Tangiteroria School

We maintain a regular review programme to evaluate and report on the education and care of young people in schools.

We are in the process of shifting from event-based external reviews to supporting each school in a process of continuous improvement.

There may be delays between reviews for some schools and kura due to Covid-19 and while we transition to our new way of reviewing.

Read more about our new processes and why we changed the way we review schools and kura.

Find out which schools have upcoming reviews.

Summary

Tangiteroria School is a small rural school between Dargaville and Whangarei. Nearly 20 percent of of children enrolled are Māori.

The school is well resourced and continues to make very good use of its unique local environment to enhance the curriculum and children’s learning. The principal, trustees, staff and whānau continue to contribute to an increasingly learner-focused school culture.

Since the 2014 ERO evaluation the staff and trustees have strengthened their bicultural practices and developed meaningful partnerships with the local marae. These have been well considered strategies to further support Māori student success. Importantly, the school’s increasing recognition of te reo Māori me ōna tikanga creates an environment that supports Māori children to succeed as Māori.

The school is part of Ngā Kura te ako o Whangarei (Group 4) Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako (CoL) with local schools to improve education opportunities for students in the area.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

Tangiteroria School responds well to Māori and other children whose learning needs acceleration. The school has consulted with its community to review the school’s future planning and refresh the school’s vision and values.

Children’s learning and wellbeing are supported through the meaningful involvement of families and whānau. Although the falling roll is a challenge for the school, the board makes resourcing decisions to ensure that no child misses out.

School achievement information over the past three years shows that overall children achieve well. Improvement plans have been developed to support the small number of children who are not achieving equitable outcomes.

Agreed next steps are to develop a more connected curriculum and establish expectations of teachers, to build greater coherence for the Tangiteroria student’s learning pathway.

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and other children remains.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

Tangiteroria School is becoming more effective in responding to children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

The school’s achievement information shows that over the last three years, the majority of children achieved the National Standards. It also shows that in 2016 close to 80 percent of all children were at or above the standard in reading and over 70 percent in writing and mathematics.

Teachers use achievement data to identify children who are at risk of not achieving. The school charter includes an annual target aimed appropriately at accelerating progress for children who are not achieving the National Standards in writing. It would be beneficial to extend targets to include children who need to make accelerated progress in mathematics and reading.

The data shows some disparity for Māori children in achievement across the standards. There is also some disparity for boys in reading and writing. In response to these differences, the school has developed an improvement plan to accelerate progress and reduce disparities. This plan is implemented in the teacher aide’s learning support programme.

It could be useful to strengthen this improvement plan by clearly emphasising:

  • the specific learning needs and strengths of children who need to make accelerated progress
  • the instructional strategies that teachers will use to meet the achievement challenges
  • the measurable indicators to be used to monitor progress towards meeting targets.

Internal moderation processes have improved. Teachers have moderated children’s writing scripts with other local schools. They are engaging in opportunities to build their professional capability and collective capacity to increase the dependability of overall judgements.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school’s processes are increasingly effective in helping it to achieve equity and excellence for all learners. The principal’s and board’s commitment to, and promotion of, educationally powerful relationships with families and whānau contribute to this effectiveness.

The principal provides very good professional leadership and is strategic in ensuring all children have equitable opportunities to learn. She has a strong focus on developing confident, professional teachers as learners, within a collaborative learning community.

The principal keeps trustees well informed about curriculum activities and student progress and achievement. Trustees use this information to make appropriate resourcing decisions. For example, the board has provided additional teaching hours to support new entrant learners. Trustees are systematically reviewing a set of board policies that cover all aspects of board operations to align them with the school's context. It could be useful for trustees to access external expertise to support them in this work.

A notable development since ERO’s 2014 evaluation is the school’s increased emphasis on promoting bicultural practices and valuing tikanga Māori. Children actively participate in welcoming visitors and confidently lead karakia and waiata each morning. Increasingly, teachers are using te reo Māori and sharing their pepeha with children. Trustees have introduced bicultural protocols at board meetings.

The school and community partners work collaboratively to support authentic learning experiences for children within the school and in the wider community. Parents who spoke with ERO appreciate the proactive communication that they have with their children’s teachers and with the school generally. They value the extended meeting times with teachers to discuss how they can better support their children’s learning at home.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

The principal recognises that it is now timely to develop a curriculum that is better aligned with the school’s new vision and values. She has an appropriate focus on increasing connections across the curriculum to create a coherent pathway for the Tangiteroria learner. It could be helpful to use the principles of The New Zealand Curriculum and access external expertise to support this development.

The board and principal have identified the need to further develop their collective capacity to use evaluation, inquiry and knowledge building to sustain improvement and innovation. Useful next steps for school development include:

  • developing more consistency in programme planning that is responsive to the learning needs, interests and aspirations of children

  • supporting teachers to inquire into their practice and evaluate its impact on outcomes for children

  • increasing children’s ability to reflect on their own thinking and learning processes.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and/or other children remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated
  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each child
  • need to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of children’s learning and achievement.
  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate children’s learning and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children
  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress
  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO will provide an internal evaluation workshop in response to a request by the school.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Steffan Brough

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

2 June 2017

About the school 

Location

Tangiteroria, Northland

Ministry of Education profile number

1104

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

39

Gender composition

Boys 22 Girls 17

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Australian

Samoan

Filipino

7

24

4

2

2

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

April 2017

Date of this report

2 June 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

May 2014

April 2011

February 2008

 

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Tangiteroria School, midway between Dargaville and Whangarei, has served its rural community for 128 years. A strong sense of history is apparent in photographic displays and historic buildings on site. The school’s logo and curriculum topics recognise and value the Māori history of the surrounding area, the Northern Wairoa. The community is settled, and there is little population turnover. The school currently caters for 56 students in Years 1 to 8. Eighteen percent of students are of Māori descent. Some families’ connections with the school span several generations and most are involved in the farming industry.

