. As a result, teachers are improving the way they arrange for learning to happen in reading for all students across the school.

In 2015, teachers implemented an effective intervention for Year 2 students to accelerate their writing skills. Significant shifts were achieved predominately by Māori and Pacific students.

Teachers continue to work on improving parity for boys in literacy. They prioritise the use of oral language skills by deliberately extending children’s voice and agency in their practices across the curriculum.

Teachers and leaders have established learning progressions that allow students to know what they are learning, and increasingly take responsibility for their learning progress.

Children show positive shifts in their wellbeing, confidence and engagement in learning. These accelerated shifts help them become more independent and improve and sustain their learning over time. The school has a holistic focus on wellbeing, and learning competencies and skills development. This is highly significant in ensuring learners’ readiness and engagement in their learning.

Through the Māori concept of hauora, the school has a wraparound approach focused on the wellbeing of all tamariki/children. This is inclusive of children’s health, social, behaviour and learning needs, inclusive of whānau/family. This approach is key to how this school is achieving equity and excellence.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

The school’s processes and actions are very effective in supporting learners to achieve excellence and equity. This is mostly attributable to highly capable school leadership, strong engagement with the community, a responsive curriculum with a holistic wellbeing focus, and meaningful use of evaluation.

School leaders give professional guidance to maintain an inclusive learning environment that values diversity. They model optimism and authentic relationships that set learners up for success, participation, wellbeing and citizenship. Through their strongly collaborative approach, leaders promote a collective responsibility for students’ equitable and excellent outcomes.

Leaders and teachers foster children’s confidence and skills to be active members in the school community. Special programmes promote leadership, self-efficacy and independence through a focus on social skills and relationships. Strong learning partnerships between learners, teachers, teacher aides and whānau support high levels of student engagement in learning. Trusting and respectful relationships form the basis of a team approach for each individual child within an inclusive environment.

The school’s curriculum promotes students’ development of learning dispositions and skills for self-directed learning. Literacy, numeracy and the key competencies are prioritised across the curriculum. Children have opportunities to make links in their learning and connections to real world contexts though the school’s integrated inquiry model and a strong focus on the arts. Student leaders in the middle and senior school promote and sustain the school’s culture through tuakana teina opportunities.

Māori perspectives are reflected in class programmes, the environment and everyday school life. This provides opportunities for Māori children to have a sense of identity in the school, and for all children to learn about New Zealand’s bicultural heritage.

The board, leaders and teachers maintain strong connections with parents, whānau and the community. These relationships enhance students’ learning opportunities, achievement and wellbeing. Parents and whānau are valued partners in children’s learning, and their opinions are regularly sought. The whānau learning centre is a designated place for parents/whānau to connect with each other and gain a sense of community.

A professional culture is actively nurtured by school leaders. Professional learning is linked to the school’s strategic direction. These opportunities are increasing teachers’ knowledge and skills, and the school’s curriculum. Professional learning is based on educational research, and adapted to what will be most effective in improving outcomes for learners at Don Buck School.

Internal evaluation includes layers of in-depth reflection that contribute to changes in thinking and actions for ongoing improvement. Evaluative practice has an explicit focus on student wellbeing, readiness for learning and the reduction of achievement disparity. As a result school processes are modified, changed or introduced to overcome barriers to achieving equity and excellence for all learners.

The school has an explicit aim for Māori learners to be confident in their language, culture and identity, and it has high expectations for all learners. Collective responsibility for achieving success for each learner is highly evident through whanaugatanga, manaakitanga, and the many tuakana teina learning opportunities in the curriculum.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Agreed next steps are to:

  • continue to extend the school-wide pedagogy to promote student agency and develop self-directed, creative and collaborative learners

  • strengthen the board’s focus on more rigorous evaluation of its stewardship processes and systems to bring about parity for all learners.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • leadership that promotes collaborative responsibility for achieving improved outcomes for all learners

  • a culture of respect and care that responds to students’ individual needs, promotes their wellbeing and supports their learning success

  • a responsive curriculum that offers breadth and depth of learning opportunities

  • educationally powerful connections and relationships with parents, whānau and community that positively impact on children’s achievement and wellbeing

  • internal evaluation processes that contribute to changes in thinking and action for ongoing improvement.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • the promotion of student voice and agency

  • ongoing evaluation of the board’s stewardship processes.

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in four-to-five years.

Julie Foley

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

Te Tai Raki - Northern Region

7 June 2018

About the school

Location

Massey, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1262

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

282

Gender composition

Girls 53% Boys 47%

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Samoan
Indian
Tongan
Middle Eastern
Niuean
Filipino
other Pacific peoples
other South East Asian
other European
other

32%
11%
20%
7%
4%
3%
2%
2%
7%
7%
2%
3%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

April 2018

Date of this report

7 June 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Education Review
Education Review

June 2013
December 2009
June 2006

Don Buck School - 13/06/2013

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Don Buck School is a full primary providing education for students from Years 1 to 8. It has a positive ERO reporting history and continues to focus on ongoing improvement. The school is culturally diverse, including 26 percent Māori and 45 percent Pacific nationalities. Don Buck School is the RTLB (Resource Teachers for Learning and Behaviour) lead school for 53 local schools and 33 RTLB staff. Students requiring additional learning assistance are well supported by teachers, teacher aides, RTLBs and external agencies.

