Chaucer School

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Education institution number:
1243
School type:
Contributing
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
182
Telephone:
Address:

Chaucer Place, Blockhouse Bay, Auckland

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Summary

Chaucer School in Blockhouse Bay provides education for children from Years 1 to 6. The school’s students are from a diverse range of cultural backgrounds. Children with Pacific heritage make up 27 percent of the roll, with the majority being Samoan or Tongan. Children with Indian heritage form the next biggest group. Māori make up 12 percent and children from Middle Eastern backgrounds comprise 11 percent. The school hosts two Oaklynn Special School satellite classes.

Since ERO’s 2014 review, there have been some new appointments to the leadership team. The school is part of the Lynfield Community of | Kāhui Akonvolvement in the CoL is enhancing opportunities for teacher-led innovation and inquiry.Learning(CoL). I

The 2014 ERO report highlighted that development was necessary in areas including learning, curriculum and self review. This report notes that good progress has been made in these areas.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

Most children achieve at or above the National Standards by Year 6. The school has worked successfully to ensure that there is parity in achievement for Māori students in mathematics.

The school has a variety of effective school conditions and processes that support equity and excellence. Learners benefit from the school’s holistic approach to pastoral care, a responsive curriculum, good governance and leadership, and the promotion of an inclusive culture.

Continuing to refine and improve the analysis and use of achievement information, and internal evaluation practices has the potential to enhance the school’s response to children whose learning needs acceleration.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school responds effectively to all children whose learning and progress requires acceleration.

Overall children achieve well in relation to the National Standards. Information from 2016 shows that by the time children leave the school in Year 6, approximately 90 percent achieve at or above the National Standard in reading and mathematics and 80 percent in writing. It is notable that between 2015 and 2016 Māori children’s achievement in mathematics significantly increased across all year levels.

There has been some decline in National Standards achievement levels through 2016. It is important that school leaders further refine their analysis of student achievement so that they are able to determine the factors that may be influencing these changes in achievement levels. This is likely to help them to make better informed decisions regarding the strategies and resourcing being used to accelerate children’s learning.

External professional development and regular in-school moderation is supporting the development of dependable teacher judgements about achievement in relation to the National Standards.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school has a variety of effective school conditions and processes that support the achievement of equity and excellence.

Children’s wellbeing is well supported through a holistic pastoral care programme. Most children enjoy a sense of belonging to the school, feel cared for and included. Senior children are given a wide range of formal and informal leadership postions, roles and opportunities that are both class-based and school-wide. This is growing their confidence as learners and their ability to support, lead and collaborate with others.

Children demonstrate confidence in their cultural identity. There is a strong sense that difference and diversity are respected. The school values the use of families’ home languages. Learning environments are inclusive and collaborative. Māori children have increasing opportunities to experience education success as Māori.

Teachers implement a curriculum that supports learners’ participation and engagement and gives them agency in their learning. The curriculum makes connections to children’s lives, prior understandings, out of school experiences and real world contexts. Students learn in an environment where they can take risks and errors are regarded as opportunities for learning.

School leaders are continuing to promote teaching strategies to support more personalised learning for children. It would now be useful for leaders to establish curriculum guidelines to provide a framework for building and sustaining consistently effective teaching practices.

Children with first languages other than English are well supported to access the curriculum. Children with special needs and abilities participate in learning opportunities that provide both support and challenge.

The board of trustees strongly promote the school’s vision to the community. Trustees are increasingly aware of their responsibilities as stewards of the school. They are working towards making better use of the information reported to them. They seek advice and resources to support them in their roles and make good use of their individual and collective expertise.