The school benefits from high levels of commitment and support from the board of trustees and its Home and School Association. Long-standing teaching and support staff know children and their families very well and contribute to the sense of family, stability and belonging that students experience. The Tangiteroria SPiRIT values underpin interactions, relationships and the curriculum. Students understand and reflect these values, which include self control, perseverance, independence, respect and tolerance.

The school’s three classrooms are well resourced and well presented. The extensive grounds, including orchard, bush area, large field and swimming pool, are well used to support students’ learning. School beehives offer further authentic learning opportunities and bring in funding for the school. The annual agricultural day is a feature of the school’s calendar. The board and staff continue to explore ways of maximising the potential of these resources.

The school is currently in a period of transition after the appointment of a new principal in December 2013. The new principal's clear vision for developments in the school align with board strategic goals for sustaining current values and good practices and with goals for further strengthening school performance.

ERO’s 2011 report recommended a review of the school’s te reo Māori programme, increasing student ownership of their learning processes, improved use and reporting of achievement data, and strengthening self review. The principal and staff have begun to address these areas.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The principal and other teachers are refining and developing school assessment practices so achievement information can be better analysed and used more effectively to inform teaching programmes and board decisions. Increasing students’ understanding about their own assessment data and learning goals is part of this development.

Publicly available achievement information for 2012 and the school’s 2013 data show that most students achieve well in relation to the National Standards. Māori students are included in these positive results. The board and principal have used 2013 achievement data to set targets and to identify strategies for accelerating the progress of the few students who are not yet achieving at National Standard levels. The school plans to achieve these targets through personalising learning programmes and carefully monitoring students’ progress.

The principal is leading teacher professional development to help staff make more reliable overall judgements about students’ achievement. This should result in better use of data by teachers and students to enhance learning. It should also help the board better assess the impact of initiatives in the school.

The school reports to parents about students’ achievement in relation to the learning areas of The New Zealand Curriculum (NZC). These reports now need to be revised so they are more explicit about student progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum promotes and support students’ learning well. There is a focus on providing extensive learning opportunities and success for all students. Programmes are well planned and implemented. They cover all learning areas of the NZC and promote thinking and problem solving, particularly in the senior room. The curriculum takes advantage of the opportunities for learning within the school grounds and in local rural activities and community events.

Students have made meaningful contributions to school decisions in areas such as developing the school values, managing the bush learning environment, and identifying the attributes required in a new principal. Senior students have a sense of responsibility for others in the school and value leadership opportunities. The principal continues to consider ways of extending student leadership and self-management across the school.

The school’s curriculum is underpinned by the board’s vision of fostering responsible, life-long learners, and by the school’s SPiRIT values. Teaching and learning is supported by a strong foundation of school systems and high levels of community commitment. The board and teachers are concerned for student wellbeing and aspire to high levels of success and achievement for students.

School operations and decisions are becoming more transparent and the teaching team is increasingly collaborative and cohesive. The principal has identified staff strengths, is fostering shared understandings about best practice, and is promoting shared leadership.

The principal and teachers are thinking strategically about curriculum review and development. It would now be timely to document the Tangiteroria School curriculum to ensure that it reflects the NZC, the school’s vision and values, and the current features and good practices in the school. The board and principal agree that it is also an appropriate time to consider a more strategic and coordinated approach to wellbeing in the school. A meaningful community consultation process will be an important aspect of these developments.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Māori students achieve well and make a positive contribution in the school. They take on leadership roles, demonstrate initiative and have skills to share. They benefit from the sense of whānau and strong tuakana/teina relationships in the school.

The school’s curriculum has strong connections with Papatūānuku through the bush, orchard and involvement with a local nursery. The Wairoa river, the maunga Tangihua, and Māori history are represented in the school’s recently developed logo. Te reo and aspects of tikanga Māori are threaded through the curriculum and are visible in classroom environments.

A whakawhanaungatanga curriculum focus supported the wellbeing of students and has been appreciated by whānau. A pōwhiri for the principal and new students at the beginning of 2014 has re-established connections with kaumātua and was also appreciated by whānau.

The board and principal are committed to supporting and building on current good practices that promote the wellbeing and identity of Māori students. They plan to continue rebuilding historical connections with the Tangiteroria Māori community and strengthening partnerships with whānau to support students’ learning. The school should use the Ministry of Education’s document, Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success, and consult with the Māori community to establish a shared understanding about the concept of success as Māori.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain its special features and effective practices, and to continue improving. It has a sound foundation of well established culture and values, high levels of community commitment, and efficient operational and governance systems.

The board has both new and experienced trustees and is thinking strategically about continuity, sustainability and the school’s future direction. Regular policy review, community surveys and consultation, and an annual strategic plan review are established aspects of school self review. Teaching staff are positive about the direction the school is taking. Students also comment positively on recent changes that are recognising their achievements and giving them better information about their learning progress.

Trustees and the principal recognise the need to continue refining school policies and procedures and to deepen self review across the school. They plan to make better use of data to monitor progress towards strategic goals. The board could access further support to refresh trustees’ understanding of their governance role and to enable them to ensure that their new principal is well supported in her role.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

To improve current practice:

  • the principal and teachers should review the format of twice-yearly reports to parents about students’ progress towards and achievement in relation to the National Standards
  • every two years, in consultation with the community, the board must adopt a statement on the delivery of the school’s health curriculum.
When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

23 May 2014

About the School

Location

Tangiteroria, Northland

Ministry of Education profile number

1104

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

56

Gender composition

Girls 29

Boys 27

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

other

39

10

7

Review team on site

March 2014

Date of this report

23 May 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

April 2011

February 2008

June 2005