Bayfield School

Education institution number:
1220
School type:
Contributing
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
360
Telephone:
Address:

2-12 Clifton Road, Herne Bay, Auckland

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Bayfield School

Te Ara Huarau | School Profile Report

Background

This Profile Report was written within six months of the Education Review Office and Bayfield School working in Te Ara Huarau, an improvement evaluation approach used in most English Medium State and State Integrated Schools. For more information about Te Ara Huarau see ERO’s website. www.ero.govt.nz

Context

Bayfield School is located in Herne Bay, Auckland and caters for learners in Years 1 to 6. The key values of respect / whakarangatira, responsibility / heipapa, excellence / huhuatanga and valuing diversity / kanorau underpin the school’s culture and philosophy.

Bayfield School’s strategic priorities for improving outcomes for learners are:

  • Courageous Learners- We will build resilient and tenacious risk-takers so that they are prepared for tomorrow.

  • Curious and Creative Learners- Through a rich, broad curriculum, we will develop creative learners so that they are confident, independent and visionary.

  • Collaborative Learners-Through understanding camaraderie, communication, accountability and being open to learning, we will create learners who can confidently collaborate with others for success.

  • Connected learners- Through an increased sense of identity, heritage, working with others, we will support learners to make connections with their learning, peers and others in our global community.

You can find a copy of the school’s strategic and annual plan on Bayfield School’s website.

ERO and the school are working together to evaluate how effectively it is implementing culturally responsive practices.

The rationale for selecting this evaluation is to ensure:

  • every learner is confident in their identity, socially and emotionally competent and a successful life-long learner.

  • progress and achievement outcomes are consistently equitable and excellent for all learners.

The school expects to see:

  • a positive and culturally responsive school learning climate which promotes learner engagement.

  • teaching practice which is consistently inclusive and adaptive and caters well for all learners.

  • teachers and learners use feedback in a culturally responsive way.

Strengths

The school can draw from the following strengths to support its goal to evaluate how effectively it is implementing culturally responsive practices:

  • an experienced, collaborative leadership team with a focus on continuous improvement and strong evaluative capacity.

  • the school has collective capacity to use evaluation and inquiry to build knowledge for improvement and innovation

  • teachers collaboratively plan and implement the localised curriculum

  • collaborative professional development continuously enhances teacher capability.

Where to next?

Moving forward, the school will prioritise:

  • embedding effective teacher feedback practice.

  • developing student agency through a peer feedback cycle.

ERO’s role will be to support the school in its evaluation for improvement cycle to improve outcomes for all learners. ERO will support the school in reporting their progress to the community. The next public report on ERO’s website will be a Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report and is due within three years.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

25 October 2023

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement.  educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Bayfield School

Board Assurance with Regulatory and Legislative Requirements Report 2023 to 2026

As of May 2023, the Bayfield School Board has attested to the following regulatory and legislative requirements:

Board Administration

Yes

Curriculum

Yes

Management of Health, Safety and Welfare

Yes

Personnel Management

Yes

Finance

Yes

Assets

Yes

Further Information

For further information please contact the Bayfield School Board.

The next School Board assurance that it is meeting regulatory and legislative requirements will be reported, along with the Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report, within three years.

Information on ERO’s role and process in this review can be found on the Education Review Office website.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

25 October 2023 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Bayfield School

Provision for International Students Report

Background

The Education Review Office reviews schools that are signatories to the Education (Pastoral Care of Tertiary and International Learners) Code of Practice 2021 established under section 534 of the Education and Training Act 2020.

Findings

The school is a signatory to the Education (Pastoral Care of Tertiary and International Learners) Code of Practice 2021 established under section 534 of the Education and Training Act 2020. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code and has completed an annual self-review of its implementation of the Code. At the time of this review there were two international students attending the school, and no exchange students.

Bayfield School has developed a process for self-review of the provision for international students which provides reliable information about policies and procedures, student wellbeing and achievement. School policies and guidelines are well-aligned to good practice expectations. International students are well supported to achieve success in their learning and their achievement is closely monitored by school staff. Open communication and regular interactions with parents and families support meaningful educational connections and relationships.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

25 October 2023 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Bayfield School - 02/10/2017

Summary

Bayfield School caters for children in Years 1 to 6 and currently has a roll of about 400. The roll includes 16 Māori children, 16 Pacific, and small numbers of children from a wide variety of other ethnic backgrounds.

Since the 2013 ERO evaluation the school the school hall, administration and classroom blocks have been upgraded. These new buildings reflect the school’s commitment to teaching and learning in modern, flexible spaces.