School leaders actively extend their own skills and understandings and support teachers in their professional growth. There are robust teacher appraisal processes in place. These closely align with teachers’ inquiry into the effectiveness of their practices to support targeted students whose learning needs to be accelerated. Teachers have opportunities to take leadership roles and have access to a wide variety of appropriate expertise to build their capability.There has been good progress in establishing processes for internal evaluation.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

To support ongoing development that promotes equity and excellence the school should:

  • continue to refine and improve the analysis and evaluation of datato determine the effectiveness of school practices and conditions and their impact on achievement and other valued outcomes for individuals and groups of children
  • establish leadership practices and school documentation to ensure that curriculum expectations are clear and support consistently effective teaching and learning.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Education (Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016 established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code. No international students were enrolled at the time of the ERO review.

Actions required

ERO identified non-compliance in relation to in-committee processes.

In order to address this the board must:

  • Implement robust complaints and in-committee processes and review school policies to ensure that they reflect the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, Public Records Act 2005, Vulnerable Children Act 2014 HS31 GMA7a

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Learners are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

Agreed next steps are to:

  • increase and refine leaders and teachers’ scrutiny of achievement data to deepen internal evaluation practices.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Violet Tu’uga Stevenson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

22 September 2017

About the school

Location

Blockhouse Bay

Ministry of Education profile number

1243

School type

Contributing

School roll

208

Gender composition

Girls 52% Boys 48%

Ethnic composition

Māori 12%

Pākehā 13%

Indian 18%

Samoan 11%

Tongan 11%

Middle Eastern 11%

Niue 4%

African 3%

Chinese 3%

Cook Island Māori 3%

Fijian 2%

other 9%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

June 2017

Date of this report

22 September 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review November 2014
Education Review August 2011
Education Review June 2008

Findings

Students are keen learners and many achieve well. They experience a curriculum focussed on literacy, mathematics and inquiry learning. A positive culture reflects the school’s values of respect, responsibility, safety and effort. The school’s vision promotes student leadership and tuakana/teina relationships. Trustees, leaders and staff are committed to engaging with the school’s communities.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Chaucer School, in West Auckland, caters for students from Years 1 to 6. The school roll is culturally diverse. Fourteen percent of students are Māori and 34 percent have Pacific heritage. Four new classrooms are currently being built in response to the school’s increasing roll.

Students, families and staff have a strong sense of belonging and community. The school's vision of 'travelling the learning path together' helps to promote a positive and supportive culture for students.

Oaklynn Special School has two satellite classes on the school site. Students and teachers from these classes integrate in activities with Chaucer School. Plans are in place to develop more modern learning environments within classrooms throughout the school.

The recently appointed, first time, principal has joined a senior leadership team which has a long-standing association with the school. Teachers are committed to improving their professional practice. During the past three years teachers have participated in professional learning to develop students’ literacy and numeracy.

ERO’s 2011 report suggested that teachers further develop the school’s curriculum to be more student-centred and to include more Māori contexts. The report also recommended that teachers and leaders review programmes provided to support underachieving students. The school has made progress in these areas.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Chaucer School is developing its use of achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement.

The school is improving the analysis of student achievement information to help teachers provide for students’ next steps in learning. Teachers and senior leaders gather assessment data and provide the board with good information about student achievement. Teachers are continuing to improve the reliability of this data. The school is using targets to raise achievement levels.

School achievement information indicates that the majority of students achieve at or above National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. The school has a strategic goal to raise Māori student achievement. Pacific students achieve well compared with national levels of Pacific achievement.

Teachers make good use of achievement information to identify groups of students who need additional support in their learning. Effective support is provided for these students, and teaching programmes are focused on students’ individual learning needs. Learning support programmes in reading and in English for speakers of other languages are well monitored. School data indicate that targeted groups of students are making good progress.

Recent initiatives are successfully promoting the engagement of whānau/parents in their children’s learning. Parents, who have been involved in these initiatives, appreciate the opportunities to learn about how to better support their children’s learning at home. These parents also report that their children are experiencing increased success in their learning.