Don Buck School is highly effective in promoting student learning progress and achievement. The school’s professional leadership is making a positive impact on the quality of teaching and student learning. The principal, senior leaders and staff are focused on ongoing improvement and increasing their responsiveness to the needs of students and parents. Teachers are strongly committed to professional learning and are regularly reviewing the quality of teaching and learning.

The school has made significant shifts in building positive community relationships and increasing parent and family participation at the school. The school’s focused approach to strengthening community connections provides opportunities for parents and families to access local support services through a variety of school events. This has created an environment that endeavours to support the overall well being of students. The school’s self review indicates that this is contributing to student success.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school is governed by a capable and committed board. They are well informed and confident that the school is making good use of student achievement data and is responding appropriately to students' learning. The principal with the staff have developed meaningful student achievement targets and follow a sound process for reporting to parents. School leaders continue to review the effectiveness of reports to parents. They have put in place a considered and meaningful approach to reporting that values parents input about their children’s learning.

The schools’ capable leadership team supports teachers to engage students in their learning in meaningful ways. School data indicates that students are making significant progress in reading, writing and mathematics. Most students are achieving at or above national standards in these areas. There are sound processes in place to help students who require additional learning support and extension.

Overall, Māori students achieve well above in reading, writing and mathematics. Most Pacific students are also showing improvement. School leaders have identified the need to strengthen the school’s annual planning in order to accelerate Pacific student’s progress.

Teachers have created a learning environment that encourages students to set their own learning goals and to become more aware of their own progress. They are also building student’s capacity to explore, understand and value their own culture, language and identity.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum is highly effective in promoting students’ learning progress and achievement. School leaders demonstrate high levels of integrity and genuine responsibility to serve students and their families well. Comprehensive consultation with the parents and ongoing discussions with teachers provides a focused learning environment for students and teachers.

Teachers have high expectations of students. They are proactive in making sure they know students and their families well. This is helping them to develop, implement and review a curriculum that is responsive to students’ learning preferences and strengths.

The board’s strategic appointment of a curriculum coordinator, teacher commitment to ongoing staff professional development and positive home and school relationships contribute to a school curriculum that is increasingly relevant for students. School values and principles underpin what the school leaders and teachers define as a responsive curriculum. This is evident in the way that teachers:

  • have high expectations of students’ learning and celebrate their achievements
  • enable students to confidently contribute and question
  • promote collaborative, active and student /driven class programmes and varied learning situations
  • integrate literacy, numeracy and the key competencies across all curriculum areas
  • promote a safe and stimulating environment throughout the school community.

School leaders have linked the school’s curriculum with The New Zealand Curriculum and national standards framework, with emphasis on responding to and identifying meaningful pathways for students’ future learning. The curriculum is supported by a comprehensive long-term plan that guides school leaders and teachers to review its implementation.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school is well placed to promote educational success for Māori and is supporting Māori students to explore and understand their success as Māori. The school environment promotes pride and success for Māori students in various ways. Extensive community consultation has been a significant move for the school. This has enabled the principal, school leaders and teachers to increase their knowledge about what Māori parents want for their children and how the school can support them. Māori students are able to learn through a curriculum that:

  • acknowledges the Māori dimension of Aotearoa New Zealand
  • contributes to their understanding of their Māori identity
  • integrates aspects of tikanga Māori and te reo Māori
  • includes the ideas and contributions of Māori whānau
  • recognises the success of Māori students achievement and factors that contribute to it.

School leaders have sound systems in place to effectively monitor the achievement and progress of Māori students.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance. Good practices include:

  • positive relationships and connections with families, community agencies and local schools
  • insightful professional leadership, a collaborative teaching team and targeted professional learning and development
  • a strategic plan that provides a sound framework for ongoing review and development
  • strategic staff appointments to help embed curriculum developments and success for Māori students
  • environments that promote pride and success for Māori and Pacific families.

The board and school leaders have identified the need to better align developments in curriculum design, teaching practice, school goals and learning outcomes for students.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

13 June 2013

About the School

Location

Massey, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1262

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

209

Gender composition

Girls 50% Boys 50%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Samoan

Other Pacific

Indian

Filipino

Niue

Australian

Other European

Fijian

South Slovakian

Other Asian

Tongan

Cook Island Māori

Other South East Asian

Middle Eastern

26%

8%

20%

19%

9%

4%

2%

1%

2%

2%

2%

1%

1%

1%

1%

1%

Special Features

33 Resource Teachers: Learning and Behaviour One attached Social Worker in Schools

Review team on site

April 2013

Date of this report

13 June 2013

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

December 2009

November 2006

June 2003