ERO’s 2013 report identified very good teaching and learning practices. These good practices have been sustained. In 2013 ERO recommended increasing the visibility of Pacific and other cultures in the curriculum and school environment. Very good progress has been made in this area. School information shows that high levels of student achievement have been sustained over time.

Bayfield School is one of 11 schools in the Waiorea Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako (CoL).

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school responds very effectively to children whose learning and achievement needs acceleration. There are very strong processes to help achieve equity and excellence for all children. These include a responsive curriculum, effective teaching practices, and high quality school leadership and governance.

The board and school leaders agree that further strengthening evaluation and inquiry will help to sustain improvement and innovation, and enhance their connections and relationships with parents and whānau.

Children are achieving excellent educational outcomes. School performance has been sustained over time through well focused, embedded processes and practices. This school has successfully addressed in-school disparity in educational outcomes.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

Bayfield School responds very effectively to children whose learning and achievement needs acceleration. Systems and practices for monitoring student achievement are sound. Well implemented assessment processes include good moderation practices that help to ensure that achievement data is dependable.

School information shows very high levels of student achievement in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. More than 90 percent of children achieve at or above the Standards. Teachers are taking steps to address some disparity in writing achievement for boys.

Māori and Pacific children make very good progress in their time in the school, and achieve well. Highly responsive approaches and effective teaching practices that value Māori and Pacific languages and cultural identities are helping these children to make good progress in their learning. Their achievement is monitored individually. The school has successfully raised achievement in reading and mathematics for Māori and Pacific learners, and in writing for Pacific.

Children identified as requiring additional learning support are closely monitored. Leaders and teachers work collaboratively with parents, para-professionals and external agencies, to cater very effectively for these children’s learning needs.

Children benefit from high quality personalised and responsive support and care systems. They develop skills to self-manage and lead and own their learning. Tuakana/teina approaches enable older and younger children to support and learn from each other.

The school’s emphasis on values such as excellence, responsibility, diversity and equity underpins high expectations for all children to succeed and know themselves as competent and capable learners.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school’s processes and actions are very effective in helping to achieve equity and excellence for all learners.

The school’s strengths-based curriculum builds on children’s capabilities and interests. It responds to each child as a unique learner. High levels of student agency are evident at all year levels. Children have many opportunities to make informed decisions about their learning. Through ‘growth mind-set’ approaches, children are supported to extend and drive their own learning.

School leadership and a highly collaborative professional environment successfully promote the achievement of equity and excellence. Senior leaders build relational trust with staff and have developed strong systems that support consistent and effective practices across the school.

Teachers take collective responsibility for children’s success and are skilled at supporting them to reach their potential. They have a shared understanding of the practices that work for children, and take responsibility for their own professional growth. Digital technologies are used well to promote children’s learning and engagement.

Leaders are committed to engaging with parents and whānau Effective, culturally responsive practices foster success for Māori children as culturally confident and competent learners. Pacific children, those from other diverse backgrounds and children with additional learning needs benefit from the inclusive and responsive approaches that support them to succeed. Teachers’ strengths and interests support the school’s commitment to bicultural practices and partnerships with Māori. Te reo and tikanga Māori are an ongoing focus for teachers.. Good information is shared with Māori and Pacific whānau at hui and fono.

Sound, strategic governance supports the school’s effectiveness in promoting children’s wellbeing and learning. Trustees understand the aspirations of their community and make appropriate resourcing decisions. Internal evaluation is used well to support ongoing improvement.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

High quality governance and leadership, a collaborative professional environment and effective teaching contribute to high levels of student achievement and successfully promote equity and excellence.

Further strengthening evaluative inquiry and the capacity of all staff to use the school’s evaluation model will help to embed and build on current very good practices. , including those related to modern learning environments.Leaders could also strengthen the school’s partnership with families by increasing shared understandings about the school’s teaching and learning approaches

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Education (Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016 (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

At the time of this review there were no international students attending the school.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Children are achieving excellent educational outcomes. School performance has been sustained over time through well-focused, embedded processes and practices. This school has successfully addressed in-school disparity in educational outcomes.

Agreed next steps are to continue to:

  • strengthen the school’s collective capacity to use evaluation and inquiry to sustain successful initiatives, and for improvement and innovation
  • build educationally powerful connections and relationships with parents and whānau.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Violet Tu’uga Stevenson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)Te Tai Raki - Northern Region

2 October 2017

About the school

Location

Herne Bay, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1220

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

401

Gender composition

Boys 53% Girls 47%

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Pacific
Indian
other

4%
85%
4%
2%
4%

August 2017

Date of this report

2 October 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Education Review
Education Review

April 2013
November 2009
December 2006

Bayfield School - 17/04/2013

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Bayfield School is an inner city Auckland school with a long history of providing education in the Herne Bay community. The school enjoys high levels of parent support and involvement. Staffing is stable and some staff have a long association with the school.