The school has identified appropriate areas for improving learning outcomes for students. These include:

  • extending students’ understanding of their achievement and next learning steps
  • promoting further opportunities for whānau/families to support their children’s learning
  • reporting to the board explicitly on the progress of groups of students, including those receiving additional learning support
  • using plain language to report to parents about their children’s learning.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Chaucer School’s curriculum is promoting positive outcomes for learners. Teachers use successful strategies for supporting students’ literacy and mathematics learning. Students experience a curriculum that is focussed on literacy, mathematics and inquiry learning. Their learning is being supported by the growing use of digital technologies and opportunities for learning outside of the school.

The school also fosters students’ achievement in broader curriculum areas such as sport and the performing arts. The school’s vision of promoting student success is recognised in opportunities for leadership and tuakana/teina relationships. Students are confident and eager participants in their learning. They feel secure in the school and appreciate caring relationships with teachers and each other.

The school has identified key development priorities to provide students with engaging and relevant learning experiences. These include developing a curriculum that:

  • develops students’ critical thinking, creativity and ownership of learning
  • takes advantage of local contexts
  • reflects the principles of The New Zealand Curriculum, particularly the Treaty of Waitangi and Cultural Diversity principles.
How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school is beginning to promote success for Māori students, as Māori. A Te Ao Māori facilitator has been appointed to lead this development. The facilitator provides professional learning for teachers to help them use the Māori culture and language in the curriculum and school practices. Students are now taking leadership roles in karanga, powhiri and waiata.

Tātaiako - Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners, has been introduced into the appraisal of teachers’ practice. These competencies should help teachers to better understand and promote success for Māori students, as Māori.  

Senior leaders acknowledge the value of using a school-wide programme to develop students’ knowledge and use of te reo Māori. Such a programme could be based on Te Aho Arotaki Marau mō te Ako i te reo Māori – Kura Auraki which are curriculum guidelines for teaching and learning te reo Māori.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

Senior leaders actively encourage staff leadership. Teachers’ strengths and passions are used to promote students’ learning. Teachers are committed to professional learning and are increasingly reflecting on their teaching practice. Appraisal processes have been reviewed and refined to guide teachers’ use of effective teaching strategies.

The board is committed to providing a broad range of learning opportunities for students. Trustees contribute to the school’s strategic planning and they receive regular reports on progress towards achieving strategic goals. The board has Māori and Pacific representation.

The board, leaders and staff are committed to engaging with the school’s communities. Regular hui and fono provide opportunities to encourage whānau/families to contribute to their children’s learning and to be involved in the school. An active Parent Teachers Residents Association (PTRA) supports teaching and learning. Senior leaders could ensure that the school’s plans, policies and the outcomes of hui are shared with parents.

Self review contributes to the school’s ongoing improvement. Teachers and trustees should continue to broaden the scope of self review. They could also strengthen the reporting of self review findings by identifying outcomes for student learning. The board needs to ensure policies are regularly reviewed to guide the school’s practices.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

At the time of review there were three international students attending the school. Students are fully involved in the school and included in the school community.

School leaders should improve practices for international students by:

  • reporting explicitly to the board on students’ pastoral care, progress and achievement
  • more clearly documenting their annual review of compliance with the Code.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

To improve current practice, the board should review its complaints policy to establish and implement more thorough processes for responding appropriately to complaints.

Conclusion

Students are keen learners and many achieve well. They experience a curriculum focussed on literacy, mathematics and inquiry learning. A positive culture reflects the school’s values of respect, responsibility, safety and effort. The school’s vision promotes student leadership and tuakana/teina relationships. Trustees, leaders and staff are committed to engaging with the school’s communities.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey National Manager Review Services Northern Region

6 November 2014

About the School

Location

Blockhouse Bay, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1243

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

225

Number of international students

3

Gender composition

Boys 56% Girls 44%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Indian

Samoan

Middle Eastern

Tongan

Niue

Cook Island Māori

other Pacific

other

14%

16%

16%

12%

8%

8%

6%

5%

2%

13%

Special Features

Two satellite classes, Oaklynn Special School

Review team on site

August 2014

Date of this report

6 November 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

August 2011

June 2008

May 2006