Classrooms are sited in a variety of different ways on the terraced site. Teachers and children work cooperatively alongside each other in classrooms where spaces are shared. The school makes use of the local environment and city facilities such as swimming pools.

The school board is currently at the planning stage of a significant project to rebuild the hall, the administration area and a classroom block.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Teachers and school leaders use achievement information very well to inform the school’s charter goals and targets, classroom planning, and resourcing decisions. Achievement information is also used to identify students who will benefit from targeted learning support and extension. Students’ progress is monitored regularly over the year and throughout their time at Bayfield School. This process helps to maintain a continual focus on lifting student’s engagement in learning and to raise their achievement levels. School leaders and teachers demonstrate high levels of collective, school-wide responsibility for each student’s engagement, progress and achievement.

Teachers and parents have high expectations for students’ learning. Achievement information reported to the board and parents indicates that the majority of students achieve at or above National Standards.

The school implements many strategies to increase students’ engagement with learning and in school activities. Expectations are clearly articulated. Students have good levels of awareness about their learning and achievement. They set and monitor personal goals and can talk about their progress. Parents are involved in supporting their children to achieve these goals. Teachers use electronic media to complement teaching and learning practices and to communicate with parents.

Students have opportunities to take leadership roles in the school. They engage in a broad range of activities such as choir, sports, kapa haka and school productions. Māori and Pacific students take an active part in these activities. Students’ sense of belonging, commitment and pride in the school is apparent. Respectful relationships are a positive feature in the school. Students are confident, motivated and focused learners.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum promotes learning very effectively. It is clearly linked with The New Zealand Curriculum and expresses the school community’s values and vision for education. Recent initiatives have raised teachers’ awareness and increased provision for students to learn te reo Māori and about the bicultural heritage of Aotearoa New Zealand.

The school implements a wide variety of effective strategies to include all learners in a broad-based curriculum. The ‘Bayfield Powerful Learning Model’ promotes students’ thinking abilities and research skills in an array of meaningful and topical contexts. It provides opportunity for students to follow and extend their own interests.

Teachers participate in individual and school-wide professional development that is linked to school strategic goals. They regularly reflect on their teaching practice. Professional discussions amongst staff, about students’ progress, demonstrate their commitment to ongoing improvement in teaching and learning.

School leaders recognise that their next steps include more in-depth evaluation of the impact and effectiveness of teacher professional development on strategies to accelerate student learning. They could also consider ways to increase the visibility of Pacific and other cultures in the curriculum and school environment.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

A strategic, school-wide approach has resulted in positive developments in the school. There is increased teacher awareness of promoting success for Māori students as Māori. The school values the expertise and contributions of Māori staff, the school kaumatua and the kapa haka tutor. Whānau have opportunities for informal conversations with teachers and are invited to annual consultation hui. Recognition of students’ Māori heritage is contributing to an increasingly positive learning environment and very good levels of achievement for Māori students.

The school has separate targets for increasing Māori students’ achievement. School leaders recognise that more specific targets would help them to further support each student to reach their learning potential.

The school is exploring further ways to increase recognition of Māori students’ cultural heritage and to enhance provision for them to enjoy success as Māori. It could be useful for the board and staff to use resources associated with the Ministry of Education’s Māori education strategy, Ka Hikitia-Managing for Success, to build shared understanding and support self review.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

School governance, management and leadership practices position the school very well to sustain and continue to improve current good practices. Staff and trustees have high levels of commitment both to the school and to the provision of high quality educational opportunities and outcomes for students. They are focused on promoting success for all students and equipping them well for their future.

The board work together well as a team and know their community well. They communicate effectively with parents, and are visible and available in the school. Trustees are well informed about their responsibilities as a board and are committed to implementing successful governance practices.

The board has good understanding of its role as an employer. Personnel practices, including recruitment and appraisal, are appropriate and well managed. A high quality external appraisal for senior leaders could help to support their development as educational leaders and to affirm their professional expertise.

Regular self review is an established aspect of school operations. The board monitors progress towards regularly reviewed strategic goals. Trustees and senior leaders consult with parents and students as part of their information gathering. Teachers are highly involved in school-wide self review. The school continues to embed and deepen its self-review practices.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services

Northern Region

17 April 2013

About the School

Location

Herne Bay, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1220

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

353

Gender composition

Boys 53%

Girls 47%

Ethnic composition

New Zealand European/Pākehā

Māori

Australian

Indian

Samoan

Tongan

other ethnicities

91%

1%

2%

1%

1%

1%

3%

Review team on site

February 2013

Date of this report

17 April 2013

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

November 2009

December 2006

April 2003